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Subject: Are De-Greened Potatoes Safe To Eat ???
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Mark Thorson 
Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2007 17:33:30 -0700
--------
On the America's Test Kitchen show, they gave a tip
about how to de-green potatoes that have turned green.
They said to put them in a cool, dark place, and the
green color will go away.

I'd never heard that before.  The reason not to eat
potatoes that have turned green is that they may
contain solanine, a toxic compound found at low levels
in all potatoes but at much higher levels in potatoes
that have turned green or sprouted.

If this de-greening procedure works, I wonder if the
potatoes would be safe to eat?  The green is chlorophyll,
not solanine (which is colorless).  I'd be skeptical
that the solanine has disappered, even if the green color
is gone.

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From: Julie Bove 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 03:32:56 GMT
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I've never heard of making it disappear.  I try not to buy green potatoes, 
but if I get some with green on them, I just cut off the green part and eat 
them.  I'm not dead yet. 

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From: raymond 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 09:21:19 -0400
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Julie Bove wrote:
>I've never heard of making it disappear.  I try not to buy green potatoes, 
>but if I get some with green on them, I just cut off the green part and eat 
>them.  I'm not dead yet. 

Me too. If that didn't work, there would be no Irish or sailors left
alive. 

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 14:31:50 -0700
--------
raymond wrote:
> Me too. If that didn't work, there would be no Irish or sailors left
> alive.

The sailor thing also attests to the healthfulness of buggery.

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From: raymond 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 18:25:38 -0400
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Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
>The sailor thing also attests to the healthfulness of buggery.

I had to look that word up on Wikipedia. You are referring, of course,
to the British Navy, and I wholeheartedly concur.

============================

From: David Hare-Scott 
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 17:48:37 +1000
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
> The sailor thing also attests to the healthfulness of buggery.

And rum and the lash

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From: blake murphy 
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 17:05:45 GMT
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
>The sailor thing also attests to the healthfulness of buggery.

but apparently you have to eat a lime afterwards.

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From: Dee Dee 
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 13:27:24 -0400
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blake murphy wrote:
> but apparently you have to eat a lime afterwards.

Wrong orifice.

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From: Nancy2 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 08:43:15 -0700
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Julie Bove wrote:
> I've never heard of making it disappear.  I try not to buy green potatoes,
> but if I get some with green on them, I just cut off the green part and eat
> them.  I'm not dead yet.- Hide quoted text -

Me, too.  I think it's exposure to light that makes them green - mine
are stored inside a cupboard until I use them, and I usually bag them
in dark plastic (ventilated) bags, with a square of paper towel thrown
in in case there's any moisture.

============================

From: Dee Dee 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 15:29:56 -0400
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> Me, too.  I think it's exposure to light that makes them green - mine
> are stored inside a cupboard until I use them, and I usually bag them
> in dark plastic (ventilated) bags, with a square of paper towel thrown
> in in case there's any moisture.

I don't buy them if there is a hint of green, but when I bring them home, I 
put them on a large baking pan (didn't someone a while back ask me why I 
needed all those baking pans?) and place it on the bottom rack of a table 
and cover it completely with dish cloths to keep the light away from them. 
They usually get wrinkled before they get green.

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From: Karen AKA Kajikit 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 00:25:53 -0400
--------
Mark Thorson wrote:
>On the America's Test Kitchen show, they gave a tip
>about how to de-green potatoes that have turned green.
>They said to put them in a cool, dark place, and the
>green color will go away.

If you put a green potato in a cool dark place, it will still be green
- but if it was only partly green, it shouldn't get any MORE green
than it was when you put it away. The cool dark place is meant to keep
them from turning green in the first place. 
When I get a potato that's more than a little green I turf it out. If
it's only green on one end or in a small spot, I cut off a generous
margin around the greenness and use the rest of the potato as normal.

============================

From: Buddy 
Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 15:32:24 -0400
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here's Karen AKA Kajikit's last post ->:
> If you put a green potato in a cool dark place, it will still be green
> - but if it was only partly green, it shouldn't get any MORE green
> than it was when you put it away. The cool dark place is meant to keep
> them from turning green in the first place. 
> When I get a potato that's more than a little green I turf it out. If
> it's only green on one end or in a small spot, I cut off a generous
> margin around the greenness and use the rest of the potato as normal.

The green is from sunburn while growing (sticking out of the 
ground.) Pretty sure all you have to do is cook them as usual 
after recommended peeling.

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From: Kate Connally 
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 11:05:55 -0400
--------
Mark Thorson wrote:
> On the America's Test Kitchen show, they gave a tip
> about how to de-green potatoes that have turned green.
> They said to put them in a cool, dark place, and the
> green color will go away.

Well, I don't even worry about it.  If I'm peeling them
I just remove the green layer with the peel.  If I'm baking
or boiling them then I just do so and the green goes away.
I have not died yet.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 16:27:02 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
>Well, I don't even worry about it.  If I'm peeling them
>I just remove the green layer with the peel.  If I'm baking
>or boiling them then I just do so and the green goes away.
>I have not died yet.

are you sure?  maybe it's someone who just looks like you posting
here.

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From: Kate Connally 
Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2007 11:17:07 -0400
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blake murphy wrote:
> are you sure?  maybe it's someone who just looks like you posting
> here.

Believe me - I'd know if I were dead.  For one thing
I wouldn't have all these aches and pains all the time.
Except for the fact that I would cease to exist, death
might be a good thing.  Well, I'm sure there are plenty
of people out there who might disagree with that.

============================

From: ppnerkDELETETHIS[at]yahoo.com (Phred)
Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2007 11:13:54 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
>Believe me - I'd know if I were dead.  For one thing
>I wouldn't have all these aches and pains all the time.

Probably comes from eating green spuds. :-)

Symptoms
[Stolen from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002875.htm ]
Hypothermia
Paralysis 
Shock 
Fever 
Slowed breathing 
Dilated pupils 
Vision changes 
Stomach or abdominal pain 
Vomiting 
Diarrhea 
Slow pulse 
Headache 
Delirium 
Loss of sensation 
Hallucinations 

Actually, if you don't trust the government you can find advice on 
Snopes http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/potato.asp

.. unless you are deliberately seeking out green potatoes to eat, you are 
unlikely to ingest enough of the toxin to do harm. The potatoes we buy contain 
such a minute amount of the chemical that a healthy adult would have to eat 
about 4-1/2 pounds at one sitting to experience any neurological symptoms. Ergo, 
don't worry about having the occasional green potato chip, but do discard any 
potatoes that have green eyes, sprouts, or greenish skins, rather than prepare 
and serve them, especially to children. (Children's smaller body size makes them 
more susceptible to ill effects.) 


>Except for the fact that I would cease to exist, death
>might be a good thing.  Well, I'm sure there are plenty
>of people out there who might disagree with that.

If you ceased to exist you wouldn't know you are dead. ;-)

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From: Mark Thorson 
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 12:02:26 -0700
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> Well, I don't even worry about it.  If I'm peeling them
> I just remove the green layer with the peel.  If I'm baking
> or boiling them then I just do so and the green goes away.
> I have not died yet.

But if you had died, you wouldn't be able
to be here and say "Mark was right!", so
your testimony cannot be interpreted as
evidence.  For all we know, there might
be dozens of people who aren't around
anymore to give their contradictory
experience.


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