[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]

Subject: soggy french fries
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: sk[at]syrano.acb.uc.edu (Steve Kleene)
Date: 13 Jul 2003 10:17:43 -0400
--------
I could use some advice on making french fries in a deep-fat fryer.  The
fries I've been making have a good flavor but are more soggy than crispy.

I can think of two possible problems.  The first is that the oil might not
get (or stay) hot enough.  My fryer goes up to 375 F.  A really old one we
have goes up to 400 F, but the fries are about the same.  I could guess that
putting in too many fries, or fries that are cool to start with, cools off
the oil too much.  However, long ago my mom would make fries for four in the
same size fryer, and they were great.

The other possible problem is the oil.  I've been using canola oil, and I'd
think it would get as hot as any other oil.  Long ago, though, my mom
probably used vegetable oil or even fat like Crisco.

Can anyone tell me how to get crispier fries?  Thanks.

============================

From: Judy Bednar 
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2003 00:35:33 +1000
--------
All you need to do is to fry them until they become soft (sort of wrinkly), take
them out and wait for the oil to heat up again, then pop them back in.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 15:02:50 GMT
--------
Judy Bednar wrote:
> All you need to do is to fry them until they become soft (sort of wrinkly), take
> them out and wait for the oil to heat up again, then pop them back in. 

The 2 step stage of French Frying Fries.

First off you need a decent thermometer... (Keeping the temp close to the 
360F ish) Don't rely on a factory setting on the fryer.

You need to put only enough fries in the oil so that the temperature 
doesn't drop way too far.

Cook the fries in batches if you need to.

Do the first fry only till the fries are cooked (not crisp). Soft inside. 
Slightly yellowish in color.

Allow the previously cooked but soggy fries to accumulate and store in the 
oven on paper towels. To keep them warm and to drain a bit.

Next get the fryer good and hot 375F ish

Fry up the soggy fries to crispness not allowing the oil temperature to 
cool 

Fry them to crispness desired. Again batch cooking may be needed to reduce 
temperature loss.

Salt or season immediately after the second fry. WEll get them on a plate 
first; but soonest after cooking seasoning is important.

Another thing you may consider is soaking the french fries in water, to 
remove starches. This works well to make tasty fries. Soak them at least a 
hour preferred over night. And dry them really well to reduce boil over of 
the hot oil when placed in the fryer.

Also the thickness of cut plays importance to the fries. Again your 
preference. I like my fries kinda thin.

Also the type of potato makes a big difference...I like red or waxy spuds 
for fries. I think Russets or mealy potatoes suck for fry making. YMMV.

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 10:41:15 -0400
--------
Steve Kleene wrote:
> Can anyone tell me how to get crispier fries?  Thanks.

Fry 'em twice!!!

You're talking 'bout homemade, cut-up fresh potaotes, right?   You are using
starchy russets, right?  You are soaking the cut-up potaotes in icy cold
water, right?   You are draining them well (of water/moisture -- so that
they're almost dry before frying them), right?   You do have a sheetpan
lines with paper towels (or brown paper bags) to absorb the grease, right?

If so, deep fry 'em for a few minutes ('bout half-way) and then drain them
on paper-towels...let them cool off a bit... then turn the deep-fat fryer on
"wicked high" and fry 'em again 'til crisp.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 15:08:13 GMT
--------
Steve Kleene wrote:
> I could use some advice on making french fries in a deep-fat fryer.  The
> fries I've been making have a good flavor but are more soggy than crispy.

I find a old aluminum pot delegated to fry making works best (a thermometer 
is required).

A fry machine seems to require way too much effort to clean. 
Whereas the pot needs only be emptied and put in the dishwasher.

And a cheap aluminum pot and fry basket can be purchased fairly reasonably.
The pot usually holds more oil and the stove is better at keeping the temp 
constant.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 19:25:35 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> A fry machine seems to require way too much effort to clean. 
> Whereas the pot needs only be emptied and put in the dishwasher.

Never tried using one, but I thought the big deal about a
"fry machine" was that you DON'T clean it after every use -
you put a lid on it and use the oil again.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2003 11:11:27 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> Never tried using one, but I thought the big deal about a
> "fry machine" was that you DON'T clean it after every use -
> you put a lid on it and use the oil again.

Same goes for a pot...put on its lid.

============================

From: Frenchy 
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2003 06:06:27 +1200
--------
Steve Kleene wrote:
> Can anyone tell me how to get crispier fries?  Thanks.

Cut the fries up and then boil them in some salted water for 5 mins.  Drain well and leave
in the hot pot with lid off for water to further evaporate.  Then follow the advice of other
posters on this matter, with the choice of spud and the cook twice in batches being
critical.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 16:35:18 -0600
--------
Steve Kleene wrote:
> Can anyone tell me how to get crispier fries?  Thanks.

After you cut up the potatoes, soak them in ice water for at
least 30 minutes.
While you are heating up the oil, drain the chips and let
them dry between two towels.

For the first frying, do small batches and only fry until
the chips are barely cooked; don't try to brown them. Drain
well. For the second frying, let the oil reheat thoroughly;
often people don't wait quite long enough. Then fry the
chips in small batches until they are browned. Drain well
and eat right away.

Have never found any difference in various oils. As long as
the frying temp isn't right at the smoke point, any oil
should produce crisp chips/fries.

The potatoes you are using aren't likely to be exactly the
same as the potatoes your mother used. I don't know which US
potatoes are best for making chips.

============================

From: Vilco 
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2003 22:56:53 GMT
--------
Once, a japanese apprentice cook told me this: anything you fry, fry it at
180C, which is when a pinewood spear will start to fry. He said many
japanese cook use this method.


[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]