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Subject: Rich mashed potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: kbell12345[at]aol.com (KBELL12345)
Date: 21 Nov 1998 21:46:10 GMT
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Lately at restaurants, I have been getting absolutely wonderfully rich mashed
potatoes.  Does anyone know the secret of what makes them so rich - do they use
cream or evaporated milk or what? 

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From: brawnybear[at]netscape.net (Mr. Bill)
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 21:56:54 GMT
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Probably real potatoes.  

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From: Natasha Chen Christensen 
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 15:23:30 -0800
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I think that they use lots of real butter and cream.  Sometimes, my mother
in law uses sour cream instead of milk, and then you have really rich, yummy
mashed potatoes.  Also, after draining your potatoes, let them sit in the
pot with the heat on so that all the water evaporates before you add the
dairy products.

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From: Mary Gorman 
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 1998 19:05:13 -0600
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I make absolutely scrumptious garlic mashed potatoes (my father-in-law,
who's the pickiest food person I know, LOVES them) by boiling peeled, cut-up
potatoes and peeled garlic cloves until they're mashable, draining them, and
drying them out a little by putting them back on the stove over low heat for
a minute or so.  Meanwhile, I heat up some heavy cream and a little butter,
just until the butter melts.  Then I whip the potatoes with the cream/butter
mixture, and season with salt and pepper.  Very rich, creamy, and yummy!

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From: justanh[at]aol.com (JUST AN H)
Date: 22 Nov 1998 04:28:09 GMT
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I learned how to make rich and creamy mashed potatoes as a child by watching my
German mother prepare them back in the 1960s.  She'd boil whole, unpeeled
potatoes until they were tender.  (About 40-45 minutes.)  When they were done,
I'd pull a kitchen chair up to the sink, climb up on it and watch her prepare
them.

In short, drain the potatoes and peel them by spearing each carefully with a
fork and peeling with a knife.  (Peel carefully over the sink, since the
potatoes will be hot ... and fragile!)  Place peeled potatoes in a mixer bowl.

After peeling potatoes, melt 1/2 stick butter in 1/4 cup milk.  Add to
potatoes, sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste, and whip with an electic
mixer.  (Don't mix too long, or the mashed potatoes will take on the
consistency of dough.)

As you may have guessed, it's the addition of a small amount of milk (or cream)
that causes mashed potatoes to be rich and creamy.

For fluffier and lighter mashed potatoes, omit the milk (or cream) and mash
them by hand with a potato masher.

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From: Liz Hug 
Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 09:27:18 -0500
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I recently saw a recipe in our local paper for rich mashed potatoes
using cream cheese.  Maybe this is what you're tasting?

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From: Joyce 
Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 14:46:48 GMT
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I don't now what they are doing with the potatoes in the restaurants,
but I have a good recipe you might like to try.

Red Skinned Potatoes

Scrub skins, (leave on) cut in half, boil, drain.
Mash with sour cream, little butter, salt and pepper.

Very good served with pork.

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From: Rich Tester 
Date: 23 Nov 1998 00:20:53 GMT
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Joyce wrote:
> Red Skinned Potatoes

Some places are using fancy potatoes, such as yukon gold, instead of
regular potatoes.  I like them much better, myself.  I have also been
served mashed ptotatoes made with buttermilk, instead of milk or cream.
The result is very rich and tasty.

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From: kroes[at]wmich.edu (Nancy A. Kroes)
Date: 24 Nov 98 13:49:28 EST
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Joyce writes:
> Scrub skins, (leave on) cut in half, boil, drain.
> Mash with sour cream, little butter, salt and pepper.

I do similarly, only I don't leave all of the skin on, only about
half and I add a bit of dried basil to my potatoes mashed with 
butter and sour cream.  I find they go well will *everything*
that way!

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From: Joyce and Bruce 
Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 23:35:51 GMT
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Great idea, I have fresh basil in the garden, thanks for the tip.

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From: Mimi Hiller 
Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 14:14:03 -0700
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For Rich Tester:

I agree with the other posters, but wanted to add that the kind of
potato you use has a lot to do with the richness and texture.  I use red
potatoes, well-scrubbed and unpeeled.

For the person who adds peeled garlic to the pot when cooking the
potatoes, forget peeling them.  When they're cooked, all you have to do
is squeeze them out of their skins...and they ARE delicious.

And whatever you add (butter, milk, cream, etc.), make sure they're
warmed up first.

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From: Michael Sierchio 
Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 14:46:26 -0800
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I bake potatoes for mashing, then put them through a ricer while
still hot (helps to have asbestos fingers).  And it's the only
thing I use russets for (other than gnocchi).  Oh yeah,  no
need for butter if you use cream instead of milk ;-)

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From: Elizabeth Falkner 
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 02:41:00 GMT
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Mashed potatoes MUST be made with a pinch of mace.  I used to add as
much cream and butter as the potatoes would hold BUT now...sigh...

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From: Mark Kilinski 
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 13:35:01 -0500
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Yes, they probably use cream and butter.  There is a trick to it, however.
In order to get the potatos to absorb enough cream and butter they must be
dried first.  I do this by mashing them on the stove top after draining
(med. heat) for a couple of minutes.  They'll sizzle as the water comes out.
Then, add a cup of cream and 1/2 stick of butter along with some salt and
white pepper (per 2 - 3 lbs. potatos).  No need to heat the cream and butter
since you're doing the mashing on the stovetop.  If you don't dry the
potatos first, they'll get mushy before you can add enough cream to make
them rich.  Also, I find that Yukon Golds and most red skinned potatos have
a good balance between waxiness and starchiness when mashing.  Note that if
you bake and rice the potatos (a different but also a great way to make
them) the above doesn't apply.

For a variation make potatos as above and add the butter, salt and pepper.
Then use 8 oz. sour cream instead of heavy cream and add about 2 Tbl.
snipped chives.  You can also leave the skins on.  This is how the
restaurants make the currently popular "smashed" potatos.

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From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 14:42:53 -0500
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It had never crossed my mind to do so before, but someone here posted
that they freeze mashed potatoes, I decided to give it a try.  Thanks
to whoever suggested that, it really worked out great.

I just happened to have a big bag of potatoes (the 10 pound bags were
the only decent looking ones available), and not especially fond of 
having them hang around (I once forgot I'd put potatoes in a cabinet,
and it wasn't until I tried to find the source of an relentless 
fruit fly outbreak, did I find these liquified potatoes ... ugh!!!!),
I decided to try it.

I made them and froze them in portions.  What the heck, if it didn't
work out, no great loss.  I made them lighter than I usually do so that
I could add a little cream or butter when I reheated them to make them
taste fresher.  They were perfect.  Next time I'll just mash them and
freeze them plain.  Doctor them up when I want to use them.

I reheated them in the microwave.  I found they reheated more evenly 
when I, halfway through, used a spoon to sort of line the bowl with 
them, in other words, make a mashed potato bowl within the mixing bowl.


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