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Subject: Crimes against potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:55:00 +0200
--------
This was prompted by a neighbour who threatened to invite me to a meal 
involving "mousseline", a French chemical product that is supposed to 
resemble mashed potatoes and doesn't .  This lead me to considering what 
is the worst thing that you can do to a real potato.

My top 2 would be

1) Microwaved spuds that are called "baked"

2) Potatoes that get cooked and then get "pureed" in mixers to remove 
all traces of texture.

neither of these resemble the dishes theyare supposed to be (in my 
'umble opinion) .  Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

============================

From: BOBOBOnoBO® fka Food Snob <CLASSACT[at]BRICK.NET>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 05:07:20 -0700
--------
Yes, when Steak'n Shake French fries sit for 10 minutes, then the
employee puts them back in the fryer to get them hot again.  I've seen
this with my own eyes.

--Bryan

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:56:12 GMT
--------
BOBOBOnoBO® fka Food Snob wrote:
> Yes, when Steak'n Shake French fries sit for 10 minutes, then the
> employee puts them back in the fryer to get them hot again.  I've seen
> this with my own eyes.

How do they taste?  One of the methods of making a good fried potato is to 
do it in two steps.  Fry, cool, fry again to crisp.   The second frying may 
actually improve them :) 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 09:31:45 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> How do they taste?  One of the methods of making a good fried potato
> is to do it in two steps.  Fry, cool, fry again to crisp.   The
> second frying may actually improve them :)

I'm piggybacking on your post, Ed (sorry!)  I worked at Steak N Shake when I
was in college.  I never saw the fries "sit for 10 minutes" and never saw
anyone put fries back in the fryer.  I can't speak to what they may do now
but back then they didn't drop fries until an order came in.

They didn't have heat lamps, didn't make burgers or fries ahead of time.  We
(as servers) would stand at the end of the counter and yell something like
this: "One steak with cheese, mayo, pickles, tomato" or "Two double steaks
no cheese, mayo, no pickles, lettuce, tomato".  They weren't given "tickets"
to cook from and they didn't cook anything ahead of time.  Of course, that
was almost 30 years ago.  No telling what they do now.

But yes, twice fried potatoes usually are the best.  I haven't owned a deep
fryer since around 1995 but I definitely used that method when I made fries
:)

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:57:13 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> But yes, twice fried potatoes usually are the best.  I haven't owned a deep
> fryer since around 1995 but I definitely used that method when I made fries

Ever make twice baked potatoes?
That's a recipe I've not tried yet, but they do look good!
I've considered trying them for a dinner party as they can make a pretty 
presentation if done right.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 10:24:46 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Ever make twice baked potatoes?

Oh absolutely!  I've often made twice baked potatoes.  Add some cheese,
crumbled bacon, chives if you like when you spoon the mixture back into the
potato shells.  Yum!

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:30:50 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Oh absolutely!  I've often made twice baked potatoes.  Add some
> cheese, crumbled bacon, chives if you like when you spoon the mixture
> back into the potato shells.  Yum!

Home made twiced baked potatoes is a good reason to get outa bed...But 
only if you rough smash the potatoes innards...Don't make them whipped!

Mix in cheese, diced cooked mushroom, diced cooked red bell peppera and 
some caramelized onin...top with more shredded cheese and return to the 
oven till the cheese melts. Um Um good!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:49:28 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> Home made twiced baked potatoes is a good reason to get outa bed...But 
> only if you rough smash the potatoes innards...Don't make them whipped!
> 
> Mix in cheese, diced cooked mushroom, diced cooked red bell peppera and 
> some caramelized onin...top with more shredded cheese and return to the 
> oven till the cheese melts. Um Um good!

There seem to be a number of ways to prepare these. :-)

I'd probably keep it simple with some garlic, jack cheese, bacon bits 
and some chives, then top with grated parmesan maybe?

Diced cooked mushrooms sound interesting but I prefer to serve mushrooms 
sliced or whole as a veggie by themselves most of the time.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:30:04 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>Home made twiced baked potatoes is a good reason to get outa bed...But 
>only if you rough smash the potatoes innards...Don't make them whipped!
>
>Mix in cheese, diced cooked mushroom, diced cooked red bell peppera and 
>some caramelized onin...top with more shredded cheese and return to the 
>oven till the cheese melts. Um Um good!

That's too much crud for me.  I prefer them as a side dish, not a the
meal itself - so I the innards are "mashed" (they puff up very nicely
that way too) with a sprinkling of grated cheese on top.  The cheese
can be anything from romano to cheddar.

============================

From: Giusi <decobabe[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 20:16:00 +0200
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> Home made twiced baked potatoes is a good reason to get outa bed...But 
> only if you rough smash the potatoes innards...Don't make them whipped!
> 
> Mix in cheese, diced cooked mushroom, diced cooked red bell peppera and 
> some caramelized onin...top with more shredded cheese and return to the 
> oven till the cheese melts. Um Um good!

Uh-huh... mustard, cottage cheese, bacon, finely minced onion, salt and 
pepper.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 13:16:50 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Ever make twice baked potatoes?

I'm the queen of twice baked; it's the only way, AFAIC.  To my potato
insides I usually add butter, sour cream, chopped broccoli, bacon and
cheese.  (Or what ever else is appropriate that needs to go.)  Stuff back in
and broil.  They come out cheesy, gooey and yummy.  Oh, but wait a bit
before serving; they're really hot!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:03:07 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> I'm the queen of twice baked; it's the only way, AFAIC.  To my potato
> insides I usually add butter, sour cream, chopped broccoli, bacon and
> cheese.  (Or what ever else is appropriate that needs to go.)  Stuff back in
> and broil.  They come out cheesy, gooey and yummy.  Oh, but wait a bit
> before serving; they're really hot!

Hm, I have some brocolli that needs using up...  ;-)

I'd have to go shopping tho'. The only potatoes in the house are a small 
bag of baby reds for steaming!

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:24:44 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Ever make twice baked potatoes?

I do it quite a bit.  It's actually a "plan ahead" meal.  "Plan" on
twice baked because you put twice as many baked potatoes in the oven
as you'll need for today's meal.  Actually, I put more than twice the
amount I need because I like mine mounded up.  As a result, you'll
also have a future appetizer.... baked potato skins.  Remember those?
Just grate some cheddar cheese on them and broil.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 12:27:39 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> I do it quite a bit.  It's actually a "plan ahead" meal.  "Plan" on
> twice baked because you put twice as many baked potatoes in the oven
> as you'll need for today's meal.  Actually, I put more than twice the
> amount I need because I like mine mounded up.  As a result, you'll
> also have a future appetizer.... baked potato skins.  Remember those?
> Just grate some cheddar cheese on them and broil.

Potato skins with crumbled bacon topped with cheese are great!  Haven't done
those in a while.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:08:41 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Potato skins with crumbled bacon topped with cheese are great!  Haven't done
> those in a while.

I think that one of my most sinfully favorite treats in the whole world 
(even over and above sweets) is to bake a spud, drown it in butter, 
shredded cheese and bacon bits and scoop it all out to eat.

Then for dessert, take the skin, tear it into bite sized strips and roll 
each strip up with a bit of COLD butter.

Eat.

Orgasmically delicious!

Amazing how we can take a healthy food and turn it into heart attack on 
a plate. ;-d

I've honestly not eaten them that way tho' for a good 6 years.

But I'm sooooo sorely tempted.

Might give me incentive to stay on my diet. A treat for a set number of 
lbs. lost maybe. <g>

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 19:54:57 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Amazing how we can take a healthy food and turn it into heart attack on 
> a plate. ;-d

Yeah, I do the same thing with salads. There is nothing healthy about it 
by the time I am finished with it.  It is delish, though. lol

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 02:08:38 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Yeah, I do the same thing with salads. There is nothing healthy about it 
> by the time I am finished with it.  It is delish, though. lol

But it still gives you fiber! ;-D

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:04:45 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> I do it quite a bit.  It's actually a "plan ahead" meal.  "Plan" on
> twice baked because you put twice as many baked potatoes in the oven
> as you'll need for today's meal.  Actually, I put more than twice the
> amount I need because I like mine mounded up.  As a result, you'll
> also have a future appetizer.... baked potato skins.  Remember those?
> Just grate some cheddar cheese on them and broil.

Well, I hesitate to mention this, but for the lazy, you can get them 
pre-prepared and frozen...

Would I do it?

HELL no. I'm too sensitive to oversalting. :-)

I've not dragged out the table top oven in awhile. Wonder how they would 
do in there?

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 14:01:58 -0400
--------
Jill wrote:
>    We
> (as servers) would stand at the end of the counter and yell something like
> this: "One steak with cheese, mayo, pickles, tomato" or "Two double steaks
> no cheese, mayo, no pickles, lettuce, tomato".  They weren't given "tickets"
> to cook from and they didn't cook anything ahead of time.  Of course, that
> was almost 30 years ago.  No telling what they do now.

That's how they do it at Waffle House. It is kind of cool to sit at the 
counter and watch how they cook pulls a plate out and places odd things 
on it as a memory cue to the order. For example one cube of ham, egg, 
a slice of cheese, etc will remind him as he gets to that order to make 
it a ham omelet. I think where he places the egg on the plate might also 
cue him to how it is fixed....it is just fascinating to me to watch.
When I get off some mornings after a long 13 hour shift I don't want 
*breakfast* food...I sometimes am craving a hamburger and hashbrowns. 
Waffle House can get me that at 8 in the AM. And you can't beat their 
sweetea! When I'm in the mood for fries, I go to Huddle House instead.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:51:13 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> How do they taste?  One of the methods of making a good fried potato is to 
> do it in two steps.  Fry, cool, fry again to crisp.   The second frying may 
> actually improve them :) 

I've heard that too, and have considered trying it with yam fries...

but so far the yam fries never lasted long enough to cool completely. <G>

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:54:34 -0400
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> How do they taste?  One of the methods of making a good fried potato is to 
> do it in two steps.  Fry, cool, fry again to crisp.   The second frying may 
> actually improve them :) 

Yup. that's how they're done when done from scratch, per Julia Child.

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 11:05:45 -0700
--------
BOBOBOnoBO(R) fka Food Snob wrote:
> Yes, when Steak'n Shake French fries sit for 10 minutes, then the
> employee puts them back in the fryer to get them hot again.  I've seen
> this with my own eyes.

The best fries are always fried twice.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:15:23 -0500
--------
Dan Abel said...
> The best fries are always fried twice.

I don't remember where I heard this but Burger King's fries are 
sprayed with a light coating of glycerin at the processing plant. 
Something about them having a crisper outside "crunch" after deep 
frying. I think it also had some cosmetic value. Better browning?

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 14:27:14 -0400
--------
Andy wrote:
> I don't remember where I heard this but Burger King's fries are 
> sprayed with a light coating of glycerin at the processing plant. 
> Something about them having a crisper outside "crunch" after deep 
> frying. I think it also had some cosmetic value. Better browning?

Burger King ruined their fries when they "reformulated" them to make 
them remain "crispy" (albeit tasteless) longer. They no longer even 
taste like potatoes to me. They're made of composite potatoes and other 
ingredients now, instead of just potatoes.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:17:19 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>Burger King ruined their fries when they "reformulated" them to make 
>them remain "crispy" (albeit tasteless) longer. They no longer even 
>taste like potatoes to me. They're made of composite potatoes and other 
>ingredients now, instead of just potatoes.

Isn't Burger King the one that puts a coating on FF that's similar to
what's on onion rings?  I like Burger King, but  I DON'T like their
FF!  Give me real fries from real potatoes.  Don't mess with them. 

============================

From: Miche <miche[at]myrealbox.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 00:16:21 +1200
--------
Steve Y wrote:
>  Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

Instant mashed "potatoes".

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 08:07:40 -0700
--------
Miche wrote:
> Instant mashed "potatoes".

If you knew how to properly prepare them you wouldn't think that.

Nothing the matter with instant, the major name brands are made from
better and fresher spuds than you can buy at the market.  Almost all
potatoes sold at markets are storage potatoes (and they're not even
the highest grade), they taste nothing like fresh dug, like how a
quality potato is supposed to taste.  It's just not possible to
prepare good mashed (or any other style) from storage potatoes.
Unless you grow your own or got some freshly dug from a local potato
farmer you haven't a clue how potatoes are supposed to taste...
potatoes age faster than corn... difference is that the sugar in corn
quickly turns to starch and the starch in potatoes even more quickly
turns to sugar.  The vast majority have never tasted a proper potato.
And with dehys the few pennies more for the major name brands makes a
huge difference... and of course if you rehydrate with your fercocktah
tap water, probably heated in that ancient scale laden teakettle that
hasn't been cleaned in thirty years, then WTF do you expect.

Storage potatoes simply do not have a flavor (or texture)
representitve of a fresh dug potato.  The big commercial processors do
all the "How to choose potatoes" for you, and they choose the best of
the best.  The spuds you buy at your market are often six months or
more out of the ground, they're hardly potatoes anymore.

<a href="http://www.ams.usda.gov/standards/potatoes.pdf">http://www.ams.usda.gov/standards/potatoes.pdf</a>

http://www.ams.usda.gov/howtobuy/potato.htm

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:55:21 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>If you knew how to properly prepare them you wouldn't think that.
>
>Nothing the matter with instant, the major name brands are made from
>better and fresher spuds than you can buy at the market. 

Glad you said that.  I've never had a problem with instand mashed.  I
haven't made them in ages just for eating, but when I did they tasted
fine to me.  I still keep a box on hand for thickening purposes.  It's
what I use to thicken white clam chowder.

============================

From: Phyllis Stone <nobody[at]msn.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 21:48:18 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> Glad you said that.  I've never had a problem with instand mashed.  I
> haven't made them in ages just for eating, but when I did they tasted
> fine to me.  I still keep a box on hand for thickening purposes.  It's
> what I use to thicken white clam chowder.

Didn't someone make a frozen mashed potato? I remember buying them and liked 
them but no one else in the family  did.

============================

From: Sharon <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 07:35:30 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
> Glad you said that.  I've never had a problem with instand mashed.  I
> haven't made them in ages just for eating, but when I did they tasted
> fine to me.  I still keep a box on hand for thickening purposes.  It's
> what I use to thicken white clam chowder.

   DH's mom and stepfather were really good home style cooks.  The made
really nice mashed potatoes.  Mine always sucked.  I asked them what the
secret was and it seemed so simple....mash, add butter, s and p, and
milk.
I kept trying and had no success, so started buying the boxed.  After
reading this ng for a few months, I decided to try extra hard to do it
right....heated the milk, added roasted garlic, seasonings and butter...
They tasted just like the boxed garlic mashed....lol...back to boxed.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:13:22 -0500
--------
Sharon said...
>    DH's mom and stepfather were really good home style cooks.  The made
> really nice mashed potatoes.  Mine always sucked.  I asked them what the
> secret was and it seemed so simple....mash, add butter, s and p, and
> milk.
> I kept trying and had no success, so started buying the boxed.  After
> reading this ng for a few months, I decided to try extra hard to do it
> right....heated the milk, added roasted garlic, seasonings and butter...
> They tasted just like the boxed garlic mashed....lol...back to boxed.

Sharon,

The boxed mashed potatoes are excessively processed with trans fats and 
plenty of sodium, additives, etc.

Also don't forget a typical serving size of boxed mashed potatoes is 1/2 
cup. Better double or triple up those nutritional values!

I don't know how the homemade/scratch nutritional values compare to boxed 
but you could certainly cut down on the sodium and additives by making 
homemade.

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:54:42 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> The boxed mashed potatoes are excessively processed with trans fats and
> plenty of sodium, additives, etc.

Mmm, no, they're not.  The instant spuds I have have Idaho potatoes, Mono 
and Diglycerides (to improve flavor) Fresheness protected by sodium 
bisulfite and BHT.  Not a speck of fat in them, trans or otherwise.  As 
prepared one serving (1/3 of a cup) contains 8g total fat,460g sodium, 370mg 
potassium, 19g total carbohydrates, and 3g protein.  One serving as boxed 
has 80 calories, as prepared 160.  It also says the sodium content without 
added salt per serving is 120mg.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:12:23 -0500
--------
Ms P said...
> Mmm, no, they're not.  The instant spuds I have have Idaho potatoes,
> Mono and Diglycerides (to improve flavor) Fresheness protected by sodium
> bisulfite and BHT.  Not a speck of fat in them, trans or otherwise.  As 
> prepared one serving (1/3 of a cup) contains 8g total fat,460g sodium,
> 370mg potassium, 19g total carbohydrates, and 3g protein.  One serving
> as boxed has 80 calories, as prepared 160.  It also says the sodium
> content without added salt per serving is 120mg.

How is any product with BHT in it good for you. It NEVER made it to the 
GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list. It's banned in many countries. It 
has caused cancer and tumors in rats at exceeded dosages. Even McDonald's 
doesn't use it "according to wiki" (take them with a grain of sodium).

Who eats 1/3 cup of mashed potatoes anyway?

You're not doing yourself any favors by eating that product, imho.

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:42:54 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> How is any product with BHT in it good for you. It NEVER made it to the
> GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list. It's banned in many countries. It
> has caused cancer and tumors in rats at exceeded dosages. Even McDonald's
> doesn't use it "according to wiki" (take them with a grain of sodium).
>
> Who eats 1/3 cup of mashed potatoes anyway?

Lots of products have BHT.

I eat about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of potatoes.  It's called portion control.

I am doing myself a big favor by eating instant mashed.  They don't 
skyrocket my blood sugar and make it stay high for 2 to 3 days like fresh 
potatoes do.  If I'm going to eat any potatoes at all I try and eat 
processed ones.  A real baked potato is a two or three times a year special 
treat.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:13:38 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:

> I am doing myself a big favor by eating instant mashed.  They don't 
> skyrocket my blood sugar and make it stay high for 2 to 3 days like fresh 
> potatoes do. 

That is interesting! You use a glucometer?
I've been avoiding potatoes for the most part, (they come under the 
heading of "treats") due to their glycemic index.

I happen to like potato flakes very much but have not bought them in 
years due to my current dietary lifestyle. 

> If I'm going to eat any potatoes at all I try and eat 
> processed ones.  A real baked potato is a two or three times a year special 
> treat.

Cool!

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:43:07 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:

> That is interesting! You use a glucometer?
> I've been avoiding potatoes for the most part, (they come under the
> heading of "treats") due to their glycemic index.

That's how I discovered potatoes keep my blood sugar high for two or three 
days after eating them.  I had stopped eating potatoes for the most part and 
then started eating them once a week or so.  I noticed that for two or three 
days after having a normal serving of potatoes my fasting reading would be 
10 to 15 points higher than it was the day before I had potatoes and then it 
would go back down after about three days.  And you know if your fasting 
reading starts out higher it'll only go up from there.

> I happen to like potato flakes very much but have not bought them in
> years due to my current dietary lifestyle.

Even though they don't keep my blood sugar higher for a couple of days I 
still put potato flakes in the not more than once a week catagory.  It is 
nice to be able to have mashed for dinner at least once in awhile.

Potato chips on the other hand don't raise my blood sugar more than most any 
thing else.  When they're sliced they lose most of the starch.


It really helps to keep a detailed food and glucose reading diary.  If I 
don't write it down I might not remember exactly what I had for breakfast! 
LOL  That way you'll eventually be able to figure out which foods skyrocket 
your blood sugar and which foods don't.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:36:11 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:
> It really helps to keep a detailed food and glucose reading diary.  If I 
> don't write it down I might not remember exactly what I had for breakfast! 
> LOL  That way you'll eventually be able to figure out which foods skyrocket 
> your blood sugar and which foods don't.

I kept a detailed food log for a year and a half on my doctors advice 
and added up the daily calories and the percentage of protein, carbs and 
fat, and the milligrams of sodium, and how I felt each day.

It was to track down food sensitivities for my IBS.

It was also extremely educational for learning low carbing. It's nice to 
actually learn about what you are eating. :-)

I'm not a diabetic, but I was headed towards type II being insulin 
resistant, so it's still important to learn this stuff.

For one thing, I've learned that Splenda raises my glucose from the 
fasting level of 90 to around 110 to 115, so contrary to popular belief, 
it's not totally free of the effects of a sugar.

I don't have a glucometer but being a lab tech and running the blood 
chemistry analyzer at night has it's perks. ;-) And I'm not afraid of 
needles.

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 13:09:31 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I kept a detailed food log for a year and a half on my doctors advice
> and added up the daily calories and the percentage of protein, carbs and
> fat, and the milligrams of sodium, and how I felt each day.
>
> It was to track down food sensitivities for my IBS.

> For one thing, I've learned that Splenda raises my glucose from the
> fasting level of 90 to around 110 to 115, so contrary to popular belief,
> it's not totally free of the effects of a sugar.

You really can track down all sorts of food sensitivities by keeping a food 
diary.

The Splenda thing is interesting.  It doesn't taste anything like sugar to 
me so I don't eat it anyway.  Sugar doesn't make my blood sugar go nearly as 
high as starch does anyway.  I can eat cookies and have a lower blood sugar 
than if I eat corn on the cob or a baked potato.

Once a summer I'll grill ribeyes and shrimp skewers and we'll have baked 
potato and corn on the cob with it.  Heaven.

Ms P  <------ off to eat birthday cake and ice cream.  Grandson is 3 this 
month! 

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:45:34 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:

> You really can track down all sorts of food sensitivities by keeping a food 
> diary.

Indeed!

> The Splenda thing is interesting.  It doesn't taste anything like sugar to 
> me so I don't eat it anyway.  Sugar doesn't make my blood sugar go nearly as 
> high as starch does anyway.  I can eat cookies and have a lower blood sugar 
> than if I eat corn on the cob or a baked potato.

That's interesting. Damn, I LOVE corn on the cob. :-(

> Ms P  <------ off to eat birthday cake and ice cream.  Grandson is 3 this 
> month! 

Happy B-day to the kiddo. :-)

============================

From: James Silverton <not.jim.silverton[at]verizon.not>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 20:03:50 GMT
--------
Ms P wrote:
> The Splenda thing is interesting.  It doesn't taste anything like sugar to 
> me so I don't eat it anyway.  Sugar doesn't make my blood sugar go nearly as 
> high as starch does anyway.  I can eat cookies and have a lower blood sugar 
> than if I eat corn on the cob or a baked potato.

 It's not too surprising that Splenda does not *taste* like 
sugar. It is mostly maltose which I quite like but, by itself, 
maltose is not very sweet.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 15:23:01 -0500
--------
James Silverton wrote:
>  It's not too surprising that Splenda does not *taste* like 
> sugar. It is mostly maltose which I quite like but, by itself, 
> maltose is not very sweet.

I actually like Splenda as it does taste like sugar to me, but evidently 
it is not truly a calorie free sweetener as claimed. Otherwise why would 
my glucose levels go up?

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 17:22:24 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I actually like Splenda as it does taste like sugar to me, but evidently 
> it is not truly a calorie free sweetener as claimed. Otherwise why would 
> my glucose levels go up?

Splenda does not have maltose in it.  It has maltodextrin, which is a 
carb used to provide bulk.  Dextrose is also used for bulk, and is a 
carb.  Splenda has 2 calories per tsp, which allows the label to show 
zero sugar and carbs.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 19:53:51 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Splenda does not have maltose in it.  It has maltodextrin, which is a 
> carb used to provide bulk.  Dextrose is also used for bulk, and is a 
> carb.  Splenda has 2 calories per tsp, which allows the label to show 
> zero sugar and carbs.

Thanks. That explains it. :-)
The typical FDA Liar laws?

The glucose spike is not drastic, but it's there!

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 20:56:37 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Thanks. That explains it. :-)
> The typical FDA Liar laws?
> 
> The glucose spike is not drastic, but it's there!

If you use Splenda, you might want to check out their site.  They have 
more than one kind.  One kind is designed for baking.  It acts more like 
regular sugar because...it's one half sucrose (regular sugar)!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 02:44:45 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> If you use Splenda, you might want to check out their site.  They have 
> more than one kind.  One kind is designed for baking.  It acts more like 
> regular sugar because...it's one half sucrose (regular sugar)!

I was aware of that stuff.
I've only ever used the packets, but thanks!

============================

From: Sharon <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:38:49 -0400
--------
Ms P wrote:
> It really helps to keep a detailed food and glucose reading diary.  If I
> don't write it down I might not remember exactly what I had for breakfast!
> LOL  That way you'll eventually be able to figure out which foods skyrocket
> your blood sugar and which foods don't.

   That's exactly right.  I have been having a bowl of Cheerios for a
while now, and I do fine with it.  A couple of weeks ago I wanted a bit
of a change, so looked at the total carb grams on a box of Honey Nut
Cheerios.  They were only two grams higher, but my sugar spiked, I'm
guessing from the honey.....Sharon

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 07:45:09 -0500
--------
Sharon wrote:
>    That's exactly right.  I have been having a bowl of Cheerios for a
> while now, and I do fine with it.  A couple of weeks ago I wanted a bit
> of a change, so looked at the total carb grams on a box of Honey Nut
> Cheerios.  They were only two grams higher, but my sugar spiked, I'm
> guessing from the honey.....Sharon

IIRC, Honey is pretty much pure sugars?

============================

From: biig <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 10:25:35 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> IIRC, Honey is pretty much pure sugars?

   I think so.  ....Sharon

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 11:04:27 -0700
--------
Sharon wrote:
>    That's exactly right.  I have been having a bowl of Cheerios for a
> while now, and I do fine with it.  A couple of weeks ago I wanted a bit
> of a change, so looked at the total carb grams on a box of Honey Nut
> Cheerios.  They were only two grams higher, but my sugar spiked, I'm
> guessing from the honey.....Sharon

Why would you think that there was honey or nuts in them?  And my quick 
web search shows 7 more grams of carbs.  Furthmore, sugar is 9g versus 
1g.  Sugar is the second ingredient, honey is the fifth, right before 
brown sugar syrup and salt.  There are no nuts, just natural almond 
flavor.

<a href="http://www.generalmills.com/corporate/brands/brand.aspx?catID=53&groupID=19412">http://www.generalmills.com/corporate/brands/brand.aspx?catID=53&groupID=19412</a>

Take a look for yourself, if you dare!

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 19:35:58 -0400
--------
Ms P wrote:
> I am doing myself a big favor by eating instant mashed.  They don't 
> skyrocket my blood sugar and make it stay high for 2 to 3 days like fresh 
> potatoes do.  If I'm going to eat any potatoes at all I try and eat 
> processed ones.

Wish I had read this earlier.  I'm going for blood work on Tuesday and just 
finished a baked potato.  I'm on the high side of normal so the doc wants me 
to watch carbs. I do watch them.  They look so good on my plate. 

============================

From: Dave Bugg <davebugg2[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 16:39:12 -0700
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Wish I had read this earlier.  I'm going for blood work on Tuesday and just 
> finished a baked potato.  I'm on the high side of normal so the doc wants me 
> to watch carbs. I do watch them.  They look so good on my plate. 

Time for oatmeal, Edwin.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:13:11 -0400
--------
Dave Bugg wrote:
>Time for oatmeal, Edwin.

And cinnamon.  It will do wonders for your blood sugar.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 07:39:53 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And cinnamon.  It will do wonders for your blood sugar.

Oat Bran...

It's really good as a hot cereal!

I promise!

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:44:47 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And cinnamon.  It will do wonders for your blood sugar.

My mother's told me that, Christine!  Do you know if stores sell cinnamon
capsules?

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:50:49 -0400
--------
kilikini wrote
> My mother's told me that, Christine!  Do you know if stores sell cinnamon
> capsules?

Yes, they do, and it's safer than using large quantities of cinnamon.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:03:42 -0400
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Yes, they do, and it's safer than using large quantities of cinnamon.

Thanks, Nancy!  That will be next on my ever-growing supplement list.  Sigh.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:22:11 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Thanks, Nancy!  That will be next on my ever-growing supplement list.  Sigh.

Kili, if you can get empty gel caps, you can probably make your own for 
less. :-) Capsule loaders are not expensive. If you are taking a lot of 
herbals, this might save you $$$.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:28:20 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Kili, if you can get empty gel caps, you can probably make your own
> for less. :-) Capsule loaders are not expensive. If you are taking a
> lot of herbals, this might save you $$$.

I didn't know you could do that!  I'll look into it, thanks!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:32:40 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> I didn't know you could do that!  I'll look into it, thanks!

Oh yes!!! :-)

I used to load (and need to start doing it again!) Cayanne capsules.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:46:11 -0400
--------
Just a word of warning here.  

Cinnamon, no matter how innocuous it may seem, is not harmless.  I
would go with premade capsules.  If you use empty capsules and fill
them yourself, you might be getting a bigger dose of cinnamon than you
want.   

I don't know the safe dose of cinnamon, and I wouldn't want my blood
sugar to start dropping precariously.   Plus whatever other effects
that cinnamon has.

Christine, off to look up other medical effects of cinnamon

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:12:57 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Cinnamon, no matter how innocuous it may seem, is not harmless.  I
> would go with premade capsules.  If you use empty capsules and fill
> them yourself, you might be getting a bigger dose of cinnamon than you
> want.

Someone I know that works in a hospital told me they had treated a kid for 
cinnamon poisoning!  Apparently in large enough doses it's quite toxic.

I haven't tried it yet but I think I will try the premade capsules.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:14:50 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> I don't know the safe dose of cinnamon, and I wouldn't want my blood
> sugar to start dropping precariously.   Plus whatever other effects
> that cinnamon has.

Get a gram scale.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 14:39:25 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Get a gram scale.

That still doesn't address my concerns.  Cinnamon has been used
medicinally for hundreds of years.  I just want to know the safe dose,
something that is drilled into me, in my years of being an RN.   To
not do that, is taking risks that I don't think I need to take.  

From what I have been reading, high doses can be very unsafe.  

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:43:21 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> That still doesn't address my concerns.  Cinnamon has been used
> medicinally for hundreds of years.  I just want to know the safe dose,
> something that is drilled into me, in my years of being an RN.   To
> not do that, is taking risks that I don't think I need to take.  

Don't exceed the recommended dosage on one of the containers.
If you make your own based on a commercial product, why would that not 
be considered safe?

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 14:59:06 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Don't exceed the recommended dosage on one of the containers.
>If you make your own based on a commercial product, why would that not 
>be considered safe?

I personally want to know what the medical literature has to say about
the safe dose, rather than what the commercial product has to say. And
that includes knowing about possible side effects, contraindications,
etc, especially if some of them are dose related.

I am finding out that there are various studies out there, with all
sorts of different results.  

Just my medical training, I guess.  

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 14:02:32 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> I am finding out that there are various studies out there, with all
> sorts of different results.  

That is what google is for. :-)

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 16:30:19 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney says...
> That still doesn't address my concerns.  Cinnamon has been used
> medicinally for hundreds of years.  I just want to know the safe dose,
> something that is drilled into me, in my years of being an RN.   To
> not do that, is taking risks that I don't think I need to take.  

Keep increasing the dose until you die, then cut it back.

Just kidding - but I really doubt that anyone has ever done dose safety 
studies with cinnamon.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 19:01:34 -0400
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
>Just kidding - but I really doubt that anyone has ever done dose safety 
>studies with cinnamon.

Well, there have been some studies done, at least from what little
reading I did today.  I am trying to find info on the dosage, and
there might be some out there....

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 07:57:40 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> My mother's told me that, Christine!  Do you know if stores sell cinnamon
> capsules?

They do. I have some.
I got them at Sun Harvest IIRC.

I know I'm not Christine, sorry. ;-)

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:04:15 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> They do. I have some.
> I got them at Sun Harvest IIRC.
>
> I know I'm not Christine, sorry. ;-)

That's fine, sweetie.  :~)   Have you found that they've helped you?

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:25:15 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> That's fine, sweetie.  :~)   Have you found that they've helped you?

I've not experimented enough to say, but my fasting glucose has dropped 
from 92 to 87. Not a big drop but I was  happy to see it drop below 90.

My HA1C (Hemoglobin A1C) has always been in normal range.

I've been trying to resist becoming a type II diabetic and so far, so 
good. My Dr. warned me I was headed in that direction!

I know that they seem to to be soothing to my stomach. 

BTW, thanks for the Milk Thistle thing. I finally did add it to my 
daily's and it has dropped my AST and ALT levels (liver enzymes) 
into medium normal range. Granted, I've cut daily drinking but it 
still has made a difference.

Herbals are cool. :-)

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 10:45:05 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It's dropped my AST and ALT levels (liver enzymes) into medium normal
> range. Granted, I've cut daily drinking but it still has made a
> difference.

Hey- butting in here- I recently saw my GYN for a check up- I was
bitching about the horrible cramps I get for almost 2 weeks a month,
and asking about a prescription for something stronger than Tylenol or
ibuprofin. She recommended Vitamin B complex and Evening Primrose Oil.
WOW- total relief! I never would have thought that they would work so
well.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:59:51 -0400
--------
merryb wrote:
> Hey- butting in here- I recently saw my GYN for a check up- I was
> bitching about the horrible cramps I get for almost 2 weeks a month,
> and asking about a prescription for something stronger than Tylenol or
> ibuprofin. She recommended Vitamin B complex and Evening Primrose Oil.
> WOW- total relief! I never would have thought that they would work so
> well.

I believe it's the B6 that does the trick, but if the complex works for you,
go for it!  I take B6, too.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 13:14:11 -0500
--------
merryb wrote:
> Hey- butting in here- I recently saw my GYN for a check up- I was
> bitching about the horrible cramps I get for almost 2 weeks a month,
> and asking about a prescription for something stronger than Tylenol or
> ibuprofin. She recommended Vitamin B complex and Evening Primrose Oil.
> WOW- total relief! I never would have thought that they would work so
> well.

I'm glad it worked for you. :-)

Evening Primrose oil is a natural anti-inflammatory.
One of the docs I consult with recommended it for my dad's knee problems 
that Ibuprofen was not working for. He studies herbal and nutritional 
medicine on the side. He's one of our Emergency Room MD's (in fact, he's 
the head of the ER staff right now).

It worked. :-)

============================

From: Ophelia <Ophelia[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 12:51:32 +0100
--------
merryb wrote:
> Hey- butting in here- I recently saw my GYN for a check up- I was
> bitching about the horrible cramps I get for almost 2 weeks a month,
> and asking about a prescription for something stronger than Tylenol or
> ibuprofin. She recommended Vitamin B complex and Evening Primrose Oil.
> WOW- total relief! I never would have thought that they would work so
> well.

Excellent!  When I started doing low-carb, I got awful cramps in my legs.  A 
poster on that group recommended Vit B and voila!  Cramps disappeared!!  If 
I forget to take it the cramps come back. 

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 08:55:39 -0400
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Excellent!  When I started doing low-carb, I got awful cramps in my
> legs.  A poster on that group recommended Vit B and voila!  Cramps
> disappeared!!  If I forget to take it the cramps come back.

Potassium helps, too!

============================

From: Ophelia <Ophelia[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 14:31:51 +0100
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Potassium helps, too!

Thanks kili :) I will remember that if the VitB stops working ! 

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 10:27:31 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> BTW, thanks for the Milk Thistle thing. I finally did add it to my 
> daily's and it has dropped my AST and ALT levels (liver enzymes) 
> into medium normal range. Granted, I've cut daily drinking but it 
> still has made a difference.

Yay!  It's like a little miracle in a capsule, isn't it?

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:56:00 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Yay!  It's like a little miracle in a capsule, isn't it?

Indeed... :-)

Danke Muchos!

============================

From: Sharon <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 10:23:57 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And cinnamon.  It will do wonders for your blood sugar.

  I heard that too, but I've been taking a capsule of cinnamon every day
for a couple of months and don't see a difference.  ....Sharon

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 10:28:17 -0400
--------
Sharon wrote:
>   I heard that too, but I've been taking a capsule of cinnamon every
> day for a couple of months and don't see a difference.  ....Sharon

I think it takes about 3 months for it to make a difference, from what I've
heard.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:57:52 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> I think it takes about 3 months for it to make a difference, from what I've
> heard.

90 days is pretty much the standard for most herbal supplements. :-)
Nature takes longer but is generally kinder and longer lasting!

Approach that with caution tho' as not all herbals are safe.
Research research research!

============================

From: BOB <abcd[at]defg.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 19:02:11 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And cinnamon.  It will do wonders for your blood sugar.

Heh heh.  Not the way that I eat cinnamon.  On cinnamon buns.  With pleanty 
of sugary icing.  ;-)
It'll do "wonders", but not the positive way that you meant.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:52:38 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Wish I had read this earlier.  I'm going for blood work on Tuesday and just 
> finished a baked potato.  I'm on the high side of normal so the doc wants me 
> to watch carbs. I do watch them.  They look so good on my plate. 

ROFLMAO!!!

I think many of us can relate! ;-D

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 21:02:09 -0700
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Wish I had read this earlier.  I'm going for blood work on Tuesday and just 
> finished a baked potato.  I'm on the high side of normal so the doc wants me 
> to watch carbs. I do watch them.  They look so good on my plate. 

Some diabetics are more sensitive to potatoes than others.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 19:31:40 GMT
--------
Ms P <ms_peacock@wbsnet.org>wrote:
>Mmm, no, they're not.  The instant spuds I have have Idaho potatoes, Mono 
>and Diglycerides (to improve flavor) Fresheness protected by sodium 
>bisulfite and BHT.  Not a speck of fat in them, trans or otherwise.  As 
>prepared one serving (1/3 of a cup) contains 8g total fat,460g sodium, 370mg 
>potassium, 19g total carbohydrates, and 3g protein.  One serving as boxed 
>has 80 calories, as prepared 160.  It also says the sodium content without 
>added salt per serving is 120mg.

what brand do you use?  how about you, sharon?

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:56:10 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> what brand do you use?  how about you, sharon?

I think I've tried about every brand and the one I almost always go back to 
is Betty Crocker Potato Buds.

============================

From: Sharon <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:55:05 -0400
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> what brand do you use?  how about you, sharon?

   Betty Crocker....I don't use them every day or even every week.  I
can have a 1/2 cup with no problem.  
   We also like new potatoes done in the microwave (our choice..)  I
choose a small one for myself and it doesn't cause me any problems.
Yesterday I did new potatoes, sliced part way through, with onion
slices, butter and lemon peper in the slices.  I do bakers (russets) on
the gas grill, wrapped in foil.  We don't like the skin crispy.  To each
his own.......Sharon

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 16:59:11 GMT
--------
Sharon wrote:
>   Betty Crocker....I don't use them every day or even every week.  I
>can have a 1/2 cup with no problem.  

thanks, sharon and ms. p.  i was thinking they might be nice to have
on hand, waiting docilely in the cupboard instead of sprouting and
turning bad.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 12:26:08 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> thanks, sharon and ms. p.  i was thinking they might be nice to have
> on hand, waiting docilely in the cupboard instead of sprouting and
> turning bad.

If you are going to store them for any length of time, would not hurt to 
vacuum pack them. Like any dried product, weevils love them. ;-)

Mom always stored them in lightning jars. The seal helps.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 16:05:36 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
>If you are going to store them for any length of time, would not hurt to 
>vacuum pack them. Like any dried product, weevils love them. ;-)

i've not had any weevil problems in my current apartment, but had them
once elsewhere.  noted.  do you refrigerate?

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 11:20:26 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> i've not had any weevil problems in my current apartment, but had them
> once elsewhere.  noted.  do you refrigerate?

Now that I have the Hobart unit, yes.
I now have the space for refrigerating jarred dry goods!

I did, however, recently clean out the main spice cabinet next to the 
stove. There were a few small boxed items that were full of holes and 
weevil exoskeletons in the very back, as well as some old packages of 
powdered salad dressings in paper envelopes in the same condition. 
Everything in metal (except for one can of Hungarian paprika) and in 
sealed glass was ok. The can of Paprika was full of dead weevils, weevil 
poop and exoskeletons.

Needless to say, it got tossed. ;-)

The whole cabinet got emptied and thoroughly cleaned. It has been "a 
while".

Most of the ruined stuff was stuff that dad had brought with him when he 
moved in with me 5 years ago. Gods knows how old it was even then.

It's a narrow kitchen cabinet with 3 shelves.

The problem is is that he brought a lot of mixes that I just don't 
prefer to use. There were at least 6 jars of "Masala" mixes in good 
condition. Good smell and flavor. 

I freecycled quite a bit of stuff, including those!

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:48:00 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Nothing the matter with instant, the major name brands are made from
> better and fresher spuds than you can buy at the market.....

Yeah, right.....

"Betty Crocker Homestyle Creamy Butter Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients:
Idaho Potatoes (Idaho is a registered trademark of the Idaho Potato
Commission), Salt, Maltodextrin, Dried corn Syrup, Margarine
(Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Nonfat Milk, Lecithin, Mono
and Diglycerides, Annatto Extract [Color], Natural Flavor), Whey,
Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Natural and Artificial Butter
flavor, Butter, Cream of Tartar, Baking Soda, Nonfat Milk, Distilled
Monoglycerides, Buttermilk, Sodium Caseinate, Dried Cream, Wheat
Flour, Mono and Diglycerides, Preserved with Sodium Acid
Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bisulfite and Citric Acid, Ascorbic Acid, Sugar,
Propylene Glycol, Monoesters of Fatty Acids, Guar Gum, Sodium Stearoyl
Lactylate, Lactose Silicon Dioxide (Anticaking Agent), Sour Cream
(Cultured Cream, Nonfat Milk), Modified Corn Starch, sodium Phosphate,
Lactic Acid, Sodium Silicoaluminate (Anticaking Agent), Enzymes,
Artificial Color, Soy Lecithin, Soy Flour."

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EMQEN6/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Betty-Crocker-Homestyle-Potatoes-3-6-Ounce/dp/B000EMQEN6/</a>

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:39:31 -0500
--------
notbob wrote:
> Yeah, right.....
> 
> "Betty Crocker Homestyle Creamy Butter Mashed Potatoes
> 
> Ingredients:

Depends on the Brand. :-)
When we bought them for camping, we always bought Idahoan.
Still has some preservatives but:

Idaho potatoes, mono and diglycerides, sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium 
bisulfite, citric acid and mixed tocopherol.

<a href="http://simplotfoods.com/index.cfm?content=products&class_id=353">http://simplotfoods.com/index.cfm?content=products&class_id=353</a>

The trick is to learn to read labels, and not get the flavored crap.
When I did use potato flakes, I preferred to add my own butter, cream 
and shredded cheddar jack cheese, along with a smidge of garlic powder.

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:44:48 -0500
--------
notbob wrote:
> Yeah, right.....
>
> "Betty Crocker Homestyle Creamy Butter Mashed Potatoes
>
> Ingredients:

Those aren't ordinary instant mashed either.  They already have the milk and 
butter added.  Check the labels of the kinds you have to add the butter, 
milk and salt to.

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:06:39 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:
> Those aren't ordinary instant.....

What the Hell is "ordinary instant"?  There's nothing even remotely ordinary
about instant potatoes.  

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:45:10 -0700
--------
notbob wrote:
>What the Hell is "ordinary instant"?  There's nothing even remotely ordinary
>about instant potatoes.  

Unflavored.... "original", whatever.  I understood.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:27:09 -0700
--------
notbob wrote:
> Yeah, right.....
>
> "Betty Crocker Homestyle Creamy Butter Mashed Potatoes
>
> Ingredients:

Very funny... that's dehy potatoes like condensed cream-of soup is
water.

You need to grow a spine so you can play fair.
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EDBPY8/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Potatoes-20-Ounce/dp/B000EDBPY8</a>

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:21:52 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Very funny... that's dehy potatoes like condensed cream-of soup is
> water.
>
> You need to grow a spine so you can play fair.
> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EDBPY8/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Potatoes-20-Ounce/dp/B000EDBPY8</a>

If they actually are dehydrated, why do they require refrigeration?
So, don't you go growing a spine.  It would deprive your ass of it's
favorite occupant.

"Label Information
Ingredients
Dried Idaho Russet Potatoes, Mono and Diglycerides from Vegetable Oil
(to Improve Texture), Citric Acid.

Directions
Keeps best refrigerated or frozen....."

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 13:03:49 -0500
--------
notbob wrote:
> If they actually are dehydrated, why do they require refrigeration?
> So, don't you go growing a spine.  It would deprive your ass of it's
> favorite occupant.
> 
> "Label Information
> Ingredients
> Dried Idaho Russet Potatoes, Mono and Diglycerides from Vegetable Oil
> (to Improve Texture), Citric Acid.
> 
> Directions
> Keeps best refrigerated or frozen....."

In all fairness, I have to rate that reply at least a 7. ;-)

Made me laugh!

We are playing a game here, right?

nb, you ignored my reply with the Idahoan ingredients that don't require 
refrigeration! That was not playing fair.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:35:45 -0700
--------
notbob wrote:
> Keeps best refrigerated or frozen....."

You delusional illiterate douchebag... it doesn't say "require".  They
only *suggest* refrigeration, because it's a large amount and
refrigeration (or freezing) is how to extend the shelf life of foods

But more importantly, notice the long list of ingredients contained in
plain dehys... not the BS you attempted to pawn off until yyou got
caught... you useless smarmy motherfucker.... but you're a "bob, and
that means filthy lying WOP.. I've never yet met a bob that was a man.

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:07:30 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> that means filthy lying WOP.. I've never yet met a bob that was a man.

Considering that filthy mouth and the fact you're still breathing, my
guess is you've never met a man.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 13:54:19 -0700
--------
notbob wrote:
> Considering that filthy mouth and the fact you're still breathing, my
> guess is you've never met a man.

You guess wrong.  I''ve met plenty of men, just not any guinea WOPS
named bob... but then you're notbob... so who knows what you are, but
whatever you are I do know that you're a dumb pile of highly offensive
shit.  Anyway notbob is a lie, because you definitely are a bob... you
need to change your name to WOPBOB, but NOTAMAN is more becoming.

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 16:19:48 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> You guess wrong.  I''ve met plenty of men, just not any guinea WOPS
> named bob... but then you're notbob... so who knows what you are, but
> whatever you are I do know that you're a dumb pile of highly offensive
> shit.  Anyway notbob is a lie, because you definitely are a bob... you
> need to change your name to WOPBOB, but NOTAMAN is more becoming.

Let's see, racism, potty mouth, scat fetish... yep, it's all there.
No doubt who you are.  

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:39:30 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Very funny... that's dehy potatoes like condensed cream-of soup is
> water.
> 
> You need to grow a spine so you can play fair.
> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EDBPY8/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Potatoes-20-Ounce/dp/B000EDBPY8</a>

Damn. That's even better than my submission of Idahoans. :-)

Well done Shel'!

Fair play using Google!
What a concept. <G>

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:59:25 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> You need to grow a spine so you can play fair.
> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EDBPY8/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Potatoes-20-Ounce/dp/B000EDBPY8</a>

Those look pretty good.  I'll have to order a case.  Thanks!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 07:19:51 -0500
--------
Steve Y wrote:
>   This lead me to considering what 
> is the worst thing that you can do to a real potato.

Slicing it into strips and deep frying it?
As in French fries? <G>

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" <dog3[at]foodiecharter.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 12:43:46 GMT
--------
Steve Y dropped this turd:
>   This lead me to considering
> what is the worst thing that you can do to a real potato.

Dehydrate the potato for instant mashed potatoes. UGH... I really don't 
like 'em except maybe to use as a thickening agent.  

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:44:33 -0500
--------
Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan wrote:
> Dehydrate the potato for instant mashed potatoes. UGH... I really don't 
> like 'em except maybe to use as a thickening agent.  

They are good for camping... :-)

But we generally just stuck whole small spuds wrapped in foil into the 
campfire coals.

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 09:16:50 -0400
--------
Steve Y wrote
> Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

I know not everyone feels this way, but what comes to mind
is Tater Tots.

============================

From: Giusi <decobabe[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:19:17 +0200
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I know not everyone feels this way, but what comes to mind
> is Tater Tots.

I do like those.  Haven't seen one in years.

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 09:34:09 -0400
--------
Giusi wrote:
> I do like those.  Haven't seen one in years.

Tee hee ... I know, otherwise perfectly normal people with
seeming good taste have this aberration.  Liking Tater Tots.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 09:20:53 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Tee hee ... I know, otherwise perfectly normal people with
> seeming good taste have this aberration.  Liking Tater Tots.

Hey!  I love them!  It's a childhood thing, like some people with grilled
cheese sandwiches and Campbell's tomato soup.  But I don't have any in my
freezer at the moment, nor fish sticks, either :P

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:55:49 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Hey!  I love them!  It's a childhood thing, like some people with grilled
> cheese sandwiches and Campbell's tomato soup.  But I don't have any in my
> freezer at the moment, nor fish sticks, either :P

Jill, have you found a good fish stick? I haven't! Do you bake or deep 
fry them?

Best fish sticks I have had were ones I made myself a couple of times. 
Salmon fillet cut into 1/2" thick strips, dredged lightly in spiced corn 
starch and deep fried for 3 minutes.

Dad liked them too. :-) And he's pickier than I am.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 10:23:33 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Jill, have you found a good fish stick? I haven't! Do you bake or deep
> fry them?

Baked.  I don't deep fry stuff; not that I'm worried about fat or calories,
I simply haven't owned a deep fryer in years.

Oddly enough the best fish sticks are the cheap ones.  I think Fisher Boy is
the brand; they are breaded, not battered, and made from Atlantic cod.  I
haven't bought any in a long time.  But I was sadly disappointed by the more
expensive brands, like Gorton's and Mrs. Paul's.

> Best fish sticks I have had were ones I made myself a couple of times.
> Salmon fillet cut into 1/2" thick strips, dredged lightly in spiced
> corn starch and deep fried for 3 minutes.

I'm still not a fan of salmon fillets.  I don't know what it is about them,
I am just not impressed.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:34:12 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:

> Oddly enough the best fish sticks are the cheap ones.  I think Fisher Boy is
> the brand; they are breaded, not battered, and made from Atlantic cod.  I
> haven't bought any in a long time.  But I was sadly disappointed by the more
> expensive brands, like Gorton's and Mrs. Paul's.

Huh. That might be my problem. I've only ever tried the pricier ones.

> I'm still not a fan of salmon fillets.  I don't know what it is about them,
> I am just not impressed.

I was not much of a salmon fan either until I started trying the farm 
raised. The wild has a sharp metallic flavor that just does not appeal.

Catfish "nuggets" treated the same as above are even better tho', just 
more work to prepare. Same for chicken breast tenders.

I get a crispier coating using corn starch instead of corn meal or wheat 
flour. Sometimes I mix it with rice flour if I have any on hand.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:52:11 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Jill, have you found a good fish stick? I haven't! Do you bake or deep 
>fry them?

Have you ever tried Gorton's?  That's the only brand I like.  I baked
them.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 02:07:54 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> Have you ever tried Gorton's?  That's the only brand I like.  I baked
> them.

No I haven't.
Thanks for the recommend!

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2007 00:59:52 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> Have you ever tried Gorton's?  That's the only brand I like.  I baked
> them.

Gorton's runs a close second to the less expensive Fisher Boy.  I don't know
why but I liked their battered fish portions, although the phrase "fish
portions" really bothers me.  LOL  And yes, baked.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2007 07:48:27 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Gorton's runs a close second to the less expensive Fisher Boy.  I don't know
>why but I liked their battered fish portions, although the phrase "fish
>portions" really bothers me.  LOL  And yes, baked.

We don't get Fisher Boy out here.  Oh, well.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 11:02:09 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Hey!  I love them!  It's a childhood thing, like some people with grilled
>cheese sandwiches and Campbell's tomato soup.  But I don't have any in my
>freezer at the moment, nor fish sticks, either :P

For me, it's tater tots and chicken nuggets.  

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:12:33 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> For me, it's tater tots and chicken nuggets.

I'll go with grilled cheese sammich and hot chicken noodle soup.
Memories from Joyce, our baby sitter. :-)

============================

From: smitty456[at]webtv.net (J S)
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 12:32:01 -0400
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Hey!  I love them!  It's a childhood thing, like some people with grilled
>cheese sandwiches and Campbell's tomato soup.  But I don't have any in my
>freezer at the moment, nor fish sticks, either :P

Grew up on Tater Tots,like Latkes only round.I still occasionally use
them.I mash them up,add an egg and use them as quickie home fries....

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:50:15 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Tee hee ... I know, otherwise perfectly normal people with
> seeming good taste have this aberration.  Liking Tater Tots.

They sell them at work sometimes too, along with another interesting 
bite sized item, mini-corn fritters. Kinda like a hush puppy, only 
sweeter and containing some whole and creamed corn.

Those damned things are addicting! (The corn thingies) I've only allowed 
myself to have the two or three times in the last 4 or 5 years. ;-d

Fortunately, now that I work night shift, the dining facility is closed 
and only opens right when I leave in the morning so they are never 
available.

They do make some mean breakfast tacos tho'.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:45:46 -0500
--------
Giusi wrote:
> I do like those.  Haven't seen one in years.

They come frozen in bags at the grocery store in the frozen veggies 
section. They are also sold at some fast food places like Sonic.

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 19:43:30 -0500
--------
Giusi wrote:
> I do like those.  Haven't seen one in years.

They sell Tater Tots at some of the hamburger places here in the south.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 04:51:18 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> They sell Tater Tots at some of the hamburger places here in the
> south.

If you're calling 'Sonic' a hamburger place I'm going to have to come over
there and slap you silly! ;)

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:14:33 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> If you're calling 'Sonic' a hamburger place I'm going to have to come over
> there and slap you silly! ;)

Ummm... OK I won't mention it.  LOL  Speaking of Sonic, have you noticed 
some of the slushes they advertise as you drive by? 
Watermelon-Cranberry-Route44.  One of these days I will have to stop and 
check them out.  I never go to Sonic, I usually stop at local places.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:51:22 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Ummm... OK I won't mention it.  LOL  Speaking of Sonic, have you noticed 
> some of the slushes they advertise as you drive by? 
> Watermelon-Cranberry-Route44.  One of these days I will have to stop and 
> check them out.  I never go to Sonic, I usually stop at local places.

There are two Sonics in my town. Mom loved their lemon slushes.
I've not stopped by once since she passed...

But, I don't eat a lot of fast food as a general rule anyway.
Churches fried chicken is probably my one downfall. ;-)

That and Der Wienershnitzel (or however the hell it's spelled!) polish 
sausage sandwiches on rye with mustard, kraut, swiss cheese and pickle!
It's been about 6 months since I've had one of those.

Fried chicken is the most common sin.

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:07:22 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> But, I don't eat a lot of fast food as a general rule anyway.
> Churches fried chicken is probably my one downfall. ;-)

Fried chicken rules!  It looks like we have a common vice.  Isn't that 
special? lol  Where I live, I can buy fried chicken almost as cheap as I 
can make it.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:56:59 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Fried chicken rules!  It looks like we have a common vice.  Isn't that 
> special? lol  Where I live, I can buy fried chicken almost as cheap as I 
> can make it.

I can too. Church's always has dark meat specials...

============================

From: BOBOBOnoBO® <CLASSACT[at]BRICK.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 17:04:45 -0700
--------
Becca wrote:
> Ummm... OK I won't mention it.  LOL  Speaking of Sonic, have you noticed
> some of the slushes they advertise as you drive by?
> Watermelon-Cranberry-Route44.  One of these days I will have to stop and
> check them out.  I never go to Sonic, I usually stop at local places.

They didn't used to have Sonics in the city, at least in Missouri.
They were in bohunk little towns.  Then they realized that city folks
can have bad taste too.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 20:43:52 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Ummm... OK I won't mention it.  LOL  Speaking of Sonic, have you noticed 
> some of the slushes they advertise as you drive by? 
> Watermelon-Cranberry-Route44.  One of these days I will have to stop and 
> check them out.  I never go to Sonic, I usually stop at local places.

I've seen the ads on TV.  I have eaten at a Sonic exactly once.  We were on
the road and there was nothing else around.  Can't say I'd write home about
it.  Didn't have a slushy thing; got a cup of ice water.  I think John had a
Coke or maybe a Pepsi (dunno).

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:06:31 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> I've seen the ads on TV.  I have eaten at a Sonic exactly once.  We
> were on the road and there was nothing else around.  Can't say I'd
> write home about it.  Didn't have a slushy thing; got a cup of ice
> water.  I think John had a Coke or maybe a Pepsi (dunno).

There are a couple of positive things I can say about Sonic. They make 
their own onion rings and they have Diet Sprite and Minute Maid Light. 
Most restaurants have Diet Coke or Diet Pepsi, but Sonic is the only 
fast food restaurant, I am aware of, that offers Diet Sprite.

============================

From: Tara <jarvis57[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 16:29:34 GMT
--------
Becca wrote:
>There are a couple of positive things I can say about Sonic. They make 
>their own onion rings and they have Diet Sprite and Minute Maid Light. 
>Most restaurants have Diet Coke or Diet Pepsi, but Sonic is the only 
>fast food restaurant, I am aware of, that offers Diet Sprite.

My favorite Sonic drink is the diet cherry limeade with that wonderful
chewy ice.  After I drink the limeade, I squeeze the limes over the
ice and munch the ice.  I'm not sure what the correct term is for
their type of ice -- they have the little pellets of ice that seem to
be formed of compressed ice shavings.  

I should say that is my favorite diet drink.  I also love Sonic
chocolate malts with lots of extra malt.

I like Sonic BLT's on thick Texas toast.  I occasionally crave their
chili dogs with mustard and onions.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 11:44:28 -0500
--------
Tara wrote:
> My favorite Sonic drink is the diet cherry limeade with that wonderful
> chewy ice.  After I drink the limeade, I squeeze the limes over the
> ice and munch the ice.  I'm not sure what the correct term is for
> their type of ice -- they have the little pellets of ice that seem to
> be formed of compressed ice shavings.  

My mom always loved their fresh lime-ades...

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 11:55:18 -0500
--------
Tara wrote:
> My favorite Sonic drink is the diet cherry limeade with that wonderful
> chewy ice.  After I drink the limeade, I squeeze the limes over the
> ice and munch the ice.  

I'm sorry.  Does not compute!  

> be formed of compressed ice shavings.  

....or recycled plastic supermarket bags.  You've got me intrigued,
now.  As an incurable ice muncher, I now have to hunt down a Sonic and try
one of these darn things.  ;)

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 12:16:37 -0500
--------
Tara wrote:
> My favorite Sonic drink is the diet cherry limeade with that wonderful
> chewy ice.  After I drink the limeade, I squeeze the limes over the
> ice and munch the ice.  

I will second her that it's good...
and the texture is delightful!

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 16:39:03 -0500
--------
Tara wrote:
> My favorite Sonic drink is the diet cherry limeade with that
> wonderful chewy ice.  After I drink the limeade, I squeeze the limes
> over the ice and munch the ice.  I'm not sure what the correct term
> is for their type of ice -- they have the little pellets of ice that
> seem to be formed of compressed ice shavings.

They sell bags of ice at Sonic, one of my friends buys it. Their ice 
must be popular.

My friend Linda had breast cancer, and her favorite treat was a Cherry 
Limeade from Sonic.  When she was feeling ill, I would pick one up for 
her. I will have to try one some day.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2007 01:21:15 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Ummm... OK I won't mention it.  LOL  Speaking of Sonic, have you noticed 
> some of the slushes they advertise as you drive by? 
> Watermelon-Cranberry-Route44.  One of these days I will have to stop and 
> check them out.  I never go to Sonic, I usually stop at local places.

There are only two "local" hamburger places around here.  Dyer's has been
discussed over the last 10 years.  You really would fall in love with a deep
fried hamburger.  I know it sounds nuts, but there is a method to the
madness.  (They also do split deep fried beef hot dogs served on a hamburger
bun.)  And they serve tater tots, or at least they did at the unofficial
branch where I worked (which was also an ice cream parlor).  100-something
year old grease and got a police escort when they moved to Downtown... don't
ask :)  Strained daily but they claim some of that original grease must
still be in there!

And Huey's.  They started out in midtown Memphis.  Looks like they have
expanded to Southhaven, MS.  Still not what I'd consider a "chain" (yet).
They have nice big juicy burgers; I dare say almost the juiciest hamburgers
you ever tasted (aside from your own grill, that is).  And the fries are
pretty darn good, too!

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2007 15:15:04 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> And Huey's.  They started out in midtown Memphis.  Looks like they
> have expanded to Southhaven, MS.  Still not what I'd consider a
> "chain" (yet). They have nice big juicy burgers; I dare say almost
> the juiciest hamburgers you ever tasted (aside from your own grill,
> that is).  And the fries are pretty darn good, too!

Huey's may not be a major chain, but they are located in Tennessee and 
Mississippi, so that is a start.  Louisiana is not that far, so I hope 
they open a location near me.

Whataburger is a local chain and all of their locations are in the 
South/Southwest (Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Florida, New Mexico, 
Arizona, Georgia, Alabama) and they make my favorite hamburger. For a 
chain restaurant, their food is pretty good. People from some areas of 
the country may be puzzled, because they put mustard on their burgers, 
unless you request something different.

============================

From: Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth[at]die_spammer.biz>
Date: 14 Jun 2007 02:24:02 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> If you're calling 'Sonic' a hamburger place I'm going to have to come over
> there and slap you silly! ;)

I don't get it. Why is Sonic not a hamburger place?

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2007 15:20:53 -0500
--------
Bob Terwilliger wrote:
> I don't get it. Why is Sonic not a hamburger place?

I was joking, hence the ;)  Sure, they sell hamburgers.  They also sell
everything else under the sun including chicken sandwiches, chili-dogs and
who knows what else.  But I'd equate their food with that of McDonalds.

============================

From: kuvasz guy <fpc123[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 07:51:04 -0700
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I know not everyone feels this way, but what comes to mind
> is Tater Tots.

You got that one right!  Needless to say, the serving of garlic
whipped mashed potatoes should be a misdemeanor...

..fred

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 11:14:11 -0400
--------
kuvasz guy wrote
> You got that one right!  Needless to say, the serving of garlic
> whipped mashed potatoes should be a misdemeanor...

That's right!  Never whip potatoes, it's just wrong!

By the way, I didn't say it, but I am jealous of your plan to go to
the garlic festival.  Being there are eight home games (football)
this year, I wonder if I'll get to go anywhere at all this fall.

============================

From: kuvasz guy <fpc123[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 16:57:48 -0700
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> That's right!  Never whip potatoes, it's just wrong!
>
> By the way, I didn't say it, but I am jealous of your plan to go to
> the garlic festival.  Being there are eight home games (football)
> this year, I wonder if I'll get to go anywhere at all this fall.

lol...  ya got me...  I think I recall a distant memory that you
follow the jersey jets; given my history as a long suffering vikings
fan and the fact I've never seen a pro game in person, I think you're
coming out ahead...

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:56:20 -0700
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>I know not everyone feels this way, but what comes to mind
>is Tater Tots.

Put me in the "I love Tater Tots" camp.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:57:39 GMT
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

Pretty much anything in the freezer section labeled "Potato" is going to be 
nasty. 

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:52:12 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

> Pretty much anything in the freezer section labeled "Potato" is going to be 
> nasty. 

Disagree. I bought a fresh frozen veggie mix a couple of weeks ago that 
had small red spuds in it and steamed the whole package.

They were quite good!

============================

From: smitty456[at]webtv.net (J S)
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 12:42:06 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote: 
> Disagree. I bought a fresh frozen veggie mix a couple of weeks ago that 
> had small red spuds in it and steamed the whole package.
>
> They were quite good!

Agree with Om. Ore-Ida has some of the best steak fries Ive bought
frozen.Their crinkle fries are good also ,cook up evenly.I get mine at
Publix or Albertsons and stock up during their sales.Made many a good
caserole with them also .....Cheers,Smitty 

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:43:20 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Pretty much anything in the freezer section labeled "Potato" is going to be 
> nasty. 

Not sure why you say that.  When in high school, I worked in a potato
processing plant in Eastern Washington.  All those products go from
whole, just harvested, potatoes to finished frozen potato products in
about an hour after entering the line.  The only thing they are
processed with is lye (to help peel), water and cooking oil.  It's
hard to find a less adulterated product.  Even the oft derided potato
tot is nothing more than a ball of shredded potatoes which are
partially deep fried.  Much better than all the crap in a box of
instant.

============================

From: BOBOBOnoBO® <CLASSACT[at]BRICK.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 17:06:41 -0700
--------
notbob wrote:
> Not sure why you say that.  When in high school, I worked in a potato
> processing plant in Eastern Washington.  All those products go from
> whole, just harvested, potatoes to finished frozen potato products in
> about an hour after entering the line.  The only thing they are
> processed with is lye (to help peel), water and cooking oil.  It's
> hard to find a less adulterated product.  Even the oft derided potato
> tot is nothing more than a ball of shredded potatoes which are
> partially deep fried.  Much better than all the crap in a box of
> instant.

Horse shit is better than dog shit too.  Tater tots are "derided" for
a reason.

============================

From: notbob <notbob[at]nothome.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:01:17 -0500
--------
BOBOBOnoBO® wrote:
> Horse shit is better than dog shit too.  Tater tots are "derided" for
> a reason.

I can see how many people might feel that way.  I'm not a real tater
tot fan, or any deep fried food, for that matter.  But, the point I
was trying to make is, they are essentially nothing more than french
fries in a different form.  

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 09:06:14 -0400
--------
notbob wrote:
> I can see how many people might feel that way.  I'm not a real tater
> tot fan, or any deep fried food, for that matter.  But, the point I
> was trying to make is, they are essentially nothing more than french
> fries in a different form.

With that chemical aftertaste.

Heh, I don't get tater tots, but if people like them, fine by me.
I'm just teasing y'all.  You probably think the Nutty Bar I'm having
with my coffee is horrible.

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 11:31:23 -0400
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Pretty much anything in the freezer section labeled "Potato" is going to be 
> nasty. 

I have to disagree.  There are many good frozen potato
products.

I particularly like frozen french fries better than
those made from fresh potatoes.  I like the texture better.
You can get Ore-Ida fat crinkle cut fries which is something
you can't find in restaurants anymore.  I hate the McFries and
their clones.  I'm not fond of any sort of shoestring-style
fries or anything that is not at least 1/2 inch thick.  When
I was a kid virtually all of the fries were fat but now, due
no doubt to the influence of McDonald's skinny fries, practically
everyone sells those things now.  Also, fresh fries would be good
if they were properly cooked, i. e. twice, but most places that
serve fresh-cut fries only cook them once.  They do not get a
crisp exterior and the interior and not the proper texture, i. e.
light and fluffy.  Give me Ore-Ida crinkle cut frozen french
fries any day!

Also, Ore-Ida frozen mashed potatoes are not bad either.
Much better than instant, although I do not abhor instant -
some brands are not too awful and a ***LOT*** easier than
peeling potatoes which is something I absolutely despise
doing and probably only do a couple of times a year, one of
them being T-Day.  The main thing wrong with the frozen
mashed is that they put margarine in them but it's not
noticeable if you add lots of butter.

I also like frozen hash browns both shredded and diced.

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 14:21:08 -0700
--------
Kate Connally wrote:

> I have to disagree.  There are many good frozen potato
> products.

There's some nasty stuff there, but I find that most is just potatoes 
with minimal processing.

> I particularly like frozen french fries better than
> those made from fresh potatoes.  I like the texture better.
> You can get Ore-Ida fat crinkle cut fries which is something
> you can't find in restaurants anymore.  I hate the McFries and
> their clones.  I'm not fond of any sort of shoestring-style
> fries or anything that is not at least 1/2 inch thick.

I happen to like the skinny ones.  When you buy frozen, you get a 
choice.  When you buy them at a restaurant, you get whatever *they* 
choose.

> Also, Ore-Ida frozen mashed potatoes are not bad either.
> Much better than instant, although I do not abhor instant -
> some brands are not too awful and a ***LOT*** easier than
> peeling potatoes which is something I absolutely despise
> doing and probably only do a couple of times a year, one of
> them being T-Day.

We don't buy the instant.  I like some texture to my potatoes.  When we 
have mashed potatoes, we often leave the skin on.  Usually they are red 
potatoes with thin skins.  My wife likes those better.

> I also like frozen hash browns both shredded and diced.

I prefer shredded but will eat either.  Shredding your own is a hassle, 
and they turn brown easily.  I shred them over a bowl of water, which 
can get messy.

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 11:19:26 -0400
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> We don't buy the instant.  I like some texture to my potatoes.  When we 
> have mashed potatoes, we often leave the skin on.  Usually they are red 
> potatoes with thin skins.  My wife likes those better.

I used to do that - leave the skins on - but I prefer
russets for regular mashed potatoes (red skinned potatoes
are okay for garlic "smashed" potatoes) and nowadays it
seems the skins on russets are much thicker and tougher
than they used to be.  I always leave skins on where possible,
not only because I'm lazy and don't want to peel potatoes, but
I like the skins.  So I like them left on for home fries
and things like that.  But you can't leave russet skins on
for mashed anymore.  It's like finding little pieces of leather
in your potatoes.  I don't like *that* much texture.

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 12:30:20 -0700
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I used to do that - leave the skins on - but I prefer
> russets for regular mashed potatoes (red skinned potatoes
> are okay for garlic "smashed" potatoes) and nowadays it
> seems the skins on russets are much thicker and tougher
> than they used to be.  I always leave skins on where possible,
> not only because I'm lazy and don't want to peel potatoes, but
> I like the skins.  So I like them left on for home fries
> and things like that.  But you can't leave russet skins on
> for mashed anymore.  It's like finding little pieces of leather
> in your potatoes.  I don't like *that* much texture.

It's not just the lack of skins that makes the instant have no texture, 
it's how it is all smooth like baby food.  We like our mashed potatoes 
to have little chunks of potato in them.  Some people call them "lumpy", 
we call them "good".

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:16:51 -0500
--------
Steve Y said...
> Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud?

Put a bag of yukon gold potatoes in the drawer and forget about 
'em. When the kitchen starts to stink, REMEMBER THE YUKONS!

About the saddest potato I ever did see was a leftover one in the 
fridge. I hope I don't wrinkle up like that when I get old.

I left two russet potatoes in a hot oven all day and when I came 
home they were hollow inside, just shells of their former selves.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:53:57 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> Put a bag of yukon gold potatoes in the drawer and forget about 
> 'em. When the kitchen starts to stink, REMEMBER THE YUKONS!

<lol> Been there, done that, but with red spuds.
Damn that's a nasty smell!

Gaggy to clean it up too as they generally dissolve pretty badly.

> About the saddest potato I ever did see was a leftover one in the 
> fridge. I hope I don't wrinkle up like that when I get old.

You mean it didn't sprout?

> I left two russet potatoes in a hot oven all day and when I came 
> home they were hollow inside, just shells of their former selves.

I've seen people screw up microwave potatoes that way.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:59:31 -0500
--------
Omelet said...
> You mean it didn't sprout?

I forgot to say it was a leftover baked potato. Oops. It would've 
made a real sorry looking Mr. Potato Head.

============================

From: Giusi <decobabe[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:03:43 +0200
--------
Andy wrote:
> I forgot to say it was a leftover baked potato. Oops. It would've 
> made a real sorry looking Mr. Potato Head.

You'll either die too young or you'll get wrinkled.  Your choice.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:29:46 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> I forgot to say it was a leftover baked potato. Oops. It would've 
> made a real sorry looking Mr. Potato Head.

Oh.

============================

From: ravenlynne <ravenlynne[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:58:59 +0200
--------
Steve Y wrote:

> 1) Microwaved spuds that are called "baked"

This is a useful technique, IMO, to make hash browns but never for a 
baked potato. The outside should be rubbed with oil and kosher salt and 
wrapped in foil.

> 2) Potatoes that get cooked and then get "pureed" in mixers to remove 
> all traces of texture.

Yeah, my MIL does this.  I didn't believe that it was possible to ruin 
mashed potatoes, but apparently it is.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 09:29:50 -0700
--------
ravenlynne wrote:
> for a baked potato. The outside should be rubbed with oil and
> kosher salt and wrapped in foil.

Baked while wrapped in foil spuds may as well be nuked, in fact nuked
is better, a lot better.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 11:40:24 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Baked while wrapped in foil spuds may as well be nuked, in fact nuked
> is better, a lot better.

Ok, so how do you nuke your spuds?

Roasting them on the wood grill, foil is pretty much necessary to keep 
them from drying out. Same as in the oven.

I speed cooking by using a spike thru the middle of them. Mom taught me 
that when I was first learning to cook from her. :-)

Those really big steel nails from the hardware store work ok, but 
aluminum potato spikes work better. Goes against my usual prejudice on 
using aluminum to cook, but I will compromise sometimes and spuds are 
not acidic.

For nuking, I wrap them in wax paper and put them in a ziplock with a 
little water. IMHO there is nothing wrong with nuking potatoes if it's 
done properly.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:03:28 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:

> Ok, so how do you nuke your spuds?

Not very often.  Poke a few holes and let her rip.  But I don't delude
myself by calling them baked. .. essentially they're steamed... nuked
too long and you have dehys, if they don't ignite.  Wrapped in waxed
paper is creating a miniature pressure processor, them's burled, to
death.

> Roasting them on the wood grill, foil is pretty much necessary to keep
> them from drying out. Same as in the oven.

Nonsense.  Baked spuds are supposed to be dry...  supposta replace the
lost moisture with budder, sour cream, chicken schmaltz, whatever fat
of your choice.

Of course if you've never had a "micky" then you've never had a real
baked spud.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 12:14:17 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Not very often.  Poke a few holes and let her rip.  But I don't delude
> myself by calling them baked. .. essentially they're steamed... nuked
> too long and you have dehys, if they don't ignite.  Wrapped in waxed
> paper is creating a miniature pressure processor, them's burled, to
> death.

I think that will only work with russets tho' as they have a thicker 
skin. I don't buy russets. I use Yukon golds or red skins. They are 
thinner and I think they really do need the protection. I don't like 
Russets.

Try it. :-)

It IS the way they do it at Restaurants! I've never been served a baked 
spud without foil on the outside, and an oil/salt treatment on the skin.

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 18:34:40 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I think that will only work with russets tho' as they have a thicker 
> skin. I don't buy russets.

> It IS the way they do it at Restaurants! I've never been served a baked 
> spud without foil on the outside, and an oil/salt treatment on the skin.

That's because you've never had a real baked potato at a restaurant.  
Cooking them in foil works better for the restaurant.  They keep well 
without drying out.  Of course, then, they use russets, which you don't 
like.  I eat the ones in foil, they are good.  The ones cooked without 
foil are better, at least to my taste.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:28:50 -0700
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
>That's because you've never had a real baked potato at a restaurant.  
>Cooking them in foil works better for the restaurant.  They keep well 
>without drying out.  Of course, then, they use russets, which you don't 
>like.  I eat the ones in foil, they are good.  The ones cooked without 
>foil are better, at least to my taste.

People must not like crispy skins either.  Why else bake it in foil?
I certainly don't need oil or salt on the outside.  I prefer my salt
with some butter on the inside.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 05:02:58 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It IS the way they do it at Restaurants! I've never been served a
> baked spud without foil on the outside, and an oil/salt treatment on
> the skin.

They do that in restaurants so they won't get cold while sitting waiting for
someone to order one with dinner, not because it's the ideal way to bake a
potato.  One of the restaurants where I used to work would bake at least 100
potatoes (wrapped in foil) a night and pray everyone would order one with
dinner rather than fries or rice pilaf.

You wouldn't believe the number of baked spuds that were tossed out at
night.  We used to complain - can't you give all that food to a soup kitchen
or a homeless mission or something?  Apparently it was (is?) against health
department regulations.  Such a waste.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:08:40 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> You wouldn't believe the number of baked spuds that were tossed out at
> night.  We used to complain - can't you give all that food to a soup kitchen
> or a homeless mission or something?  Apparently it was (is?) against health
> department regulations.  Such a waste.

It is indeed a waste... but don't think that some of that did not go to 
feed the homeless.

Not all restaurants are putting their dumpsters inside of covered cages.

To me, that's a pretty selfish practice.

============================

From: "l, not -l" <lallin[at]cujo.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 13:27:33 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It is indeed a waste... but don't think that some of that did not go to
> feed the homeless.
>
> Not all restaurants are putting their dumpsters inside of covered cages.

Panera Bread, locally known as Saint Louis Bread Co., has a community sevice
program called Operation Dough-Nation.  It collects funds that are donated
to Operation Food Search, and all bakery products unsold at the end of the
business day are donated to local food pantries.
That's just one of the reasons they are a favorite of mine for food
on-the-go or the occasional baked item when I can't make my own.

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:22:27 -0400
--------
l, not -l wrote:
> Panera Bread, locally known as Saint Louis Bread Co., has a community sevice
> program called Operation Dough-Nation.  It collects funds that are donated
> to Operation Food Search, and all bakery products unsold at the end of the
> business day are donated to local food pantries.
> That's just one of the reasons they are a favorite of mine for food
> on-the-go or the occasional baked item when I can't make my own.

Usually people/organizations who never mention it are the largest 
charitable contributers. I know mom &amp; pop places (who never mention it) 
who are tremendous supporters of operations to feed homeless/low income 
people. I know one local guy who funds a Thanksgiving and Christmas 
turkey dinner each year for thousands of people. They also do home 
deliveries for those who can't come. His name is (intentionally) never 
mentioned. I know another guy who was the reason that a modern kitchen 
facility was built in another town and has funds to operate. He doesn't 
mention it.

A friend is very active in a local church charitable operation. Just the 
other day we were talking about fundraising. He said the big box places 
love to trumpet how "they help the community" but he said the usual deal 
is that they give a $10 gift card. And people see all of the marketing 
about how community minded the big box stores are and think its covered.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:28:45 -0500
--------
"l, not -l" wrote:
> Panera Bread, locally known as Saint Louis Bread Co., has a community sevice
> program called Operation Dough-Nation.  It collects funds that are donated
> to Operation Food Search, and all bakery products unsold at the end of the
> business day are donated to local food pantries.
> That's just one of the reasons they are a favorite of mine for food
> on-the-go or the occasional baked item when I can't make my own.

Good policy.

We do have a local food bank here and the grocery stores are good about 
at least donating dented canned goods to them, or ones about to go out 
of date and are still good.

There are also some community drives to donate good stuff.

I hate to see stuff from THEM wasted tho'. One time when dad was doing 
volunteer delivery work for them. a local farmer donated a bunch of 
hubbard squashes. They tossed all of them. :-( We got a few and ate some 
and fed some to the chickens since I had them back then, but one has to 
sometimes wonder about the food bank management.

I think they thought that nobody would know how to cook them. I think 
they should have at least offered them!

They can be nuked for pity sake!

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:10:14 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It is indeed a waste... but don't think that some of that did not go to 
> feed the homeless.
> 
> Not all restaurants are putting their dumpsters inside of covered cages.

Many do that to defend themselves against the hoofties who fill the 
dumpster up to overflowing with their garbage to avoid a disposal fee. 
It is worse yet when they discard items such as tires and monitors 
because the disposal company has to separate those and then the 
restaurant is back billed.
 
> To me, that's a pretty selfish practice.

But those places are picky because of health codes. A charitable 
organization I belong to runs a chicken BBQ. We put out an excellent 
product and always sell out. One year there was crappy weather. We had 
around 100 1/2 chickens left. We called a local homeless kitchen and 
they refused to take them. It was a Sunday so we loaded them up and 
brought them to one of the guys businesses and put them in a walk in 
cooler. On Monday we called any place we could think of and were refused.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:03:53 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> But those places are picky because of health codes. A charitable 
> organization I belong to runs a chicken BBQ. We put out an excellent 
> product and always sell out. One year there was crappy weather. We had 
> around 100 1/2 chickens left. We called a local homeless kitchen and 
> they refused to take them. It was a Sunday so we loaded them up and 
> brought them to one of the guys businesses and put them in a walk in 
> cooler. On Monday we called any place we could think of and were refused.

Damn.

Did you try nursing homes or even the local fire station?

Those guys are always hungry. :-)

At that point, I think I'd have just let the employees take them home.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:36:48 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It is indeed a waste... but don't think that some of that did not go
> to feed the homeless.
>
> Not all restaurants are putting their dumpsters inside of covered
> cages.
>
> To me, that's a pretty selfish practice.

Here I go again.........back on Maui... <g>,  there was a guy who started
his own business by picking up scrap food, like potatoes that would go to
waste, or pizza that got burned and couldn't be sold, food that was sent
back in a restaurant, whatever.  Anyway, he would go from restaurant to
restaurant, pick the stuff up and would sell it to the local pig farmers for
dirt cheap!  He ended up hiring more guys to travel all over the island
because he got so many phone calls.  They'd pick the stuff up for free and
sell it.  It can't be used for human consumption (God only knows why!), but
who says pigs can't eat potatoes or any kind of leftovers?  I thought it was
a great idea; all of us islanders did.  The health department looked the
other way and everybody was happy.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:09:01 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
>   Anyway, he would go from restaurant to
> restaurant, pick the stuff up and would sell it to the local pig farmers for
> dirt cheap! 

There is still a local bread store here that sells off trays of bread to 
the pig farmers (or anyone else) for $5.00 per tray. It translates out 
to about 10 cents per lb. I used to get it for my chickens and emus when 
I had more birds. They loved it and it'd last stored in bags outdoors in 
the shade for about 1 week before it started to mold, and that was with 
a hole slit in the bags by the bread company.

I can still get it even now.

Some of the good whole wheat bread went straight into our freezer. <G>
It was 3 day old bread. Nothing at all wrong with it.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:40:52 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Not all restaurants are putting their dumpsters inside of covered cages.
>
> To me, that's a pretty selfish practice.

Selfish by whom?  In some cities, it is not possible or practical to give 
away cooked food to a shelter.  Health regulations, transportation methods, 
keeping the food hot, liability issues, make it pretty tough to give it 
away. 

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:11:35 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Selfish by whom?  In some cities, it is not possible or practical to give 
> away cooked food to a shelter.  Health regulations, transportation methods, 
> keeping the food hot, liability issues, make it pretty tough to give it 
> away. 

I'm talking about not allowing the homeless to raid your dumpsters at 
night.

That's sort of a shadow community and cannot really be covered by any 
laws. Some might consider it stealing, but it's trash. More than once, 
trashcans have been ruled as community property when neat stuff thrown 
away by celebrities has shown up on ebay, and somebody tried to sue for 
it.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:23:23 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I'm talking about not allowing the homeless to raid your dumpsters at
> night.

So you approve of "dumpster diving"?  Do you know how unsanitary that is?
It's not just food that gets tossed in those dumpsters!  Better the
restaurants be allowed to donate unused cooked food to shelters and missions
than to have people picking through garbage to find something to eat.
Sheesh!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 13:05:54 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> So you approve of "dumpster diving"?  Do you know how unsanitary that is?
> It's not just food that gets tossed in those dumpsters!  Better the
> restaurants be allowed to donate unused cooked food to shelters and missions
> than to have people picking through garbage to find something to eat.
> Sheesh!

So the truly homeless that don't have access to the food pantry's should 
starve?

Jill dear, dumpster diving for the freeway bridge residents is a fact of 
life. I suspect that the place where I buy my BBQ packages it in the 
dumpster for sanitation. I could tell by the body language of the dude I 
discussed it with. 

There are some compassionate restaurant owners.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes <jpstifel[at]isp.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:55:03 -0700
--------
Jill wrote:
> You wouldn't believe the number of baked spuds that were tossed out at
> night.  We used to complain - can't you give all that food to a soup kitchen
> or a homeless mission or something?  Apparently it was (is?) against health
> department regulations.  Such a waste.

I like leftover baked potatoes, when i make some baked potatoes for 
dinner one night i keep a few slightly under do

BTW anybody mention "canned potatoes" or "instant potatoes" gag me with 
a concept!

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:59:40 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> It IS the way they do it at Restaurants! I've never been served a baked
> spud without foil on the outside, and an oil/salt treatment on the skin.

Maybe you need to go to better restaurants.  Even Lone Star serves baked 
potatoes that are not wrapped in foil and have a nice oil/salt on the 
outside.  Every where else here serves foil wrapped potatoes.  At the places 
that serve foil wrapped potatoes I don't even bother.  At one of the places 
we go to that serves foil wrapped potatoes they have outstanding onion rings 
so I have those instead.

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:15:47 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Ok, so how do you nuke your spuds?
> 
> Roasting them on the wood grill, foil is pretty much necessary to keep 
> them from drying out. Same as in the oven.

I think the whole point of any potato roasting/grilling is to get that 
nice, slightly crispy, nutty tasting skin. Browning brings a lot of 
taste to food.

I just did grilled chicken yesterday and grilled some yukon golds. I did 
nothing but wash them and give them a couple pokes with the tip of the 
knife. They were so good that nothing was necessary except to cut up and 
eat.

As an aside it always reminds me of a kid raking leaves. A treat was to 
put potatoes into the base of the pile and let them roast in the hot ash 
when we burned the leaves.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:01:00 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> As an aside it always reminds me of a kid raking leaves. A treat was to 
> put potatoes into the base of the pile and let them roast in the hot ash 
> when we burned the leaves.

Sounds good. :-)

I suspect tho' that it might depend on the size of the spuds. Too large 
and the outside can be burned while the center can be raw. Foil helps 
with that.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:53:51 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
>  George wrote:
> >
> > As an aside it always reminds me of a kid raking leaves. A treat was to
> > put potatoes into the base of the pile and let them roast in the hot ash
> > when we burned the leaves.

Hey, suburbanite mickies!

> I suspect tho' that it might depend on the size of the spuds. Too large
> and the outside can be burned while the center can be raw. Foil helps
> with that.

Nah, that's why cavemen invented clocks... when stick cast shadow to
next rock another hour...  so cavewomen could cook smaller mammoths
for less time.  Of course cavewomen always have two minute timer,
that's when caveman finish fun and ready to eat mammoth.. and
cavewoman always knew when mammoth good and fun good, caveman grunt
loud, bring beeeerrr.. then sleep twelve shadow stick hours before
next hunt.

I read recently where they unearthed a huge Neanderthal brewery in
Texas... and one of the volunteers on the dig discovered a large stone
billboard they think translates to "Mammoth Mammary Bar. hehe

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 16:12:04 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Nah, that's why cavemen invented clocks... when stick cast shadow to
> next rock another hour...  so cavewomen could cook smaller mammoths
> for less time.  Of course cavewomen always have two minute timer,
> that's when caveman finish fun and ready to eat mammoth.. and
> cavewoman always knew when mammoth good and fun good, caveman grunt
> loud, bring beeeerrr.. then sleep twelve shadow stick hours before
> next hunt.
> 
> I read recently where they unearthed a huge Neanderthal brewery in
> Texas... and one of the volunteers on the dig discovered a large stone
> billboard they think translates to "Mammoth Mammary Bar. hehe

Leave it to you... ;-)

Label the dig "adult humor station".

<G>

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:54:18 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I suspect tho' that it might depend on the size of the spuds. Too large 
> and the outside can be burned while the center can be raw. Foil helps 
> with that.

Nah, foil is never required for roasting or grilling potatoes.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:57:13 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> Nah, foil is never required for roasting or grilling potatoes.

Even camp spuds stuck directly into the hot coals???

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:19:29 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Even camp spuds stuck directly into the hot coals???

The ash is certainly sterile so I don't see a reason why.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:21:51 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> The ash is certainly sterile so I don't see a reason why.

Ever eaten ash?

Ew!

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:27:45 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Ever eaten ash?

It easily rubs off. I have been doing it for years starting as a kid 
when we buried potatoes in the burning leave pile and then during many 
camping trips.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:05:33 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> It easily rubs off. I have been doing it for years starting as a kid 
> when we buried potatoes in the burning leave pile and then during many 
> camping trips.

Ok... but I've bitten into ash before. I don't like the texture.

I have no issues simply wrapping them loosely in foil. ;-)
To each their own!

============================

From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:59:46 +0200
--------
As I kid we had a coal fire at home and I used to put spuds in the ash 
pan under the coals.  Result was a wonderful hard crispy skinned baked 
spud with a properly cooked inside. We didn't do much to them apart from 
knocking the ash off, cutting them in half and eating with salt and butter.

Would love to be able to recreate that these days. I have tried putting 
them inside our wood burning stove but that gets too hot and the skins 
burns before the inside is cooked

Steve

PS this is not a crime , more a misdemeanour

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:40:29 -0500
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> Would love to be able to recreate that these days. I have tried putting 
> them inside our wood burning stove but that gets too hot and the skins 
> burns before the inside is cooked

Try using a potato spike.
That might help.

============================

From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 21:47:36 +0200
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Try using a potato spike.
> That might help.

Think it just too hot.

Anyone tried baking spuds in a pizza oven .

Another neighbour is just finishing the touches to one in his garden, am 
looking forward to having a go with that.

Steve

PS  Said neighbour being French will not of course want to touch potato 
skins .

============================

From: rossr35253[at]forteinc.com
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:51:28 -0400
--------
George wrote:
>I think the whole point of any potato roasting/grilling is to get that 
>nice, slightly crispy, nutty tasting skin. Browning brings a lot of 
>taste to food.

The best baked potatoes I can remember are from a long time ago, late
30's, early 40's.
When I was a kid back then, we had a coal furnace and my dad used to
put some potatoes on the ledge just inside door. Crispy skin, fluffy
white insides. Poke a line of holes along the length with a fork,
squeeze ends to pop open. Butter, a little salt and pepper -
delicious. Just won't work with the furnaces of today.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 12:32:02 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Baked while wrapped in foil spuds may as well be nuked, in fact nuked
> is better, a lot better.

I have to agree.  Wrapping potatoes in foil tends to make them more like
steamed rather than give them that nice crispy skin.  I rub butter or oil on
the potato, sprinkle generously with salt and bake them in a good hot oven
for an hour.  Of course, I also like to eat the crispy potato skins :)

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:40:20 -0400
--------
Jill wrote:
> I have to agree.  Wrapping potatoes in foil tends to make them more like
> steamed rather than give them that nice crispy skin.  I rub butter or oil on
> the potato, sprinkle generously with salt and bake them in a good hot oven
> for an hour.  Of course, I also like to eat the crispy potato skins :)

For sure, crispy browned skins are the best part of a properly baked potato.

Wrapping them in foil is like boiling french fries in water to cook 
them. It will work but it isn't much of a result.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:09:37 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I have to agree.  Wrapping potatoes in foil tends to make them more like
> steamed rather than give them that nice crispy skin.  I rub butter or oil on
> the potato, sprinkle generously with salt and bake them in a good hot oven
> for an hour.  Of course, I also like to eat the crispy potato skins :)

Anyone that passes up eating potato skins is nuts imho. :-)

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Jun 2007 16:38:53 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Anyone that passes up eating potato skins is nuts imho. :-)

Hey, scoop out an extra potato and make that part for your dad and fry the
skins for yourself!  How many carbs does a potato skin have?  Can't be all
that much.   Smother with cheese, broil, add bacon, sour cream and chives.
Yum.  Dang, I'm going to have to do that soon, now, too.  The things you
people make the rest of us do!  :-P

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 16:44:00 -0400
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Hey, scoop out an extra potato and make that part for your dad and fry the
> skins for yourself!  How many carbs does a potato skin have?  Can't be all
> that much.   

More vitamins in the skin anyway. :)
I love crispy dry potato skins, slathered in butter, salt and pepper. I 
could eat them and skip the potato just as easily as not.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 05:05:20 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> More vitamins in the skin anyway. :)

I remember once my mom told me potato skins are poisonous.  What?  Where did
you hear that?  Oh, some TV show.  Uh huh.  Well, I'm still here ;)

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:13:20 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I remember once my mom told me potato skins are poisonous.  What?  Where did
> you hear that?  Oh, some TV show.  Uh huh.  Well, I'm still here ;)

_Green_ potato skins are toxic. It's why you are supposed to store them 
in the dark. My parents taught me to always remove any potato skin that 
has turned green prior to cooking, and also watch for that when I made 
purchases.

Potatoes are in the nightshade family. Can't recall the toxin off of the 
top of my head.

<googles>

Here we go, from Snopes, but there were several other references to back 
it up on other websites. Solanine, a neurotoxin:

<a href="http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/potato.asp">http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/potato.asp</a>

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 04:42:02 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> _Green_ potato skins are toxic. It's why you are supposed to store
> them in the dark. My parents taught me to always remove any potato
> skin that has turned green prior to cooking, and also watch for that
> when I made purchases.

Yeah, I've heard that.  But I have never seen a green potato.  And most
grocery stores aren't dark even when they are closed.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 05:51:38 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Yeah, I've heard that.  But I have never seen a green potato.  And most
> grocery stores aren't dark even when they are closed.

Any decent grocery store cleans their produce displays daily.
They remove green spuds that have been exposed to light too long, if 
they stay there for that long. :-)

It's been a long time since I've seen green spuds or spuds with sprouted 
eyes. I don't shop at sleazy stores.

On rare occasions, I'll find spotty green in bagged potatoes which is 
why I prefer to hand choose them and not buy bagged. Dad is the one that 
tends to purchase bagged produce. :-P

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 16:10:26 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Hey, scoop out an extra potato and make that part for your dad and fry the
> skins for yourself!  How many carbs does a potato skin have?  Can't be all
> that much.   Smother with cheese, broil, add bacon, sour cream and chives.
> Yum.  Dang, I'm going to have to do that soon, now, too.  The things you
> people make the rest of us do!  :-P

<lol> I do SO know that feeling!

If I'm not sure what to make for dinner sometimes, I just come here. ;-)

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 13:58:41 -0700
--------
Omelet  wrote:
> Anyone that passes up eating potato skins is nuts imho. :-)

Unfortunately not everyone enjoys oral sex.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 16:12:42 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Unfortunately not everyone enjoys oral sex.

Potato skins are superior to oral sex. ;-)

Sorry!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 15:11:28 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I have to agree.  Wrapping potatoes in foil tends to make them more like
> steamed rather than give them that nice crispy skin.  I rub butter or oil on
> the potato, sprinkle generously with salt and bake them in a good hot oven
> for an hour.  Of course, I also like to eat the crispy potato skins :)

Okay, how 'bout camp spuds?
Burying the potatoes directly in hot coals.

If you don't wrap them in foil, you cannot eat the skins as they are 
coated with ash.

They come out plenty crispy. Trust me. ;-)

The foil wrapping acts like a mini-oven.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 05:19:15 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Okay, how 'bout camp spuds?
> Burying the potatoes directly in hot coals.

Um, I've been (rough) camping exactly one time and it was fun.  By rough I
mean you had to pitch tents and dig a latrine.  Not at a state campground
where there were toilets and showers.  Not the kind of place where you'd see
some RV's parked nearby!

We didn't roast potatoes in the camp fire.  We made those campfire
pocketbooks containing seasoned cubed beef (round steak, IIRC), chopped
potatoes, carrots, onions, yada yada yada and a generous splosh (there's
that technical term again) of Worcestershire sauce.  The foil packets went
into the wood fire near the hot coals, then we all sat around and talked,
drinking cold beer, for about an hour until "dinner" was served ;)

But when I roast potatoes on my trusty Weber Kettle (charcoal) grill I don't
wrap them in foil.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:20:12 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:

> Um, I've been (rough) camping exactly one time and it was fun.  By rough I
> mean you had to pitch tents and dig a latrine.  Not at a state campground
> where there were toilets and showers.  Not the kind of place where you'd see
> some RV's parked nearby!

So have I. :-)
It was my parents favorite way to camp.
They'd find a logging road and drive until they found water. Dad would 
dig a pit and place one of those folding toilet seats above it behind a 
screen of bushes and keep the shovel and the pile of dirt next to it. 
The rule was to toss a shovel full of dirt over your "leavings" when you 
were done.

Pit campfires, etc. He'd also usually have a .22 and hunt for some small 
wild game for fresh meat. Squirrels, rabbits...

porcupines. ;-)

> We didn't roast potatoes in the camp fire.  We made those campfire
> pocketbooks containing seasoned cubed beef (round steak, IIRC), chopped
> potatoes, carrots, onions, yada yada yada and a generous splosh (there's
> that technical term again) of Worcestershire sauce.  The foil packets went
> into the wood fire near the hot coals, then we all sat around and talked,
> drinking cold beer, for about an hour until "dinner" was served ;)

Sounds cool! Mom always had a cast iron pan with her and a stew pot. She 
never made the packets. Spuds got covered with foil and buried in the 
hot coals on one side of the fire pit. We carried a grate with us to 
support the pot or pan she was using to cook.

Water always got boiled before using for drinking.

Coffee was made with a percolator.

> But when I roast potatoes on my trusty Weber Kettle (charcoal) grill I don't
> wrap them in foil.

Ok. :-)

Time for me to expand my horizons...
I still have a small bag of baby reds put aside.

I don't eat potatoes with any great frequency but I really do love them.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 14:08:24 -0400
--------
ravenlynne wrote:
> This is a useful technique, IMO, to make hash browns but never for a 
> baked potato. The outside should be rubbed with oil and kosher salt and 
> wrapped in foil.

Nothing ruins a baked potato to me faster than wrapping in foil. I don't 
want a steamed potato, I want a crispy dry potato with a fluffy inside.
Oil never seemed necessary either.

sidenote: My mother taught us to never use a knife to cut our baked 
potatoes open as the knife compressed the potato inside. She taught us 
to make repeated pokes with the tines of our fork, pricking it to make a 
cross cut "line" then squeezing it open.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 11:40:33 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:

> Nothing ruins a baked potato to me faster than wrapping in foil. I don't
> want a steamed potato, I want a crispy dry potato with a fluffy inside.
> Oil never seemed necessary either.

Oiling prevents the skin from ever becoming crisp until the potato
burns.

> sidenote: My mother taught us to never use a knife to cut our baked
> potatoes open as the knife compressed the potato inside. She taught us
> to make repeated pokes with the tines of our fork, pricking it to make a
> cross cut "line" then squeezing it open.

Yup, like opening an English muffin... potatoes need nooks and
crannies too... where will the butter go, I don't want the butter
dripping straight down into my plate.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:38:25 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>sidenote: My mother taught us to never use a knife to cut our baked 
>potatoes open as the knife compressed the potato inside. She taught us 
>to make repeated pokes with the tines of our fork, pricking it to make a 
>cross cut "line" then squeezing it open.

The fork method was for english muffins.  You can use a knife and
squeeze potatoes to open.  Heck, you can cut them in half with a knife
and squeeze.  Same effect.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:43:00 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
> The fork method was for english muffins.  You can use a knife and
> squeeze potatoes to open.  Heck, you can cut them in half with a knife
> and squeeze.  Same effect.
 
No it really isn't. As I've seen, a knife cutting the potato compresses 
the inside, so it isn't as fluffy when squeezed open.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:15:14 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>No it really isn't. As I've seen, a knife cutting the potato compresses 
>the inside, so it isn't as fluffy when squeezed open.

Potato fluffing is *not* for amatures.  If you need a fork for
anything other than eating, you're an amature.

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:50:55 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> The fork method was for english muffins.  You can use a knife and
> squeeze potatoes to open.  Heck, you can cut them in half with a knife
> and squeeze.  Same effect.

I don't understand why "compressing" the potato is bad, but squeezing is 
recommended by multiple people.  I dislike squeezing.  I like some 
texture to my potato.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:57:36 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> I don't understand why "compressing" the potato is bad, but squeezing
> is recommended by multiple people.  I dislike squeezing.  I like some
> texture to my potato.

It's more like "poofing" the baked potato, Dan.  Whether you poke it with a
fork or cut a slit in it with a knife, you gently squeeze the potato with
your fingers and (if properly baked) it fluffs up.  Then you drench the
insides with butter, sour cream, whatever.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 15:25:11 -0500
--------
Jill said...
> It's more like "poofing" the baked potato, Dan.  Whether you poke it with a
> fork or cut a slit in it with a knife, you gently squeeze the potato with
> your fingers and (if properly baked) it fluffs up.  Then you drench the
> insides with butter, sour cream, whatever.

Hrrumph! I cut baked potatoes in half with a knife, turn the cut sides face 
down on the plate and with both hands, squeeze the skins off from above and 
toss them, slice the halves into slices (like a banana) and then lather 
them up with butter, sour cream and white pepper.

Anything else would simply be too civilized. :)

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 15:33:15 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> Hrrumph! I cut baked potatoes in half with a knife, turn the cut sides face 
> down on the plate and with both hands, squeeze the skins off from above and 
> toss them, slice the halves into slices (like a banana) and then lather 
> them up with butter, sour cream and white pepper.

<traumatized look> You toss the SKINS???
That's the best part! I save those for dessert!

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 15:38:17 -0500
--------
Omelet said...
> <traumatized look> You toss the SKINS???
> That's the best part! I save those for dessert!

We were forced to eat them as kids, waste not, want not, then when I left 
home... never more!

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 15:46:01 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> We were forced to eat them as kids, waste not, want not, then when I left 
> home... never more!

<sigh>

Just another example of why kids should not be forced to eat what they 
don't like. It ruins it for you when your tastes change as an adult.

I did not eat them as a kid either, and now I adore them.

I'm very (very) slowly trying to get myself to get over my hatred of 
beets. They did not taste too bad last time I prepared them. Dad loves 
them so I make them for him.

I've finally learned to really like cooked onions, but raw onions still 
make my ill.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 16:34:54 -0500
--------
Omelet said...
> Just another example of why kids should not be forced to eat what they 
> don't like. It ruins it for you when your tastes change as an adult.
> 
> I did not eat them as a kid either, and now I adore them.

I still don't miss them. ;)

> I'm very (very) slowly trying to get myself to get over my hatred of 
> beets. They did not taste too bad last time I prepared them. Dad loves 
> them so I make them for him.

None of the family liked beets so we didn't miss them!
 
> I've finally learned to really like cooked onions, but raw onions still 
> make my ill.

Sauted onions are delicious. Raw for hoagies and burgers I like in thin 
rings but not as odd-ball size chopped pieces. I detest getting a little 
sliver of onion in one bite and then a hunk of onion in another.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 16:39:39 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:

> I still don't miss them. ;)

You know I'll never criticize another's tastes. Not here. :-)
I've learned better than that.

> None of the family liked beets so we didn't miss them!

Bbbbbut, they are so GOOD for you!

Altho' the last time dad brought home fresh beets rather than the canned 
and I prepared them for him, he almost panicked the next day when it 
looked like the toilet was full of blood. <lol> It'd been so long, he 
forgot about that!

> Sauted onions are delicious. Raw for hoagies and burgers I like in thin 
> rings but not as odd-ball size chopped pieces. I detest getting a little 
> sliver of onion in one bite and then a hunk of onion in another.

Raw onions = blech and an upset stomach!

It's the differences that make the world interesting. :-)

I love making french onion soup.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 16:54:40 -0500
--------
Omelet said...
> I love making french onion soup.

What a co-oincidence, I love eating French onion soup, except it's been 20 
years since I had the "good stuff!" :(

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:29:37 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> What a co-oincidence, I love eating French onion soup, except it's been 20 
> years since I had the "good stuff!" :(

So why don't you make your own?
It's actually a pretty simple recipe. :-)

I use beef stock and 3 colors of onions.

Take 2 purple, 2 yellow and 2 white onions. Peel and cube them.
Saute' them in a skillet with some olive oil and a generous amount of 
butter. Add some lemon pepper (salt free for me), a couple of cloves of 
pressed garlic (or some garlic powder) and any other dried or fresh 
herbages to taste.

When they are cleared, dump the pan into a pot of hot beef stock.

Serve in a mug and top with croutons and some shredded cheese. Nuke (or 
put under the broiler) until the cheese melts.

I skip the croutons and it's still wonderful!

I use Jack cheese. Many others use Mozarella.

Meunster works too.

============================

From: sf
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 00:30:37 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>Hrrumph! I cut baked potatoes in half with a knife, turn the cut sides face 
>down on the plate and with both hands, squeeze the skins off from above and 
>toss them, slice the halves into slices (like a banana) and then lather 
>them up with butter, sour cream and white pepper.

You TOSS potato skins?  Heathen.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 04:09:06 -0500
--------
sf said...
> You TOSS potato skins?  Heathen.

Heh, heh, heh, heh, heh.

Andy's Evil Twin

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 10:14:50 -0700
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> 'umble opinion) .  Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

1.  Pringles.  Maybe you are lucky and don't have them there.  They come 
in a cardboard tube and faintly resemble a potato chip, except they are 
all identical and taste bad.

2.  Flavored potato chips.  Generally have way too much salt and the 
flavors taste fake (probably because they are).

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 14:09:58 -0400
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> 2.  Flavored potato chips.  Generally have way too much salt and the 
> flavors taste fake (probably because they are).

Oh but the salt and vinegar chips can be soooooo addictive!

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sat, 09 Jun 2007 18:07:55 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Oh but the salt and vinegar chips can be soooooo addictive!

Perhaps you have an addictive personality.  I hate them.

Just kidding about the personality, but I really do hate them.  I can't 
express the disappointment I feel when I think I have a potato chip and 
get one of those.

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 02:09:14 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Perhaps you have an addictive personality.  I hate them.
> 
> Just kidding about the personality, but I really do hate them.  I can't 
> express the disappointment I feel when I think I have a potato chip and 
> get one of those.

Nacho Cheese Dorito Corn Chips...

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:25:47 -0400
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Perhaps you have an addictive personality.  I hate them.
> 
> Just kidding about the personality, but I really do hate them.  I can't 
> express the disappointment I feel when I think I have a potato chip and 
> get one of those.

My favorite is simply "unflavored chips" when they are well cooked with 
a good distribution of browned chips.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:03:19 -0400
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Perhaps you have an addictive personality.  I hate them.

LOL, Negatory on the "addictive personality"good buddy, as I'm not that 
by a long shot. I just used to phrase to describe that "you never can 
eat just one" phenomenon that potato chips sometimes cause to happen?

Dill chips are good too. I rarely buy them but love a good one when I do 
get some.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 05:31:12 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> 2.  Flavored potato chips.  Generally have way too much salt and the
> flavors taste fake (probably because they are).

I've never understood  BBQ potato chips.  If I wanted potato chips to taste
like BBQ sauce I'd dip them in some sauce.  Lately I've seen "Pickle"
flavoured potato chips.  What?!

They've been doing the same thing with tortilla chips.  Doritos brand has
always been the worst about it... "Cool Ranch"  Well hell, just dip the chip
in some "Ranch" dressing.  Some people will buy anything just because they
see it on television.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 06:01:45 -0500
--------
Jill said...
> I've never understood  BBQ potato chips.  If I wanted potato chips to
> taste like BBQ sauce I'd dip them in some sauce.  Lately I've seen
> "Pickle" flavoured potato chips.  What?!
> 
> They've been doing the same thing with tortilla chips.  Doritos brand
> has always been the worst about it... "Cool Ranch"  Well hell, just dip
> the chip in some "Ranch" dressing.  Some people will buy anything just
> because they see it on television.

Yup, it's hard to find plain potato chips among the nonsense chips. And you 
have to go bottom shelf to find "no salt added" plain chips. Well I do. ;)

Then there's Pizza Hut who wants to cram another pound of cheese into their 
pizza crust AND include free cinnamon bread sticks?!?

Dumbing down the public. It's not happening in America anymore.

Another disease: Fat parents and skinny kids, for another thread.

Good morning. :(

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:44:16 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> Yup, it's hard to find plain potato chips among the nonsense chips.
> And you have to go bottom shelf to find "no salt added" plain chips.
> Well I do. ;)

I like unsalted potato chips :)  Not many people do.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:03:00 -0400
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I've never understood  BBQ potato chips.  If I wanted potato chips to taste
> like BBQ sauce I'd dip them in some sauce.  Lately I've seen "Pickle"
> flavoured potato chips.  What?!

Lay's has been making a series of special flavors for the past year or so, 
including the dill pickle.  A couple of weeks ago it was rosemary and 
garlic.  I rarely buy chips, but I did try them.  Pretty good.  I've seen 
the guys at work try all the new flavors so it must work for sales.

One of the guys order a case at a time from Herrs because he likes the 
Worcester sauce and steak flavored ones. 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:46:25 -0500
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> One of the guys order a case at a time from Herrs because he likes the
> Worcester sauce and steak flavored ones.

Um, why not just have a steak with some Worcestershire sauce on it?  Potato
chips that taste like steak and... ?  I don't get it!

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:34:01 -0400
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Um, why not just have a steak with some Worcestershire sauce on it?  Potato
> chips that taste like steak and... ?  I don't get it!

Maybe because his is single and can't cook for crap so this is a real treat. 
Last week he had bbq rib flavored chips.  I tried a couple. I'll stick to 
real ribs, thank you. 

============================

From: George <george[at]nospam.invalid>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:56:07 -0400
--------
Jill wrote:
> Um, why not just have a steak with some Worcestershire sauce on it?  Potato
> chips that taste like steak and... ?  I don't get it!

Just from observation it seems some people don't seem to know what food 
tastes like anymore. Maybe they can't cook or something. There has to be 
some reason why they like steak that is coated with something so it 
doesn't taste like steak , chips that are coated to taste like steak, 
pizza that is buried under stuff so it doesn't taste like pizza etc.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:38:35 -0700
--------
George wrote:
> Just from observation it seems some people don't seem to know what food
> tastes like anymore. Maybe they can't cook or something. There has to be
> some reason why they like steak that is coated with something so it
> doesn't taste like steak , chips that are coated to taste like steak,
> pizza that is buried under stuff so it doesn't taste like pizza etc.

That's a medical condition: "TIAD" (Taste In Ass Disease).

There's no known cure.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregory[at]morrow.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 18:00:03 GMT
--------
George wrote:
> Just from observation it seems some people don't seem to know what food
> tastes like anymore. Maybe they can't cook or something. There has to be
> some reason why they like steak that is coated with something so it
> doesn't taste like steak , chips that are coated to taste like steak,
> pizza that is buried under stuff so it doesn't taste like pizza etc.

Somebody recently described this phenomenon as "a surfeit of sauces"...

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:43:00 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Um, why not just have a steak with some Worcestershire sauce on it?  Potato
>chips that taste like steak and... ?  I don't get it!

It's *snack* food, Jill, not a meal.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:08:13 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
> It's *snack* food, Jill, not a meal.

Sad thing is, for Dave, sometimes a bag of chips is a meal. 

============================

From: Sharon <biig[at]mnsi.net>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:13:05 -0400
--------
Jill wrote:
> Um, why not just have a steak with some Worcestershire sauce on it?  Potato
> chips that taste like steak and... ?  I don't get it!

   I've tried the roasted chicken flavoured chips.  They're ok but I
wouldn't buy them again.....Sharon

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 07:39:17 -0500
--------
Sharon wrote:
>    I've tried the roasted chicken flavoured chips.  They're ok but I
> wouldn't buy them again.....Sharon

I rather like pickle chips. ;-d

Of course the Deep Fried pickle chips (made from actual pickles) sold at 
Pat's place in New Braunfels are even better!

Dipped in Ranch Dressing.

Yum!

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:05:35 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Of course the Deep Fried pickle chips (made from actual pickles) sold at 
> Pat's place in New Braunfels are even better!

Some of my Le Creuset came from an outlet store in New Braunfels. One of 
my children was going to a university in the area. I am sorry I missed 
eating at Pat's

============================

From: Omelet <omp_omelet[at]gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:56:11 -0500
--------
Becca wrote:
> Some of my Le Creuset came from an outlet store in New Braunfels. One of 
> my children was going to a university in the area. I am sorry I missed 
> eating at Pat's

Pats Place is on Union Street down the Street from the Hospital if you 
ever get back here. :-)

============================

From: Default User <defaultuserbr[at]yahoo.com>
Date: 10 Jun 2007 18:38:04 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> They've been doing the same thing with tortilla chips.  Doritos brand
> has always been the worst about it... "Cool Ranch"  Well hell, just
> dip the chip in some "Ranch" dressing.  Some people will buy anything
> just because they see it on television.

What if you aren't eating them with dip? I like the ranch ones.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 08:40:01 -0700
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
>1.  Pringles.  Maybe you are lucky and don't have them there.  They come 
>in a cardboard tube and faintly resemble a potato chip, except they are 
>all identical and taste bad.

Bet you can't eat just one!

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:20:42 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> Bet you can't eat just one!

I came close!!  I ate one and a half.  We have a potluck type lunch at our 
quilting get together once a month and yesterday somebody brought fat free 
Pringles.  ooooo, yuck.  Give me plain Lay's!

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 09:32:26 -0700
--------
Ms P wrote:
> Give me plain Lay's!

"Too good to eat just one." (Best ad campaign!)

The "Bird/Kareem Fan" Ranger 

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:48:36 -0500
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> "Too good to eat just one." (Best ad campaign!)

I personally think they're even better now that they're cooked in sunflower 
oil.

============================

From: Default User <defaultuserbr[at]yahoo.com>
Date: 10 Jun 2007 18:38:04 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> Bet you can't eat just one!

Yeah, yeah, people rag on Pringles, but I love 'em. Sue me.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 11:56:51 -0700
--------
Default User wrote:
> Yeah, yeah, people rag on Pringles, but I love 'em. Sue me.

Okay. 

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 12:43:31 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> Bet you can't eat just one!

That's correct.  I can't even eat one.  My daughter buys these, and 
politely offers me some.  I say, "no thanks".

============================

From: Don Salad <caesar[at]miskatonic.edu>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:45:14 -0600 (MDT)
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> 'Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

3) "American Pie 4: F*cking Hot Potato"

============================

From: John Butler <malcomforbes[at]gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 04:51:31 -0000
--------
Don Salad wrote:
> 3) "American Pie 4: F*cking Hot Potato"

...

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 11:20:48 -0400
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> Can anyone think of worst crimes against the poor spud  ?

Yes, sell them to McDonald's to be turned into McFries!
Or are those even made from actual potatoes?  I have my
doubts.

============================

From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 22:15:39 +0200
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> Yes, sell them to McDonald's to be turned into McFries!
> Or are those even made from actual potatoes?  I have my
> doubts.

I think McDo do put a lot of money into growing real spuds so as to get 
as uniform result as possible. It's what they then do to them 
afterwards that is questionable. here in France their "Patates" are even 
less "real" with the fake skin and all. Mind you even the McDo chips are 
better than the stringy type things served up by Quick, the "local" 
Belgian competitor, their offering is almost un-edible.


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