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Subject: Baked Potatoes:  Microwave or regular oven?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Raymond J Maisano 
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 17:50:42 -0500
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I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they
come out in a regular oven.  The skin seems crisper and less prone to slide
off of the potato when done in the regular oven.

I know the obvious response is, "Then make them in your regular oven." but I
was curious about how the rest of you feel on this question.

Ray

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From: klsnow2[at]aol.com (KLSNOW2)
Date: 04 Nov 2001 23:22:00 GMT
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Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

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From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sun, 4 Nov 2001 18:30:19 -0500
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KLSNOW2 wrote:
> Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
> skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

Nope!!!  Wrong answer!!!   No salt, no oil, no foil...  If you wanna good
baked 'tater then just bake the 'ol plain-jane at 375-400 for 'bout an hour.
If your looking for a soft-skin, place it in foil for a few minutes
AFTER it comes out of the oven (not while it's baking -- you don't
want a ~steamed~ potato, do 'ya?).

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From: Leon Manfredi 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 05:49:57 -0500
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K3 wrote:
>baked 'tater then just bake the 'ol plain-jane at 375-400 for 'bout an hour.

Too much wasted time.....Poke with fork fairly well all around to puncture skin,
zap in microwave 2 minutes, flip over another two minutes. Repeat this process.
When they feel soft to a squeeze, you may elect to  finish them off to you likings,
either in an oven or toaster oven at 400. I hate working in a sweat shop!

By the way.....you don't have to be always on hand, just to flip the spuds,
they'll still be there when you get back from another preparation.....

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From: Miche 
Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 18:45:29 +1300
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Leon Manfredi wrote:
> Too much wasted time.....Poke with fork fairly well all around to puncture skin,
> zap in microwave 2 minutes, flip over another two minutes. Repeat this process.

Ah another one who doesn't think good food is worth a little time.

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From: amoorman[at]visi.com (Alan)
Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 19:22:06 -0600
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Leon Manfredi gave this insight:
:Too much wasted time.....Poke with fork fairly well all around to puncture skin,

Make sure you poke the fork all the way to the middle of the potato so
the steam can get out.

Don't just prick a few holes on the surface, or some day one will
explode in the microwave, and you'll have to clean it all up .. . . .

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From: David Wright 
Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2001 23:35:49 GMT
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KLSNOW2 wrote:
> Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
> skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

I can't imagine that a wrapped potato in the oven would be much different
from a nuked one. Aren't they both steamed? I like to grease/butter the
skins and bake 'em without a wrap.

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From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 00:22:18 GMT
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KLSNOW2 wrote:
> Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
> skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

If you wrap the thing in foil, you might as well nuke it....the skin 
will come out the same way, soft and "steamed".

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From: Michael Edelman 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 08:28:52 -0500
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KLSNOW2 wrote:
> Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
> skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

If you're going to wrap it in foil you may as well microwave it, as it'll steam
in the foil.

I prefer to oil the potatoes before oven roasting. If I'm cooking them for use in
a recipe I'll boil or microwave them.

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From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 5 Nov 2001 14:26:56 GMT
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KLSNOW2 wrote:
> Conventional oven is the only way to go.  Scrub the tater, apply salt to the
> skin and wrap in foil, back at around 375-400 for hour and half.  Can't lose.

What you describedd is not a baked potato, its a steamed potato. Wrapping
a potato in foil traps the steam and prevents the dry heating that's
essential to getting a good dry crispy skin on a potato. Omit the foil
if you want a real baked potato.

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From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 00:21:36 GMT
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Raymond J Maisano wrote:
> I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
> user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they
> come out in a regular oven.  The skin seems crisper and less prone to slide
> off of the potato when done in the regular oven.

Nuke em for 4 minutes, then crisp up the skins in the toaster oven, if 
you have one.

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From: Ruth 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 11:36:44 +1100
--------
Raymond J Maisano wrote:
>I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
>user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they
>come out in a regular oven.  The skin seems crisper and less prone to slide
>off of the potato when done in the regular oven.

Not sure where you are from, however, in Australia we can buy Desiree
potatoes (reddish/brown) and these are ideal baked in a circular
microwave dish.

No need to prick them first - my microwave is an old one now, a
Pansonic 500/600 so I find if I put in two of much the same size 6
minutes is about right.  Obviously you will need less time if yours is
a current model!  Pop a bamboo skewer through the middle to make sure
it's done!

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From: Jim K 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 00:55:13 GMT
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I prefer regular oven baked, but considering the time, usually nuke
them.

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From: Mikkel de Winther 
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2001 04:08:55 +0100
--------
I like to halve the potatoes, sprinkle with salt, pepper and a little olive
oil and bake 'em in the oven.

Actually, come to think about it, I think I've never tried nuking potatoes.
Maybe I should give it a shot just to try it.

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From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 03:21:28 GMT
--------
Raymond J Maisano wrote:
> I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
> user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they
> come out in a regular oven.  The skin seems crisper and less prone to slide
> off of the potato when done in the regular oven.

Picker of nits that I am, you can't "bake" anything in a microwave.  Cook,
yes, but baking requires dry heat.

We prefer a real baked potato.  Nothing in a microwave can come close.
OTOH, I often cook a potato for lunch at work since I don't have any
alternatives.  Speed is the only advantage of a MW.

While on the subject, you will get better results from anything you cook in
it if you allow waiting time.  It allows the food to warm evenly.  Allow 25
to 50% of the cooking time for the "wait" before serving.

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 21:54:42 +1300
--------
Raymond J Maisano wrote:
> I know the obvious response is, "Then make them in your regular oven." but I
> was curious about how the rest of you feel on this question.

If I want baked potatoes I do them in the oven.  If I want potatoes 
steamed in their skin I do them in the microwave.  

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From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 5 Nov 2001 12:12:26 GMT
--------
Raymond J Maisano wrote:
> I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
> user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they
> come out in a regular oven.  The skin seems crisper and less prone to slide
> off of the potato when done in the regular oven.

I agree with you. Baked potatoes taste much better to me when they're
slowly baked in an oven. As you'll see, some people prefer a hybrid
method where they nuke a potato for a brief period, then finish it off
in their microwave. For me, a baked potato is either baked the entire
way or its not a baked potato.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Nov 2001 16:12:16 GMT
--------
stan@temple writes:
>Baked potatoes taste much better to me when they're
>slowly baked in an oven.

Define "slowly baked".  To me that means bake in a *slow oven* which translates
to an oven set to bake at a comparatively low temperature, as in, culinarilly
speaking of course, about 300 F.  In other words, Stan, you like your baked
spuds like sorta dehydrated... perhaps you should munch on slightly humidified
Potato Buds. 

http://www.wgts.org/cookbook/oventemp.html

                    Oven Temperatures

ELECTRIC	         CELSIUS	     FAHRENHEIT
TEMPERATURES		

Very slow	         120	     		250
Slow		         150	     		300
Moderately slow	         160-180	     325-350
Moderate		 180-200	     375-400
Moderately hot	         210-230	     425-450
Hot		         240-250	     475-500
Very hot		 260	     	     525-550

GAS		         CELSIUS	     FAHRENHEIT	 GAS
TEMPERATURES						 MARK

Very slow	         120	  	   	250	   1
Slow	                 150	     		300	   2
Moderately slow	         160	     		325	   3
Moderate		 180	     		350	   4
Moderately hot	         190	     		375	   5
Hot		         200	     		400	   6
Very hot		 230	     		450	   7

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From: forcooksonly[at]aol.com (ForCooksOnly)
Date: 05 Nov 2001 13:20:32 GMT
--------
>potato when done in the regular oven.

Thre ONLY way to make a baked potato 
is in a stove-top potao baker! They are IMPOSSIBLE to find but I did find in in
the Walter Drake catalog.

Microwave "baked" potatoes--YUCK!!!

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From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 5 Nov 2001 14:38:53 GMT
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ForCooksOnly wrote:
> Thre ONLY way to make a baked potato is in a stove-top potao baker!
> They are IMPOSSIBLE to find but I did find in in the Walter Drake catalog. 

What's a stove-top potato baker? How does it improve upon a baked potato
that's baked in an oven?

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Nov 2001 19:57:25 GMT
--------
stan@temple writes:
>What's a stove-top potato baker? 

It's a thingie made from a coffee can and a pie tin, 
poked fulla holes and used to bake spuds onna stove 
top boiner, preferably a gas stove.  Of course rich folks
had ones made inna factory, with a genuwine bakelite 
knob on top... there were all sorts of stovetop bread 
toasters too.

>How does it improve upon a baked potato
>that's baked in an oven?

It doesn't.  The best potatoes are those that are swiped from Rocco's push cart
on 13th Ave. & 43rd St., each one wrapped in six layers of Grandpa's Jewish
newspaper (after he read it, or else) and buried under hot embers from a died
down big old fire in a hand dug hole in a vacant lot somewhere in Brooklyn...
aintcha ever ate mickies?  Natcherly no goil ever seen mickies being prepared
and no goil ever even ate a mickie, not until he was at least 12 years old. 

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 18:43:53 +1300
--------
ForCooksOnly wrote:
> Thre ONLY way to make a baked potato 
> is in a stove-top potao baker! They are IMPOSSIBLE to find but I did find in in
> the Walter Drake catalog.

I disagree.  The "only" way to bake a potato is in the oven.

============================

From: Richard Caley 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 16:22:56 GMT
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Raymond J Maisano writes:
> I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time
> microwave user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I

If you do them in the microwave they don't bake they
boil/steam. Nothing wrong with that but it is a different product. 

If you microwave a few smallish potatoes, then mash them down just a
bit and put something which wil melt a bit on top (butter, cheese,
pate all work), grind on some pepper and you gets a good quick snack. 

Not a replacement for baked spud though.

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From: Michelle 
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 22:57:11 GMT
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I'm a Cook-The-Spud-In-The-Oven kinda person.

Just wash, fork it once, bake for about an hour at 400 and they will be
delish.  Sometimes I oil, kosher salt and wrap in foil because that is how
my DH likes them, but usually not.

HOWEVER,
I sometimes, when I want a potato for lunch, put in in the microwave for a
few minutes to cook it 3/4 of the way, then I stick it in the oven to
"crisp" up.  It doesn't get as fluffy, but it does work in a pinch.

============================

From: Brian Rodenborn 
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2001 23:49:00 GMT
--------
Michelle wrote:
> Just wash, fork it once, bake for about an hour at 400 and they will be
> delish.  Sometimes I oil, kosher salt and wrap in foil because that is how
> my DH likes them, but usually not.

Definitely don't forget the part about sticking a fork in it. When I had
first gotten my own apartment, I decided to bake some taters. Whilst
watching TV, I hear the dull *boom* from the kitchen. Investigate,
nothing, shrug. Then I go to check the potatoes since I'm there, and I
find that one of those babies had exploded all over the inside of the
oven. 

The funny thing was, what was left of the exploded one was a most
amazingly fluffy potato. Very good, but the methodology leaves something
to be desired. 

============================

From: Wyatt Taylor 
Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 01:44:33 GMT
--------
You can make great baked potatoes in a pressure cooker. Toss 'em in and cook
for 15 minutes. I wrap them in foil after I take them out, with a little
salt and butter in the foil as I wrap them up... and toss them on the grill
or put them in the oven. Everyone loves them.

============================

From: amoorman[at]visi.com (Alan)
Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 19:20:55 -0600
--------
Raymond J Maisano gave this insight:
:I know the obvious response is, "Then make them in your regular oven." but I
:was curious about how the rest of you feel on this question.

Conventional oven is better, but I haven't done that for about 10
years!   I use the microwave ALL the time for potatoes.

Actually, I nuke them, and then usually mash them -- they're better
than boiled potatoes for mashed.

Also -- quick, good potato soup:  I will "sorta" mash them and then,
in a sauce pan,  mix them with milk and a little butter, some black
pepper (sometimes a bit of garlic).  Heat almost to boiling, but don't
boil.  Add enough milk to make thick soup (or thin, if you prefer) and
the result is wonderful. 
(heating the mixture close to boiling will make it thicken, you may
want to add more milk.

============================

From: see post sig for address! 
Date: Wed, 07 Nov 2001 20:10:56 GMT
--------
Raymond J Maisano wrote:
>I recently got a microwave (yes, at age 34 I'm a first time microwave
>user!).  After making a few baked potatoes in it, I think I prefer how they

I am a microwave-aholic on some things, potatoes is NOT one of them.

I did baked potatoes in the microwave for awhile, and just don't care for them.
In a pinch if I take the potatoes out early by accident, I will finish them up
in micro. This happens sometimes on those really big bakers I can sometimes get
in the store.

I switched back to in the oven mode and refuse to make them any other way now.

I take them rub with a little butter and then cover with coarse salt, wrap in
aluminum foil and into a 400 DEG F oven. Its even better if you have a
convection oven to do them.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 07 Nov 2001 20:43:08 GMT
--------
KXDPHYAXUJTB writes:
>I take them, rub with a little butter and then cover with coarse salt, wrap in
>aluminum foil and into a 400 DEG F oven.

Why do you "take" them... taters are inexpensive, next time instead of
shoplifting pay for them.

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From: Brian Rodenborn 
Date: Wed, 7 Nov 2001 21:03:07 GMT
--------
wpascanner wrote:
> I take them rub with a little butter and then cover with coarse salt, wrap in
> aluminum foil and into a 400 DEG F oven. Its even better if you have a
> convection oven to do them.

Good grief! What is this fascination for wrapping up the poor taters in
foil? So they steam rather than bake?

Let them roast in their own jackets.

============================

From: Steve YATES 
Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2001 21:34:18 +0100
--------
Mircowaves don't cook, they heat !

My preferred method is to rub them with salt and olive oil and then put them on a
skewer. This avoids the bursting problem and also conducts heat to centre.

Steve

(I also love to wrap in tinfoil and put inside the real fire we have in kitchen,
but you have to be careful they don't overbake. The skins done this way are superb
and remind me of when we used to bake them at home in the cinder tray of the fire,
without the foil !)

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 08 Nov 2001 21:10:03 GMT
--------
Steve YATES writes:
>Mircowaves don't cook, they heat 

Well, duh.

"Merriam Webster"

[2]cook

intransitive 

1 : to prepare food for eating by means of heat

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Subject: Re: Baked Potatoes: Microwave or regular oven?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: rsand[at]dwave.net (Karen Sandquist)
Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2001 02:30:11 GMT
--------
I usually bake them in my microwave for a couple of minutes for about
4 potatoes, then I bake them either in the oven or on  the grill.  It
takes less time in the oven.


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