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Subject: Homemade Mashed Potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Ashley Williams 
Date: 13 Sep 98 22:20:58 GMT
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How do yo mash them when you don't have a food processor or anything like
that??

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From: Harriet Neal 
Date: Sun, 13 Sep 1998 18:17:04 -0400
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Don't forget to warm your milk slightly before you add it to the potatoes, or
you will have instant glue..not hot, just warm.

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From: Rick Marinelli 
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 12:47:00 GMT
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Why would cold milk result in gluey potatoes?  This results from
development of gluten, which happens when you use a food processor or
mixer to mash potatoes.  I use the old hand masher.  Sometimes the
traditional way is best... :)

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From: idlewild[at]webspan.net (June Oshiro)
Date: 23 Sep 1998 17:58:10 GMT
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rick, you're getting confused.  gluten is a protein formed by
adding water to gliadin and glutenin, two proteins found in
wheat.  this is what makes your bread dough nice and stretchy.

the reason potatoes get all nasty when they are overprocessed
is because you are breaking down the network that the starch
is encapsulated in.  releasing the starch makes the stuff
sticky.  i do mine in a food mill.

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From: Mr. Robin Cowdrey 
Date: Tue, 29 Sep 1998 19:18:49 -0600
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I don't think it's gluten that makes the taters
gluey...think you only find gluten in grains.  It may,
however have something to do with the breakdown of starch.

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From: joan3[at]ix.netcom.com (Joan Ellis)
Date: Sun, 13 Sep 1998 23:27:43 GMT
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Use an old-fashioned potato masher. Much better results than a food
processor.

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From: brawny[at]mindspring.com (Brawny)
Date: Sun, 13 Sep 1998 23:29:06 GMT
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Ashley Williams wrote:
>How do yo mash them when you don't have a food processor or anything like
>that??

DON'T EVER put your potatoes in a food processor....you will have an instant
glue pot that will not be recovered.    

You need a potato rices or a plain potato masher found at any kitchen supply
house.    Sorry to tell you this, but the best mashed potatoes are done entirely
by hand.  

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From: rdyoung[at]wcc.net (Bob Y.)
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 13:52:18 GMT
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Brawny wrote:
>DON'T EVER put your potatoes in a food processor....

Roger that! The smoothest, fluffiest mashed potatoes result from using a potato
ricer. Beats the heck out regular potato mashers. There are those who swear by
using the mixer to mash potatoes, but get a a ricer and try it first.

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From: "James Adrian van Wyk, PE, PP" 
Date: 14 Sep 1998 01:41:09 GMT
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Ashley Williams wrote:
> How do yo mash them when you don't have a food processor or anything like
> that??

A fork.

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From: Barb 
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 05:24:52 GMT
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James Adrian van Wyk wrote:
> A fork.

Reminded me of one of my most memorable Thanksgiving experiences:

I had bought my house in August and was having my first Thanksgiving meal  
there with several friends (two couples and another woman). I thought I  
had thought of everything ahead of time... but when it came time to mash  
the potatoes, I realized that I didn't have a potato masher. I enlisted  
one of the strong-armed men to attack the problem with a fork, which he  
reluctantly agreed to do... until, at the last minute, his partner asked,  
"Hey, what's that over there?" It was an antique masher, decoratively  
placed in a crockery wine cooler with some other old utensils, sitting  
placidly on the counter. "Uh, decoration?" I lamely answered... Everyone  
laughed, the guy on fork duty was relieved, and I'm teased about it to  
this day.
--
@}-->---

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From: ericp[at]mindspring.com (eric pearson)
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 01:55:58 GMT
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Boil potatoes till quite soft. I mash mine with one of two tools:
1) A tool which is sort of a handle on top of a cylinder which is
about 2 to 2.5 inches diameter. All wood.
2) A tool which has a wood handle and two metal parts shaped like
several S-curves, with a spring between the two parts.

Sorry, I do not know the names of these. I got them used at flea
markets for a dollar or two.

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From: Chef pat 
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 23:18:37 GMT
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How about a hand masher, or if you don't have that the back of a wooden spoon.

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From: danigeo[at]enter.net
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 04:29:50 GMT
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I use an electric mixer with the beaters. I add some butter and milk a
little at a time until they are fluffy.

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From: Steve Calvin 
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 08:41:19 -0400
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I warm some milk in the microwave and have the butter softened.
Put the potatoes in the strainer then add some (not all) of the 
milk and butter into the pan and back onto the heat just for a 
few seconds.

Potatoes back into the pan, turn heat off.  Add salt and pepper
to your taste and then use an electric mixer to begin mashing.
Turn it on slowly and in "spurts" at first or your kitchen may
become a disaster area.... LOL

Add milk slowly and in stages until the consistancy you desire
is reached.

As twists, some of your favorite cheeses or roasted garlic
make for an interesting twist.

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From: "James Adrian van Wyk, PE, PP" 
Date: 15 Sep 1998 23:15:35 GMT
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My wife adds butter, margrine, milk, salt, and pepper, to the 
potatoes; and she whipps them up with a hand mixer.

I add nothing, and mash the potatoes with a dinner fork.

Mine tastes more like potatoes and has less calories and fat.

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From: Marcella M. simon 
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 17:47:34 -0400
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I like a grating of fresh nutmeg in my potatoes which I mash by hand.  I
also add butter, milk, salt, and black pepper.  Sometimes if I feel like
making dinner extra special I add rosemary and roasted garlic and replace
some of the butter with olive oil (extra virgin).  Oh, I also leave the
skins on and put plenty of salt in the boiling water.

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From: dancertm[at]primenet.com (dancertm)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 15:48:23 GMT
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I've always used my food processor, works great. I also leave the
skins on, too.

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From: heatherondo[at]webtv.net (heather m)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 06:17:32 -0500 (CDT)
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you buy a $2 potato masher and go at it girlfriend

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From: sapphire.dragon[at]iname.com (Sapphire)
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 18:17:22 GMT
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A couple of weeks ago, I set out to make mashed potatoes for the first
time in the house I now live in. I realized (once the potatoes were
ready to be mashed) that I don't own a potato masher - I've always
borrowed one from my mom or whatever roommate I happened to be living
with. So I improvised. I used one of those pastry thingies to get the
potatoes started, and a whisk to finish it off once they were in
smaller pieces. Worked great. I add a little bit of milk and butter,
and minced garlic and oregano. Yummm.

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From: moonwolf[at]ici.net (Robbyn)
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 98 23:02:10 GMT
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Sapphire wrote:
>So I improvised. I used one of those pastry thingies to get the
>potatoes started, and a whisk to finish it off once they were in
>smaller pieces. Worked great.

LOL.  Sapphire, I have used a potato masher to cut shortening into flour when 
I didn't have (or couldn't find) the pastry thingy.

Robbyn (great minds...)

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From: scav[at]avsia.com (Sally Wallace)
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 1998 14:51:10 GMT
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Robbyn wrote:
>  Sapphire, I have used a potato masher to cut shortening into flour when 
>I didn't have (or couldn't find) the pastry thingy.

Wow! And I've been using my biscuit cutter ever since my pastry thingy died! 
This has set me to thinking...should I try cutting the biscuits out with my 
potato masher now?

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From: Kris 
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 1998 10:17:17 -0000
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Heck, I've been using the potato masher to crush crackers for meatloaf for
about a  year now!  I dont even own a pastry thingie!
In a pinch, with no potato masher, let them cool, and grab 'em with your
hands and mush them all up!  This is especially great if you feel like
reliving your childhood!

p.s. - just dont let anyone see ya doing it or they probably won't eat them!
;-)

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From: ndooley[at]blue.weeg.uiowa.edu (nancy dooley)
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 1998 18:36:56 GMT
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Sally Wallace wrote:
>Wow! And I've been using my biscuit cutter ever since my pastry thingy died! 
>This has set me to thinking...should I try cutting the biscuits out with my 
>potato masher now?

Tip:  Get a new pastry thingie (cutter) and use it to make egg salad -
really chops up those hard boiled eggs nicely.  Not too mushy, not too
big - just right, said the Little Red Hen (who ought to know, really).

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From: HankHill[at]Whatinhehell!.com (Octarat)
Date: Sat, 03 Oct 1998 13:40:43 GMT
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One mistake cooks often make is over cooking the potatoes to be mashed!
Boil cut up potatoes for only 18 minutes. Mash them by hand and add
whipping cream and real butter. 
Unhealthy?, Yep. 

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Yuck!- was  Homemade Mashed Potatoes
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From: Steve Kramer 
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 22:43:22 GMT
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Bob Y. wrote:
> Roger that! The smoothest, fluffiest mashed potatoes result from using 
>a potato ricer.

Am I the only person in the world who can't stand creamy mashed
potatoes? I can't think of a common food I care for less! The creamier
the yuckier! Use it for hanging wallpaper. Give me a good 'crushed'
potato anytime. Just one or two presses with the back of a fork to break
the potato into managable pieces, cover with butter, gravy, or sour
cream, and enjoy. But riced, whipped potatoes? Un uh. No thanks!

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From: moonwolf[at]ici.net (Robbyn)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 98 00:14:55 GMT
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>Am I the only person in the world who can't stand creamy mashed
>potatoes?

No - you're not alone - I like 'em chunky too.  That way I know there are 
real potatoes in there and have something to bite.  Tastes better too.

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From: May's Pearls of Wisdom 
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 19:44:03 -0700
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I like crushed potatoes too...but if I'm eating mashed potatoes I want the
sans lumps.  To me they are two different methods of preparing potatoes.

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From: myee[at]uclink4.berkeley.edu (Millicent Yee)
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 17:31:17 -0800
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> Am I the only person in the world who can't stand creamy mashed
> potatoes?

No, Steve you are NOT alone.  The creamier, the gummier, the yuckier!

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From: shaitan[at]macwhiz.com (Heather Allen)
Date: 14 Sep 1998 17:50:18 PDT
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Steve, 

I don't like whipped or beaten potatoes.  That is what I like about the
ricer.  It doesn't activate the glutens and make it a sticky gluey mess. 
I rice, add a tad of sour cream, a bit of butter, a teeny bit of salt,
gently shake the bowl, and serve.  They're not all creamy and icky.  I've
never used a food mill for the potatoes, I don't know how they come out,
but I've always *thought* that it would be too fine and end up being
gluey.  However, I also don't use boiled potatoes for my mashed potatoes. 
I use baked.  The flavor seems greatly improved. 

Heather A. - to each their own

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From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 15 Sep 1998 02:30:08 GMT
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Heather Allen writes:

>I don't like whipped or beaten potatoes.  That is what I like about the
>ricer.  It doesn't activate the glutens and make it a sticky gluey mess.

No gluten in a potato.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Yuck!- was Homemade Mashed Potatoes
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From: Melissa 
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 02:14:03 GMT
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>  Give me a good 'crushed'
> potato anytime. Just one or two presses with the back of a fork to break
> the potato into managable pieces, 

Thought my daughter was the only one like this.  She refuses to eat mashed
potatoes if they've been riced or whipped.  They must be mashed by hand and
not too much of that.  Her motto seems to be - no lumps...no eat.  She's
married now so I can whip them like I like now.

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From: harvey[at]bennettengineering.com (Harvey Bennett)
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 1998 05:57:13 GMT
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brandy76@my-dejanews.com wrote:
>Thought my daughter was the only one like this.  She refuses to eat mashed
>potatoes if they've been riced or whipped.  They must be mashed by hand and
>not too much of that.  Her motto seems to be - no lumps...no eat. 

Nope- lots of us. I use a mixer because I like them smooth, but add
almost no milk and only a little butter.  If the potatoes didn't stick
to the bowl, you should be able to stick a fork in them and pick up
the whole mass.  Nice thick and heavy.

Sort of like the Red Dwarf episode where he wanted mashed potatoes
with 1 quart of heavy cream and 2 pounds of butter 

BTW, my wife claims she knew we were meant for each other when we went
to her grandmothers and I loved the potatoes. guess how they were
fixed

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Homemade Mashed Potatoes - use buttermilk
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From: autopen[at]autopen.com (Laurel Shimer)
Date: Sat, 03 Oct 1998 16:51:43 -0700
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I realize the current vogue in mashed potatoes is minimal cooking and
minimal air. I prefer them cooked intensely and beaten with lots of air.
Being a 50's 60's child that makes 'em taste right to me. But an old
fashioned potato masher will do in a pinch.

BTW I beat mine w/ buttermilk and skip the butter/margarine and or milk.
People pickier than me like them - but I never tell.

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From: bourget[at]netcom.com (Anne Bourget)
Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 00:10:42 GMT
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Yes, I also add buttermilk to my mashed potatoes. But I also add butter 
and lots of freshly ground pepper. Depending on what I am serving them 
with I often add horseradish as well. Yum, yum.

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From: moosmeat[at]yahoo.com (moosemeat)
Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 08:13:35 LOCAL
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> Depending on what I am serving them 
>with I often add horseradish as well. Yum, yum.

You better start reading some of those cook books Ann, it seems to me that 
putting horseradish in mashed potatoes would as sacrilegious as putting catsup 
on Grape Nuts. 

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From: Kristin Satterlee 
Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 10:57:49 -0500
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moosemeat wrote:
> You better start reading some of those cook books Ann, it seems to me that 
> putting horseradish in mashed potatoes would as sacrilegious as putting catsup 
> on Grape Nuts. 

	I dunno, sounds good to me!

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From: Rick Marinelli 
Date: Mon, 05 Oct 1998 14:14:28 GMT
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moosemeat wrote:
>You better start reading some of those cook books Ann, it seems to me that 
>putting horseradish in mashed potatoes would as sacrilegious as putting catsup 
>on Grape Nuts. 

It's "ketchup," and I'll put it on my Grape Nuts if I want to... :)


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