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Subject: Best Potatoes to Mash?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Wazza McG <GOLDY[at]uq.net.au>
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 07:11:03 +1000
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Gidday All,

I was wondering what the best potato variety there is to mash nice and
creamy/fluffy potatoes.  My seven year old daughter really likes her mash
and now that I am starting a vegetable garden, guess what we HAVE to plant.
Er, did I mention that my daughter absolutely loves her mashed potatoes.

Also, are there any secrets out there to obtain the creamiest and fluffiest
mashed potatoes.

If anyone can help me in this matter my daughter and I would greatly
appreciate it.

Regards,

Wazza McG

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From: Stan Horwitz <stan[at]typhoon.ocis.temple.edu>
Date: 15 Jan 2000 21:20:45 GMT
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For creamy fluffy mashed potatoes, use Idaho or Russett potatoes. After boiling
the peeled potatoes, push them through a potato ricer or a hand cranked food mill
into an empty pot. Any decent housewares store will sell potato ricers and food
mills for well under $20. Put the potatoes in the pot on a low flame and through
in a few tablespoons of butter along with some milk or cream. Mash up some more
with a potato masher over low heat. Add more liquid and/or butter until you get
the taste and consistency you prefer. 

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From: maryf(aka pud) <maryf[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 04:10:06 GMT
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I have to go yukon golds here. :-).  Sorry Stan.

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From: Robb Dabbs <rddg[at]1st-uspride.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 01:28:04 -0500
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> I have to go yukon golds here. :-).  Sorry Stan.

I have found that Yukon Golds have an unnaturally sweet 
taste.  Anybody know why?

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 15:51:57 -0600
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>I was wondering what the best potato variety there is to mash nice and
>creamy/fluffy potatoes.  My seven year old daughter really likes her mash

Idaho white potatoes if possible.

You already make mashed taters for your daughter, so you ought to know what
you're making them from.

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 15:58:15 -0600
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I loved mashed potatoes as a child, but also boiled spuds.  Peel white
potatoes and cut into large (2 inch) pieces; boil in salted water until they
are tender enough to mash with a fork.  Drain potatoes and drizzle with
butter, sprinkle with salt, pepper and parsley.  Toss until well mixed and
serve.  Yum!  Think I'll do this tonight.  I'm blackening some fish and
taters would go well with it.  Hmmm, I might finish the potatoes off under
the broiler to make the outsides crispy.

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From: Ken <kbraun1[at]rochester.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 17:32:30 -0500
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Idaho. Lots of butter and a dash of milk.

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From: Peter Watson <watspro[at]onthe.net.au>
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 09:41:07 +1100
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Can't tell you whats best in the US of A... in Australia we have a huge number
of varieties now and the one I like best here is called sebago... however, for
a great taste, peal some cloves of garlic and put them in to boil with the
potatoes and just mash them up with the taties, add some chopped parsley. The
garlic taste is not strong so two or three cloves in which say 6 big taties is
good. I also think that you have to add hot milk not cold and soft butter...
plenty of salt and pepper. There is a great dish in Idia with mash... it has
an egg added and then is wrapped around (sausage like) some melted onions that
have been cooked with ginger, chilli and garlic... dipped in bessam flour and
deep fried... served with a fresh tomato sauce... bloody gorgeous!!

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From: Isabelle Boucher <absynthe[at]mindless.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 22:50:37 GMT
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Weeeellll...
Everyone seems to prefer Idaho, but I really like Yukon Gold for mashing.  I'm
not sure how commonly available they are, but they're a wonderful buttery
yellow colour and mash beautifully.  If you toss a couple of garlic cloves in
to boil with the spuds, and then mash with some sour cream, salt, pepper and
butter, they're so tasty I could eat a whole bowlful for supper (and did on
those long-ago days when I had braces and got monthly adjustments)

Izz.

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From: arianej[at]pepper.eajenkins.earthlink.net (Ariane)
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 01:03:17 GMT
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Isabelle Boucher wrote:
>Everyone seems to prefer Idaho, but I really like Yukon Gold for mashing.
	
I like Yukon Gold, too.  Mashed and mixed with a bit of milk,
salt and pepper and roasted garlic, it's great!  :)

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From: Gary O. <tractrix[at]pacbell.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 22:48:58 -0800
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Isabelle Boucher wrote:
>Everyone seems to prefer Idaho, but I really like Yukon Gold for mashing.  I'm

I love Yukon Gold for their bold, buttery flavor, but I go for the
more traditional flavor with mashed potatoes.  Idaho or Russet does
best for me.  The Yukon is just a shade more toward the waxy spectrum,
which doesn't do the fluffy mashed potatoes for me that the starchier
baking potatoes do.

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From: dream766[at]webtv.net
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 05:14:10 -0500 (EST)
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I'd have to go with Yukon Gold.  You need to be carefull not to mix the
mashed potatoes too much once you put them threw the food mill or they
may get gummy, but if prepared well by far one of the best. 

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From: jan <aintlifegrand[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 01:07:49 GMT
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My favorite is Yukon Gold.  Don't know if they
have them where you are.

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From: aquari[at]aol.com (Libby)
Date: 16 Jan 2000 16:34:57 GMT
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My personal favorites for mashed are Russets.  Boil in a bit of salted  water
after scrubbing and cutting up in about 2 inch pieces.  I leave the skins on,
but you can peel first if you want.  Drain when easily pierced with a fork, add
butter, salt, pepper and milk or half and half, and mash with a potato masher. 
Lately I've been adding a couple of spoonfuls of sour cream and a bit
ofhorseradish to them.  Best mashed potatoes in the world.

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From: Fudge <fudge[at]mv.igs.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 09:38:28 -0500
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I have grown just about every variety of potato on my farm in Eastern
Ontario. The two types I like best are Yukon Gold and Kennebec. The Kennebec
variety makes the absolute best mashed potatoes. Peel, cut in small pieces
and boil until tender. Add milk/cream, S&P, butter and a whole raw egg or
two and beat until fluffy with a blender. The eggs are optional. One of the
world's great potatoes is the New England heirloom type "Green Mountain.
This potato was certified in the late 1800's and has been around ever since
due to TASTE. It has little disease resistance especially blight tolerance
and I discontinued it due to low yields.

Try growing potatoes organically. It can be done and the reward makes it
all worth while. Never use a lot of fertilizer with potatoes. I only use a
fall rye green manure turned in about 2 weeks before planting. Nothing like
pulling fresh potatoes with silky skins out of the dirt on a warm summer
morning. And guess what? They don't turn black when boiled like the
supermarket variety .Good Luck and Bon Appetite.

Farmer John

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From: <mardi[at]mardiweb.com> (Mardi Wetmore)
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 16:27:02 -0800
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My favorite is Yukon Gold's.  They have a great texture and taste
buttery so you don't need to load them up with fat and calories.  I
make mine "smashed" rather than mashed because I like some chunks left
in the potatoes.  I just cut them up into large cubes, boil in chicken
broth (this adds more flavor), then smash them with a potato masher
with some milk and/or non-fat sour cream added.  Sometimes I throw 4-5
peeled cloves of garlic in and make garlic mashed potatoes.

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From: Catherine <pecan[at]iafrica.com>
Date: 18 Jan 2000 19:35:16 +0200
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>Also, are there any secrets out there to obtain the creamiest and fluffiest
>mashed potatoes.

A (seemingly) closely guarded secret to fluffy potatoes is to add WARM milk
to them instead of cold milk, which makes them 'tough'.

I also like to add a little bit of Colman's mustard to my mashed potatoes. 
Yummy.

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From: arast[at]inficom.com (Alex Rast)
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 09:46:44 GMT
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>I was wondering what the best potato variety there is to mash nice and
>creamy/fluffy potatoes. 

Well, there seem to be 2 main camps developing: Russet and Yukon Gold. I 
personally belong to the Yukon Gold camp. Russets are ideal for baking but 
rather too mealy IMHO for mashing. For ideal mashing you want a potato with at 
least some waxiness but not so much that they don't mash up well. The Yukon 
Gold is that potato, nicely embodied.

>Also, are there any secrets out there to obtain the creamiest and fluffiest
>mashed potatoes.

Don't overboil or they will become very mealy indeed. Go for just barely 
boiled through (soft center, but not falling-apart exterior.) Peel and quarter 
the mashed potatoes before boiling. Use of *whole* milk when mashing is 
mandatory. Just add while mashing until they start to cream up. Putting 
margarine in mashers should be a sacriledge! Use butter only. Salted seems to 
work best - if you try to add salt to the mashed potatoes along with unsalted 
butter the potatoes seem to absorb the salt too much (potatoes with unsalted 
butter, btw, will just taste REALLY bland.)

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From: Christiane <cbilezikian[at]my-deja.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 13:24:14 GMT
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Indeed, I prefer the Idaho spud as well.  However, I have a bit of a
twist to making mine and have to admit, everyone who has them asks for
the recipe.  They're addicting.

Boil up the potatoes in water, with a bit of salt.  When soft, drain and
leave in the pot.  Add a raw egg, salt, butter and nutmeg.  Beat with a
blender, adding milk until you get the desired consistency.  The nutmeg
adds a taste that's excellent.

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From: delemos[at]aol.com (Marc deLemos)
Date: 18 Jan 2000 05:36:39 GMT
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Christiane said:
>  Beat with a
>blender, adding milk until you get the desired consistency. 

Hmm..wouldn't that make them 'whipped' potatoes?  Yes, I know, I'm just picking
nits...my humble preference is hand-mashed...just enough to get the butter
mixed in

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From: Christiane <cbilezikian[at]my-deja.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 16:24:05 GMT
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Marc deLemos wrote:
> >  Beat with a
> >blender, adding milk until you get the desired consistency. 
>
> Hmm..wouldn't that make them 'whipped' potatoes?  Yes, I know, I'm just picking
> nits...my humble preference is hand-mashed...just enough to get the butter
> mixed in

picky, picky, picky. :)

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From: delemos[at]aol.com (Marc deLemos)
Date: 18 Jan 2000 19:47:46 GMT
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Christiane writes <re: hand mashing preference:
>picky, picky, picky. :)

Without a doubt :)...

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From: Christiane <cbilezikian[at]my-deja.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 13:30:38 GMT
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thank goodness I didn't say anything about putting ketchup on them!

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From: willsandychap[at]webtv.net (Bill C.)
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 12:27:39 -0500 (EST)
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Ketchup on yukon gold mashed. What could be better.

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From: delemos[at]aol.com (Marc deLemos)
Date: 20 Jan 2000 04:26:12 GMT
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willsandychap@webtv.net said:
>Ketchup on yukon gold mashed. What could be better.

Just about anything short of death, I reckon... :)

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From: wolf <wolfalso[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 12:29:54 -0800
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I don't care what anyone says.  Red potatoes are the best for
anything!  If you're going to mash them, just boil them a bit
longer.

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From: Jennifer Kho <kho[at]arts.ubc.ca>
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 12:49:31 -0800
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Hi Wazza:

The best variety to make mashed potatoes is Russet potatoes.  Buy only those
that are firm to the touch.  The secret to light and fluffy mashed potatoes is
to let the steam escape after it is cooked, about 15 minutes.  Then started
mashing in a downward direction,  add some warm milk and butter, salt and
pepper and you have the best mashed potatoes in this world.

Jen

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From: Danny Owen <pdowen[at]ualr.edu>
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 18:53:25 -0600
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I like Yukon Gold. Quarter w/ skin on. Boil till done but semi-firm. Put
in stand mixer w/ _butter_  and a little bit of heavy cream. I use the
whisk attachment and put it on 6-8 for 10-15 min to let the potatoes get
nice and fluffy and leave no lumps. Mmmmmmm. Also, putting in 2-3 cloves
of roasted garlic per potato is quite good (the secret being
well-roasted garlic).


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