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Subject: Make-ahead potatos recipe?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: JJ 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 15:50:21 GMT
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Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The 
oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day 
before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old 
mashed potatoes are not an option.
Thanks,
Joe 

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From: merryb 
Date: 5 Apr 2007 08:53:25 -0700
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Twice baked potatoes made with scallions or chives & bacon, topped
with cheese.

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From: JJ 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 16:02:53 GMT
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merryb wrote:
> Twice baked potatoes made with scallions or chives & bacon, topped
> with cheese.

Is that make-able ahead of time?

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From: merryb 
Date: 5 Apr 2007 09:18:51 -0700
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JJ wrote:
> Is that make-able ahead of time?

Definitely! Bake your spuds the day before. Do you have a recipe for
these? If not, here's how I make them. Bake your spuds- cool a little
for easier handling. Cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out pulp, add sour
cream, butter, s & p, bacon bits, chives, and a little milk or cream
if necessary- mash well and put back in potato shells- top with
shredded cheddar. At this point, you can put them in the fridge. The
next day, or whenever you plan on using them, pop them in the oven for
about 20-30 minutes @ 350 or so until hot.

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From: MareCat 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 14:15:49 -0400
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merryb wrote:
> Definitely! Bake your spuds the day before. Do you have a recipe for
> these? If not, here's how I make them. Bake your spuds- cool a little
> for easier handling. Cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out pulp, add sour
> cream, butter, s & p, bacon bits, chives, and a little milk or cream
> if necessary- mash well and put back in potato shells- top with
> shredded cheddar. At this point, you can put them in the fridge. The
> next day, or whenever you plan on using them, pop them in the oven for
> about 20-30 minutes @ 350 or so until hot.

I add the cheese (usually cheddar, but I also like to use a mix of different 
cheeses) to the potato mixture, rather than topping with the cheese. I also 
add scallions and a liberal amount of Penzey's Fox Point seasoning.

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From: elaine 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 20:07:40 -0400
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merryb wrote:
> Definitely! Bake your spuds the day before. Do you have a recipe for
> these? If not, here's how I make them. Bake your spuds- cool a little
> for easier handling. Cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out pulp, add sour
> cream, butter, s & p, bacon bits, chives, and a little milk or cream
> if necessary- mash well and put back in potato shells- top with
> shredded cheddar. At this point, you can put them in the fridge. The
> next day, or whenever you plan on using them, pop them in the oven for
> about 20-30 minutes @ 350 or so until hot.

Cool, I just got of the phone with my SIL - I was going to make scalloped 
potatoes.  As per usual with ham.  D'you suppose 20 baked twice potatoes 
would take up a lot of room in the oven.

Who cares, think I'll go with this.

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From: Sheldon 
Date: 5 Apr 2007 09:24:52 -0700
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

If your oven is on all day anyway why can't you make a big panful of
roast potatoes... pop em onto the very top shelf an hour and a half
before you're going to serve.

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From: pfoley 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 17:06:29 GMT
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

A casserole of Au Gratin Potatoes goes very good with ham.

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From: "" 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 15:06:57 -0700
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pfoley wrote:
>A casserole of Au Gratin Potatoes goes very good with ham.

I'd second that idea.
There was a recipe posted here a few weeks ago;
Takes 10 minutes to prep, and doesn't tie up the oven.

Mix;  2 lb pkg frozen home fries  ( thawed )
         2 c shredded cheddar
         1 can cream of chicken soup
         ???    chopped onion
         optional sour cream.

Put in a crock pot, and cook for 4 > 6 hours.

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From: pfoley 
Date: Fri, 06 Apr 2007 14:02:31 GMT
--------
 wrote:
> I'd second that idea.
> There was a recipe posted here a few weeks ago;

I usually make a lot of white sauce and while it is very hot, add medium
size package of Velveeta Cheese , which melts perfectly into it.  I pour the
sauce over the potatoes in a  bake it in an 9" X 11" casserole dish. I lay
sliced Velveeta cheese over the top of the casserole.   Sometimes I pre boil
the potatoes and then bake the casserole for 30 minutes or so until the
cheese on top browns a little.  If I use raw very thinly sliced potatoes I
cook for one hour or a little more until tender.  If it browns too much I
cover with foil.  Another nice dish with leftovers is to make a potato au
gratin and add chunks of leftover ham mixed in and bake that way.  It is
just wonderful. Peas go good with that dish.

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From: kilikini 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 12:24:04 -0500
--------
JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

Did you buy the potatoes, yet?  A simple option might be getting some new
potatoes, boiling them, and adding butter and dill, although that's not very
elegant.  Everything I'm thinking of uses the oven, unfortunately.  Maybe
merryb's option of twice-baked might be the ticket.  Good luck, and let us
know what you decided to do.

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 11:40:39 -0500
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kilikini wrote:
> Did you buy the potatoes, yet?  A simple option might be getting some
> new potatoes, boiling them, and adding butter and dill, although
> that's not very elegant.  Everything I'm thinking of uses the oven,
> unfortunately.  Maybe merryb's option of twice-baked might be the
> ticket.  Good luck, and let us know what you decided to do.

I'm not sure about elegant looking but I love new potatoes with butter and
dill weed!  Sometimes simplest is best.

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From: James Silverton 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 12:55:12 -0400
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Jill wrote:
> I'm not sure about elegant looking but I love new potatoes with butter and
> dill weed!  Sometimes simplest is best.

New potatoes or small ones like fingerlings can be nuked very 
quite successfully if you want to avoid the regular oven. I 
prefer parsley to dill for potatoes but to each their own!

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From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Fri, 06 Apr 2007 14:47:35 GMT
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James Silverton wrote:
>New potatoes or small ones like fingerlings can be nuked very 
>quite successfully if you want to avoid the regular oven. I 
>prefer parsley to dill for potatoes but to each their own!

Fingerlings are not always readily found all over the US.  I've seen
them a regular stock item at Sainsbury's and Tescoes in Britain but
not so here in Sacramento.  I often find them at farmers' markets
though.

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From: sf
Date: Fri, 06 Apr 2007 11:10:04 -0700
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TammyM wrote:
>Fingerlings are not always readily found all over the US.  I've seen
>them a regular stock item at Sainsbury's and Tescoes in Britain but
>not so here in Sacramento.  I often find them at farmers' markets
>though.

Smaller potatoes (of the fingerling type you want to use) cut into
pieces work just as well.... and all prettied up with a smattering of
freshly chopped parsley makes it festive as well.

Personally, I wouldn't use "elegant" and potato in the same sentence.
If the OP want's elegant, a pretty dish will take care of that.

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From: King's Crown 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 12:05:06 -0700
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kilikini wrote:
> Did you buy the potatoes, yet?  A simple option might be getting some new
> potatoes, boiling them, and adding butter and dill, although that's not very
> elegant.  Everything I'm thinking of uses the oven, unfortunately.  Maybe
> merryb's option of twice-baked might be the ticket.  Good luck, and let us
> know what you decided to do.

I see new potatoes used at elegant dinners frequently.  They've usually 
taken a potato peeler and have done one ring of peel around the middle.  Not 
sure why, but it always looks nice.  And these could be warmed up in a 
crockpot.

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From: kilikini 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 15:30:45 -0500
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King's Crown wrote:
> I see new potatoes used at elegant dinners frequently.  They've
> usually taken a potato peeler and have done one ring of peel around
> the middle.  Not sure why, but it always looks nice.  And these could
> be warmed up in a crockpot.

I had a thought to make the new potatoes more elegant!  With your idea of
the peel around the middle, what if you tied a green onion around the peel
mark?  Maybe I'm just being weird.  Call me crazy.

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From: King's Crown 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 20:35:48 -0700
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kilikini wrote:
> I had a thought to make the new potatoes more elegant!  With your idea of
> the peel around the middle, what if you tied a green onion around the peel
> mark?  Maybe I'm just being weird.  Call me crazy.

Or tie a chive... I like it kili.

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From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Fri, 06 Apr 2007 14:49:45 GMT
--------
kilikini wrote:
>I had a thought to make the new potatoes more elegant!  With your idea of
>the peel around the middle, what if you tied a green onion around the peel
>mark?  Maybe I'm just being weird.  Call me crazy.

Yer nuts ;-)  Too much work.  Little tiny potatoes with a bitta buddah
and snipped chives are 'elegant' enough even for a State dinner!  At
least IMO :-)

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From: cathy 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 17:26:29 GMT
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JJ wrote:
>Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The 
>oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day 
>before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old 
>mashed potatoes are not an option.

I make this every Thanksgiving, and for most family dinners. Bake a
batch of potatoes (however many you think you'll need for your crowd).
Cut in half, scoop out insides into a large mixing bowl. Then, for
about every 2 pounds of potatoes add one 16oz container sour cream and
one package dry onion soup mix. Whip potatoes until everything is
incorporated and creamy. Pour into baking dish, cover and refrigerate
until ready to bake. Bake uncovered at 350  for anywhere from 30 to 60
minutes depending on how large the dish is. Potatoes will brown on top
and be kinda puffy when done. 

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From: prfesser[at]hotmail.com
Date: 5 Apr 2007 10:49:37 -0700
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

Hash-Brown Casserole isn't terribly elegant but it sure gets et up...

1 (2 lb.) bag frozen hash brown potatoes, thawed
1 pint sour cream
1 c. chopped onion + 2 T. butter
1 can cream of mushroom soup
2 c. shredded sharp cheddar cheese
2 c. corn flake crumbs
1/4 c. butter or bacon drippings, melted
Several slices bacon, crumbled (optional)

Saute onion in butter til translucent.  Add soup and sour cream, mix.
Add cheese and potatoes, toss to mix. Turn into nonstick 13 x 9 pan.
Mix melted butter or bacon drippings (and bacon) with crumbs and
sprinkle on top. Bake at 350 degrees 1 hour.  (If fresh shredded
potatoes are used, withhold topping, cover with foil, bake 1 hour,
then top and bake another hour.)  Reheats in oven pretty well.

Best -- Terry

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From: MareCat 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 14:15:55 -0400
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prfesser wrote:
> Hash-Brown Casserole isn't terribly elegant but it sure gets et up...

I've made something similar for potlucks and used a Crockpot for it. No oven 
required.

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 13:24:02 -0500
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MareCat wrote:
> I've made something similar for potlucks and used a Crockpot for it.
> No oven required.

Same here, Mary!  Crock pots are great for pot lucks and hash brown
casserole always goes over well.  So do those grape jelly meatballs Nancy is
famous for LOL

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From: Emma Thackery 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 13:38:42 -0500
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The 
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day 
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old 
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

I'm thinking gnocchi with browned butter & parsley.  Fresh basil would 
be great too if you can get it.

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From: Dimitri 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 20:02:06 GMT
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The oven 
> is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day before 
> and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old mashed 
> potatoes are not an option.

Your crock-pot or slow cooker is your savior.

Any roasted potato dish can be warmed from the fridge and kept warm in the 
crock-pot.

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From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2007 13:38:57 -0700
--------
JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The 
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day 
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old 
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

Pommes Anna warms up nicely, and if one sprinkles cheese between the 
layers of potatoes it is called Pommes de terre Voisin.

Pommes de terre Duchese au Chester

Prepare a potato croquette mixture adding 3 & 1/2 ounces grated cheshire 
cheese per 2 & 1/4 pound of potato mixture.

Mould into small round flat cakes, place on a buttered tray and brush 
with beaten egg.  Place a  thin slice of cheshire cheese on each and 
place in the oven for approximately 7 - 8 minutes before serving.

[note; i have never seen "cheshire cheese" so i use cheddar in the above]

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From: Serene-O-Matic 
Date: Sun, 08 Apr 2007 17:20:13 -0700
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JJ wrote:
> Anybody have a simple but elegant looking, make ahead potato recipe?  The 
> oven is going to be full on Sunday and I need something I can make the day 
> before and throw in the oven to reheat after the ham comes out.  Plain old 
> mashed potatoes are not an option.

I would make twice-baked potatoes.  Mash the insides of halved baked 
potatoes with butter, cheese, chopped green onions, parsley.  Pipe 
back into potato skins with a fancy pastry tip.  Bake at 400F until 
the top gets all nice and brown.


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