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Subject: Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: SoS <reply[at]newsgroup.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 05:00:51 -0600
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Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

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From: Jeff B. <yeff at erols dot com>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 07:59:58 -0500
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> Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

No.

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From: Steve Calvin <calvin[at]vnet.ibm.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 09:13:03 -0500
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Yeff wrote:
> > Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?
> 
> No.

Sure it is. I do it all the time!  No... wait... I don't use the micro
portion of the oven, only the convection.... ;-)

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From: Helena Unzueta <varissull[at]worldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 15:52:42 GMT
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> Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Yes, of course it is.  It depends on the wattage of your oven.  20 - 30
minutes in the microwave!!???  I think not.  I have a 700 watt microwave
that has a special "potato" setting.  You could also cook one medium-sized
potato on high for 3-5 minutes and allow it to stand 5 minutes in the oven
before serving.  If you over-cook it, it will be hard around the edges.  If
you have a lower wattage oven, increase the cooking time 1 minute at a time
until you acheive success

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From: Sum <sumlin[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 18:36:35 GMT
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If you cannot wrap tin foil around it since it is Microwave, what good is it?
:-)

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From: NUKED <nonukes[at]america.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 14:29:35 -0600
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While I type this, I am nuking a potato.
So far I have heard several blood curdling screams from
the microwave, but nothing more, and nothing has blown up
(YET)......

I'll keep you informed, if the place dont blow up....

*** OH MY GOD THE POTA!#$$%^ ^&%# @^# #$ @^^$#++++==.......
__________ ##help me_____it's attacking ____   .........


This is my heart monitor
...........^............^................^...............^..............^........^...^.

^.^.^.^.^.^.^.^.^.^ /\/\/\/\/\/\/\^/\... BANG ..................... 

........................................................................................

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From: NUKED <nonukes[at]america.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 14:42:29 -0600
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WHEW !!!!!!  That was a close call, but I lived !!!!!  The potato died
though, but I ate it, and it was not too bad.  Not as good as baked
though.....
But some butter, salt, pepper, dill weed, bacon bits, and a slice of
jalapeno cheese, and a tastey quick snack in under 10 minutes.

This particular potato was getting a little soft from old age, so it
is a tad bit dry.  Since it's daytime I cant tell you if it glows in
the dark  :)

PS. I wet the potato first, to clean it, and to add moisture.

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From: singer77[at]NOSPAMteacher.com (Nancy)
Date: Sun, 04 Feb 2001 04:46:22 GMT
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And don't forget to pierce it with a fork a few times.  I have done
them in the microwave when I really HAVE to.  They are not as good as
grilled or regular oven but do-able.  

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From: Jim Kajpust <jkajpust[at]concentricRATS.net>
Date: 04 Feb 2001 06:18:45 GMT
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To pick a nit - No. Baking is a dry heat process and microwaving uses
a moisture based internal heat. 

However, you can cook a potato in a microwave -- tho' I much prefer a
conventional oven baked potato. BTW, I've cooked a bunch of taters in
my microwave and have yet to blow one up because it wasn't punctured.

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From: malan6[at]qwest.net (Alan)
Date: Sun, 04 Feb 2001 11:37:15 -0600
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Jim Kajpust gave this insight:
: I've cooked a bunch of taters in
:my microwave and have yet to blow one up because it wasn't punctured.

I nuked them for years before one exploded.  Then, the time I spent
cleaning the inside of the microwave made me start piercing them with
a fork.

The key there is to stick a fork through the thickest part of the
potato (from the side) so that it penetrates all the way to the
center.   This lets steam out.

If you put the pierced side down, you'll find that the bottom of the
potato is much more cooked than the top half -- probably because the
steam gets out through the piercing, thus heating up that part of the
potato.

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From: Jim Kajpust <jkajpust[at]concentricRATS.net>
Date: 04 Feb 2001 19:36:04 GMT
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>I nuked them for years before one exploded.  Then, the time I spent
>cleaning the inside of the microwave made me start piercing them with
>a fork.

Maybe it's just the holier than thou, taters I use?

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From: Stan Horwitz <stan[at]typhoon.ocis.temple.edu>
Date: 4 Feb 2001 18:21:03 GMT
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Jim K wrote:
> I've cooked a bunch of taters in
> my microwave and have yet to blow one up because it wasn't punctured.

There's still a risk that it can happen. Same with cooking a potato
in a conventional oven. Considering how ridiculously easy it is to
prick a potato with a knife or fork and how it makes no difference
in the finished product, there isn't any good reason not to do it.

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From: judgmoore[at]cs.com (Judith Moore)
Date: 05 Feb 2001 20:12:26 GMT
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>BTW, I've cooked a bunch of taters in
>my microwave and have yet to blow one up because it wasn't punctured.

Just wait. And stay away from eggplants.

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From: Wendy <reply[at]newsgroup.com>
Date: Sun, 04 Feb 2001 02:06:43 -0600
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>And don't forget to pierce it with a fork a few times. 

Just curious.  What happens if you dont pierce them?
Do they explode?  Dont feel like trying it !

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From: Stan Horwitz <stan[at]typhoon.ocis.temple.edu>
Date: 4 Feb 2001 18:22:34 GMT
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Wendy wrote:
> Just curious.  What happens if you dont pierce them?
> Do they explode?  Dont feel like trying it !

A potato that's not pricked with a knife or fork can
explode. This is as true in a microwave oven as it is
in a conventional oven. The odds of this happening is
slim, but the result is truly a mess so since it is
so easy to prick a potato, why not do it?

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From: Chris Nelson <chris[at]pinebush.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 08:43:23 -0500
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SoS wrote:
> Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Yes, of course.  Well, sort of.  The skin won't be crisp and dry as it
would be if done in a "real" oven but a reasonable facsimile can be
achieved.

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From: Kelly Sutton <ladypenguin[at]i2k.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:52:13 -0500
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It seems like when you "bake" a potato in the microwave that it turns out
sort of "different",
for lack of a better way of putting it.  The texture seems different, it
gets sort of gummy around the edges...
There's nothing like a baked potato out of the oven; it's a whole different
experience from a nuked one.

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From: Jeff B. <yeff at erols dot com>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 10:30:20 -0500
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Kelly Sutton wrote : 
> It seems like when you "bake" a potato in the microwave that it turns out
> sort of "different",

That's because you're not baking it (no dry heat).

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From: Stan Horwitz <stan[at]typhoon.ocis.temple.edu>
Date: 2 Feb 2001 14:01:29 GMT
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SoS <reply@newsgroup.com> wrote:
> Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Well, you can certainly cook a potato in a microwave.
The results might be pleasing to you, or they might not
be. Potatoes cooked in the microwave can be quite tasty
as far as some people are concerned, but in my opinion,
they are quite different from a potato that's actually
baked in a conventional oven. The skin is different
and so is the texture of the potato.

============================

From: Leonard Lehew <leonard-lehew[at]nc.rr.EXTRA.JUNK.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 14:05:53 GMT
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SoS wrote:
>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

You can _cook_ a potato in a microwave, but it is not the same as
baking. The result is more steamed that baked. If you want to try it,
pierce the potato deeply with a fork in several places, and cook it in
the microwave for 20-30 minutes. Some people like this, but baking in
the oven produces better results. I prefer to put a light coating of
peanut oil and kosher salt on the potato and bake it directly on the
rack of a conventional oven.

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From: cwells21[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com (Cathy Wells)
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 16:41:47 GMT
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SoS wrote:
>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

No. You can COOK a potato in the microwave but it won't come out the
same way a baked potato comes out of a conventional oven.

What you get when you cook a potato in the  microwave is essentially a
steamed potato. The skin won't be dry and crispy like a baked potato,
and the texture of the potato flesh is very different froma baked
potato. But it's perfectly edible. Experiment with it - for an average
size potato 5-7 minutes on High should do it for you.

============================

From: "Peter G. Aitken" <peter[at]pgacon.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 16:43:42 GMT
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SoS wrote:
> Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

You can cook a potato in the MW but not bake it. Texture won't be the same,
and you can forget about a crispy skin.

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From: Denise~* <denise[at]nexuscomputing.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 08:52:07 -0800
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SoS wrote:
>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

There are a bunch of great responses below, but one thing you need to
remember is to pierce the skin with a fork in a couple places, and
they turn out much better if you let them sit after "microing"
When the sit, they continue to cook.
5 to 8 minutes depending on size of "average" potato.

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From: IcemanJim[at]webtv.net (James Trussel)
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 13:18:02 -0800 (PST)
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no one has mentioned turning the potato over.Average potato 3 min. on
one side,turn it over for 3 min. on other side.

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From: catmandy99[at]aol.comcrap (Sheryl Rosen)
Date: 02 Feb 2001 17:35:04 GMT
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>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

The answer is: Sort of.

You can cook a potato in a microwave.

But it will be closer in texture to a boiled potato. Or, similar in texture to
wrapping a potato in foil and baking it in the oven.

If you don't like crispy skins on your potato, go for it. You will really like
the results. Quick and just the way you like 'em.

If you do like crispy skins, it won't be quite the same as if you baked it in
the oven without foil, but it will certainly be fast, and if you're hungry,
there's nothing wrong with a microwaved potato.

Just don't call it a "baked" potato.

Baking requires dry heat. You just don't get that in a microwave oven.

That's why someone said "no" to your question, because technically, it's not
baking in there.

But, sure, you can cook a pototo in there.
About 3 minutes for a potato about 3 inches long and 2 inches wide. (900 watt
oven).  

Good luck.
Sheryl

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From: Gargoylle <gargoylle[at]postmaster.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 12:03:46 -0600
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>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

If you're trying to save time you can nuke for a few minutes, and toss
them in a 500 degree oven to crisp the skin up. It's not the best, but
it will save time. You didn't state why you want to do it in a
microwave, but if you don't have an oven, a toaster oven works very
well for crisping the skin. As others have stated, nothing will be
like baking, or my favorite: the grill.

Gar   

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From: red_car[at]webtv.net (Gene H Baker)
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 13:26:23 -0800 (PST)
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YES : it is possible to bake potatoes in a microwave, i do it all a
time, just wash your potatoes and dry them good. i take a fork and punch
some holes in the potato to let the steam out while cooking. then you
can microwave on high setting for 5 to 7 min. they come out real good.
try it.

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From: Peter Parry <peter[at]wpp.ltd.uk>
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 22:25:17 GMT
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>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Very successfully, make sure you prod it with a fork a few times
first though otherwise steam build up under the skin can cause it to
split with some force (not enough to cause harm but enough to startle
you and ruin your baked potato).

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From: Jeff B. <yeff at erols dot com>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 18:08:20 -0500
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Peter Parry wrote:
> >Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?
>
> Very successfully

Really?  Can I also bake a potato in
a pot of boiling water?

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From: j-lattie[at]neiu.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 20:50:03 GMT
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Yeff wrote:
>Really?  Can I also bake a potato in
>a pot of boiling water?

Uhm, er ....  boiling water is boiling, not baking.

but both work

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From: Jack Schidt <jack.schidt[at]attdotnet>
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 21:09:37 GMT
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Using a microwave steams a potato.  The only way to bake
anything is in an oven.

Jack Baked

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From: judgmoore[at]cs.com (Judith Moore)
Date: 21 Mar 2001 19:33:12 GMT
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The last time I wasn't paying attention, someone posted a method for using a
m'wave to start a baked potato which one then finished in the oven. Seemed to
me to be an excellent idea -- fast-cooking m'wave advantage with oven
crispy/baked outcome. Does anyone have the particulars?

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From: Familie Nelles <luc.nelles[at]worldonline.be>
Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 21:35:02 GMT
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Judith Moore wrote:
> The last time I wasn't paying attention, someone posted a method for using a
> m'wave to start a baked potato which one then finished in the oven.

Sure, I always do it that way.  Cut them lengthwise, and put them in the
microwave 'till they are almost done.  Then put some garlic and rosemary on it,
and put them in the over, or faster still under a grill, untill they are brown.
Ria

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From: Craig Bennett <theclyde[at]mindless.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 15:14:01 -0600
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Yeah - I think bake was used here in a generic sense to mean cook. Sort of
like kleenex is used as a term for facial tissues.

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From: j-lattie[at]neiu.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 21:40:53 GMT
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Craig Bennett wrote:
>Yeah - I think bake was used here in a generic sense to mean cook. Sort of
>like kleenex is used as a term for facial tissues.

But a potato would make a very poor substitute for a Kleenex.

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From: Craig Bennett <theclyde[at]mindless.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 15:44:40 -0600
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>But a potato would make a very poor substitute for a Kleenex.

And putting a box of kleenex in a hot oven is just asking for trouble..

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From: Stan Horwitz <stan[at]typhoon.ocis.temple.edu>
Date: 20 Mar 2001 22:20:06 GMT
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Craig Bennett wrote:
> And putting a box of kleenex in a hot oven is just asking for trouble..

True, but I would be surprised if some people were not stupid enough
to try such a stunt!

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From: Craig Bennett <theclyde[at]mindless.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 07:56:46 -0600
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>> And putting a box of kleenex in a hot oven is just asking for trouble..
>
>True, but I would be surprised if some people were not stupid enough
>to try such a stunt!

Before you know it there will be a warning label on your kleenex box

"Warning: This product is not a potato, and should not be baked"

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From: margali <margali[at]99main.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 12:54:32 -0500
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>> And putting a box of kleenex in a hot oven is just asking for trouble..
>
>True, but I would be surprised if some people were not stupid enough
>to try such a stunt!

Why not - I had a roommate decide to make a hot sandwich by putting the
thing on a paper plate into my toaster oven and get very confused when
it started to burn - she had been brought up with a microwave oven and
had never seen a toaster oven.

Got to love kids nowadays - otherwise they would get killed off!

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From: blakem[at]ix.netcom.com (blake murphy)
Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 05:35:14 GMT
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>But a potato would make a very poor substitute for a Kleenex.

eh, don't knock it if you haven't tried it.  ram one up your nose, and
it takes care of that post-nasal drip...

your pal,
blake

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From: Sara <sarazarr[at]qwest.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Mar 2001 14:20:37 -0700
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Try this:

Preheat your conventional oven to 400 F.  Wash 2, unblemished, firm
russet potatoes.  Microwave them on high for 6 minutes (or 1 potato
for 4 minutes).  Transfer to baking sheet and bake in preheated oven
for 15 minutes or until tender when pierced with fork.

Best of both worlds.

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From: Goose <liquiddirt[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 02:55:51 GMT
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Here's how I do it when in a pinch for time:
Wrap the potato's in damp paper towels.  Microwave about 5 to 7 minutes for
each potato.  Once the microwave stops, remove the potato's and wrap with
aluminum foil.  Slightly squeeze the potato and let set till ready to serve.
That's about as close as you can get to baked without baking :(

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From: Craig Bennett <theclyde[at]mindless.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 07:59:27 -0600
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Now if you want a good potato on the BBQ...

Take one box kleenex..  errr, one potato. Slice it not all the way through
in 5-8 places depending on the size of the tat (be sure the bottom still
holds the slices together.  In each slice, insert a thin slice of onion,
and a couple thin slices of garlic, and a dab of butter (I usually do the
butter first). Put on a piece of aluminum foil. Lightly pepper and sprinkle
with some oregano. Wrap in foil and bbq (or bake) till it is done.

============================

From: kim977[at]webtv.net (SNAKE LADY)
Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 11:07:43 -0600 (CST)
--------
sure you can boil a potatoe in the microwave. i have for years. take a
potatoe, make a small slice in the middle of it, put it in a zip lock
baggy with about a inch of water and close/zip it up. be sure to poke a
whole at the top of the baggy. depending on the size of your potatoe it
will take anywhere from 5 to 8 minutes. you'll just have to check it and
see if it's done by jabbing a fork in the potatoe.

 Dont tread on the Snake Lady ! !

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From: Dan <danrcan[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 12:33:30 GMT
--------
> sure you can boil a potatoe in the microwave. i have for years.

Sort of pointless to "boil" a potato in a microwave.

but to bake one, saves lots of time and energy and they come out perfect.

Be sure to poke holes in it in several places with a fork.... takes about 4
minutes per potato in a 600 watt oven.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski <esp[at]snet.net>
Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 21:52:56 -0500
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You can cook a potato in a microwave, but you need an oven to bake one.
Baking involves dry heat. For potatoes, this IMO, far superior as it will
crisp the skin.  Molecular stimulation to generate heat by friction is not
baking.  Not a bad way to go if pressed for time though.
Ed

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From: Tom Royer <troyer[at]mitre.org>
Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:33:07 -0500
--------
> You can cook a potato in a microwave, but you need an oven to bake one.

Plus, you can save a lot of time if you nuke the potato for,
maybe, 2 to 2 and a half minutes, then put it in the oven.

Only takes about half an hour for a good baked potato with crisp skin.

============================

From: catmandy99[at]aol.comcrap (Sheryl)
Date: 30 Mar 2001 02:47:13 GMT
--------
>You can cook a potato in a microwave, but you need an oven to bake one.
>Baking involves dry heat.

I gotta go with Ed on this one.

You can certainly COOK a potato in a microwave, and it is a tasty alternative
to a boiled potato, for sure.  And a decent sub for a baked potato. 

But a BAKED potato requires an oven. Even a toaster oven is ok.

If you're pressed for time, a nuked potato is  certainly edible--even
delicious, with sour cream and Sunny Paris seasoning.

However, if you are someone who wraps your potatoes in foil before putting them
in the oven, then a nuked potato is going to taste pretty much the same as a
potato baked that way. 

If you like crispy skins on your potatoes, which I do, then a microwave potato
is going to be lacking.

Sometimes, I nuke the spud in the microwave oven, then put it into the toaster
oven for a little while to crisp the skin.  Saves time and the results aren't
bad at all.

============================

From: marcella[at]peek.org (Marcella Tracy Peek)
Date: Fri, 30 Mar 2001 17:25:29 GMT
--------
>You can cook a potato in a microwave, but you need an oven to bake one.
>Baking involves dry heat.

Absolutely!  They do taste very different.  One thing I have done when
pressed for time is wash, prick with a fork, and then nuke a few potatoes
in the microwave for 3-4 minutes.  Then I put them in the oven at 350 for
20 minutes.  It finishes the cooking and drys them out so they are fluffy.

============================

From: jyanikX[at]kua.net (Jim Yanik)
Date: 2 Feb 2001 18:11:44 -0600
--------
>Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Don't people READ their microwave manuals? If you don't have one,visit a 
used book store.

============================

From: malan6[at]qwest.net (Alan)
Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 12:13:41 -0600
--------
:Is it possible to bake a potato in a microwave?

Sort of.    We call them "nuked" potatoes, and they're different from
ones baked in a conventional oven.

However, at 4 minutes per (versus an hour) we like the nuked ones a
lot!

============================

From: smm3[at]pacbell.net (Sanford)
Date: Sun, 04 Feb 2001 17:32:47 GMT
--------
After nuking'em, cut'em in half and garnish with butter/margerine,
cheese, scallions and seasoning to taste. Place in broiler for a
couple of minutes. Quick and tasty....

============================

From: catmandy99[at]aol.comcrap (Sheryl Rosen)
Date: 04 Feb 2001 19:20:08 GMT
--------
Re: piercing the skin on a potato before baking or nuking

I have always, after scrubbing them, just pierced the skin with a finger nail a
few times before sticking in the cooker.

If I have a lot to do, I'll take a fork and jab away, but if I only have one, I
have found the fingernail trick works fine.


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