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Subject: Mashed Potatoes (11/97, 11/99, 1/00)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Chapman Family <34729158.9FD4ACA7[at]ihug.co.nz>...
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Hi,

Some suggestions for mashed potatoes.

1. Leave the skin on some of the potatoes (scrubbed) when cooking. Cut
all the potatoes into small cubes before cooking, leaving about 1/4 of
the potatoes with the skin on. This gives the potatoes a different
texture, and although it sounds a little weird it tastes good.

2. Mash the potatoes with butter and when mashed stir in WARM milk to
stop them being dry. They seem to be creamier with warm milk.

3. Add some garlic to the mashed potatoes, either after mashing, or to
the water as the potatoes are cooking.

4. Add some grated cheese to the potatoes after mashing. Sometimes this
gives a weird almost gluggy texture, but it's nice.

5. Add some chicken stock to the potatoes either after they are mashed,
or in the cooking water.

6. Any combination of the above.

Hope some of these help.

Anna

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From: Steve Doulis 
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 1997 11:17:35 -0500
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Or try the following...

1.    Use Warm Heavy Cream instead of milk

2.    Grate some nutmeg (Just a wee bit, don't want to overpower)

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From: troy[at]whadda.com (Troy Denkinger)
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:16:50 GMT
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Heavy cream, butter, horseradish sauce.  All to taste.  Leave all the 
skins on.  

Absolutely wonderful stuff.

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From: "Sharon Ödmann" 
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 12:57:02 -0500
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Put plenty of garlic bulbs in the water with the potatoes and let boil
until potatoes are done. Mash with heavy cream and real butter.

Or

Use a combination of potatoes and kolrabi. Tasty, too.

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From: banfstr[at]aol.com (BanFstr)
Date: 24 Nov 1997 03:07:24 GMT
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Adding sour cream to your mashed potatoes is absolutely heavenly. It seems to 
reduce the volume of potatoes when mixing in but the results are fabulous!

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From: rain[at]hothouse.iglou.com (Rain)
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 1997 17:12:00 GMT
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BA>Adding sour cream to your mashed potatoes is absolutely heavenly. It seems t

BA>reduce the volume of potatoes when mixing in but the results are fabulous!

Yup, and do squeese a little roasted garlic over the top and/or mix
in some chives.

BTW, if you want a somewhat similar effect to sour cream with less
fat, try buttermilk.  Works better than substituting yogurt, IME.

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From: hkarth 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 10:25:54 -0600
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I have been asked to bring the mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving.  Since
I live 3 hours from where we are eating, they will no longer be warm
when I arrive.  Do any of you have any suggestions on the best way to
reheat and bring mashed potatoes back to life?  Is microwaving them
acceptable? 

Hope

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From: Peter G. Aitken 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 11:37:01 -0500
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I would use the double-boiler method in preference to microwaving.

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From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 11:44:52 -0500
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>I live 3 hours from where we are eating,

In light of a 3 hour drive, I'd suggest making the mashed potatoes onsite.

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From: Dimitri 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 09:34:04 -0800
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> reheat and bring mashed potatoes back to life?  Is microwaving them
> acceptable?

Yep, microwaving over a period of time on a lower setting (< 6) would be
very acceptable.  In addition,  when transporting the freshly mashed
potatoes transport them in the pot you cooked them in. Then wrap the pot in
several layers of newspaper (top - bottom- and side) then wrap the pot and
newspapers in a large towel and put the whole thing in a box.  This should
keep them very warm and make it easy to transport.

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From: Steve Martin 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 18:54:10 GMT
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> I have been asked to bring the mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving. Since
> I live 3 hours from where we are eating, they will no longer be warm
> when I arrive

Best to do them there, but if you can't.
Boil the potatoes, drain and wrap in cling film, without mashing.
Take with you, butter, salt, pepper and milk (or thin cream).
Once there microwave the potatoes in the cling film enough to warm
them.  Microwave the milk and butter in a large bowl until very hot,
add potatoes and mash and beat like the devil, adding salt and pepper
to taste.
No I have never actually done it.

Beat some of the potatoes with warm olive oil, instead of the milk and
butter, to offer a choice.

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From: SANDRA L WHALEN 
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 15:23:54 -0600
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Prepare the potatoes like normal except add more milk and butter, a much
thinner mashed potatoes.  Put them in a crockpot and take it with you.  Plug
on low about an hour before serving and stir frequently.  This is how I
always do mashed potatoes for family dinners.  I use red potatoes, canned
milk and stix margarine.

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From: cryambers[at]aol.com (pat)
Date: 24 Nov 1999 01:30:35 GMT
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SANDRA L WHALEN  wrote:
>Prepare the potatoes like normal except add more milk and butter, a much
>thinner mashed potatoes.  Put them in a crockpot and take it with you.  

Either do them this way or make them (start to finish) when you get to your
destination.

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From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: 17 Jan 2000 01:21:45 GMT
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Allen Taylor  wrote:
> My wife used to make a potato souffle, that was made with Philladephia
> Cream cheese.  I believe that the recipe was found on a package of the
> cream cheese.  Unfortulately she is unable to find the recipe.  Does
> anyone have a copy?

You might want to check the Philip Morris Web site. Why? Because PM makes
Philadephia Cream Cheese. The recipe and others you may want might be there.

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From: head.trollop[at]bigfoot.com (Damsel in dis Dress)
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 20:08:40 -0600
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Here's Kraft's recipe search page.  You can type in cream cheese, and it'll
generate all the recipe including that ingredient.
http://www.kraftfoods.com/html/main/recbox_nper.html

Haven't ventured in here, but here's the Philly Cream Cheese site:
http://www.kraftfoods.com/philadelphia/home/index.html

Boy, these conglomerates cover everthing!


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