[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]

Subject: MW baked potato
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Ken Knecht 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:49:58 GMT
--------
Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave that 
taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

TIA

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 11:57:48 -0500
--------
Hello, Ken!

I'm not being very helpful am I but I don't think it is possible 
;-(  There is a special flavor that comes with the crisping of 
the skin of an oven-baked potato, not that nuked potatoes are 
all that bad! If you have 4 to 6 potatoes to cook, it won't take 
all that much longer in the conventional oven.

============================

From: Dawn 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 09:09:13 -0800
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave that
> taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

Nuked potatoes tend to steam and get a bit rubbery. However, a few
minutes in the microwave can dramatically shorten the time they need to
be in the oven. I tend to start my potatoes by getting them hot and
just starting to steam, then put them in the big oven for the remaining
time. If it is a really large one, you may need to turn it over midway
in the microwave, as they will get soggy on the bottom side if they sit
in the same position too long, and cook unevenly. 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 12:12:02 -0500
--------
Dawn wrote:
> Nuked potatoes tend to steam and get a bit rubbery. However, a few
> minutes in the microwave can dramatically shorten the time they need to
> be in the oven. I tend to start my potatoes by getting them hot and
> just starting to steam, then put them in the big oven for the remaining
> time. If it is a really large one, you may need to turn it over midway
> in the microwave, as they will get soggy on the bottom side if they sit
> in the same position too long, and cook unevenly.

Excellent advice. 

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 10:50:33 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Excellent advice.

Nonsense... that's no advice at all.

There's no point in using both nuker and conventional oven... if only
one, two, or even three potatoes then may as well finish in the
nuker... there is no sense in heating an entire oven for just one, two,
or three potatoes.  And with more than four the time is going to be
close to the same with either oven.  And I wouldn't light my oven for
less than six baked potatoes... in fact I wouldn't light my oven
regardless for just baked potatoes.. at the very least may as well
roast a chicken too.

And I see nothing awful about nuked potatoes... main difference is that
the skin doesn't become a crisp shell, but so what... the vast majority
of baked potato eaters don't eat any of the skin anyway, just ask
anyone who clears restaurant tables... not only don't they eat the skin
most folks barely eat half the insides.  Most folks attack the entree
first while it's still hot, then by the time they've finished they're
too stuffed to be filling up on potato, especially because by then
they're contemplating dessert.  I've witnessed the same phenomena when
serving guests at home, most of the baked potatoes end up in the
garbage... I no longer make baked potatoes for guests, haven't for many
years.  Serve wedges of pared spuds rubbed in oil and roasted till
puffy, crispy, golden brown and folks will fight over the last piece,
can't make enough.  Baked in their jackets spuds is the fare of
impoverished Irish... stolen potatoes they roast in an open fire,
they're called mickys, the spuds too. hehe

============================

From: John Kane 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 12:29:51 -0800
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> And I see nothing awful about nuked potatoes... main difference is that
> the skin doesn't become a crisp shell, but so what... the vast majority
> of baked potato eaters don't eat any of the skin anyway, just ask
> anyone who clears restaurant tables... not only don't they eat the skin
> most folks barely eat half the insides.

What?  In my family the skins, loaded with butter,  are the best part
of a baked potato.  The insides are okay but come a sad second to
crispy potato skins.  Stuffed baked potatos are delicious.

There is nothing wrong with a nuked potato, but it has nothing in
common with a real baked potato,  it is much more like a boiled or
steamed potato.  

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:14:02 -0500
--------
John Kane wrote:
> What?  In my family the skins, loaded with butter,  are the best part
> of a baked potato.  The insides are okay but come a sad second to
> crispy potato skins. 

I'm so with ya there!A nice dry crispy potato skin, with lots of butter, 
salt and pepper, make the best start to a meal. As children we were 
allowed to gather at the table and enjoy the potato skins immediately, 
even while my mother was serving out the rest of the meal so we could 
enjoy them at their best.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:17:15 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I'm so with ya there!A nice dry crispy potato skin, with lots of butter, 
> salt and pepper, make the best start to a meal. As children we were 
> allowed to gather at the table and enjoy the potato skins immediately, 
> even while my mother was serving out the rest of the meal so we could 
> enjoy them at their best.

Usually a baked potato (half of one of those enormous ones, anyway) is
a side dish, and I eat some of the potato guts and the skin is wrapped up
and saved for breakfast.  I zap it until it's warm and butter it.

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 04:57:24 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Usually a baked potato (half of one of those enormous ones, anyway) is
> a side dish, and I eat some of the potato guts and the skin is wrapped
> up and saved for breakfast.  I zap it until it's warm and butter it.

right outa the fridge slice it into coins...skin and all... lightly butter 
and salt and pepper each coin and eat. Cold baked potatoes...a comfort food 
from my youth.

============================

From: Serene 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 22:33:55 -0800
--------
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>right outa the fridge slice it into coins...skin and all... lightly butter 
>and salt and pepper each coin and eat. Cold baked potatoes...a comfort food 
>from my youth.

Cold baked potatoes, a little mayo, optional minced onion.  Yumma.

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:14:11 GMT
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave
> that taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

There is no recipe...The best Baked potatoes are made by 
washing/scrubbing the spuds well, drying them...rubbing the skin with a 
little oil and sprinkling them lightly with salt, forking them to allow 
for venting (no exploding potatoes that way) and baking for approx 1 hr 
at 400F plus.

The best you can do with a microwave is make steamed potatoes in their 
jackets. Which is ok... but don't get me wrong...it ain't a baked spud.

Some time can be saved though...by nuking the potatoes for say 5 
minutes...while the oven comes to temp. This can save you 20 minutes 
maybe.

These are 2 totally diffent cooking methods...oven cooking allows some of 
the moisture to evaporate away...the microwave doesn't. Is the easiest 
way to explain it.

The foiled wrapped method is just a restaurant method of allowing the 
potatoes to be eatable after many hours...as they don't cook them to 
order but do many potatoes at opening time to last throughout the night.

The true baked potato with a nice crisp skin means allowing it to bake 
till the skin makes a russeling noise when handled.

With a tougher crisper skin... twice baked potatoes are a possibility...
Scoop out the potato innards...taking care not to puncture the skin. 
Coarsely mash...Mix these innards with butter, cheese , cooked crumbled 
bacon, chives, chopped cooked mushrooms or what ever...Place back in the 
skins and bake till the cheese melts and the potatoes firm up a bit.

============================

From: Steve Wolstenholme 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 18:42:48 +0000
--------
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
>There is no recipe...The best Baked potatoes are made by 
>washing/scrubbing the spuds well, drying them...rubbing the skin with a 
>little oil and sprinkling them lightly with salt, forking them to allow 
>for venting (no exploding potatoes that way) and baking for approx 1 hr 
>at 400F plus.

They are even better cooked in an earthenware pot rather that in the
oven. Slightly charred!

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 12:55:58 -0600
--------
Mr Libido Incognito said...
> There is no recipe...The best Baked potatoes are made by 
> washing/scrubbing the spuds well, drying them...rubbing the skin with a 
> little oil and sprinkling them lightly with salt, forking them to allow 
> for venting (no exploding potatoes that way) and baking for approx 1 hr 
> at 400F plus.

I just scrub the spuds, don't dry, don't oil, don't salt and don't fork them. 
At 375 F. for 45 minutes.

I always cut the spuds in half when done and squeeze the skin off. I know, 
that's probably breaking some spud law, but I've already ate my lifetime 1 
lb. of dirt requirement. ;)

============================

From: Default User 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 20:35:36 GMT
--------
Andy wrote:
> I just scrub the spuds, don't dry, don't oil, don't salt and don't
> fork them.  At 375 F. for 45 minutes.

Heh. I never used to fork them, then one explodiated in the oven one
time. Talk about a mess.

Brian

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:16:00 -0500
--------
Default User wrote:
> Heh. I never used to fork them, then one explodiated in the oven one
> time. Talk about a mess.

Not only do they need forking before baking to avoid exploding, my 
mother insisted that we use our forks to open the potato up. She felt a 
knife would compact the tender dry insides too much. We would make a 
line of fork holes lengthwise, then crosswise and then squeeze the 
potato open.

============================

From: ms_peacock 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:23:49 -0600
--------
Default User wrote:
> Heh. I never used to fork them, then one explodiated in the oven one
> time. Talk about a mess.

Yup, and once you've had to clean up an explodiated potato you *never* 
forget to poke it!!

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:41:37 -0600
--------
ms_peacock said...
> Yup, and once you've had to clean up an explodiated potato you *never* 
> forget to poke it!!

Wait a second... I was talking about regular baking in the oven baked 
potatoes. The explodiated potato is the nucularized potato, right??

I've never seen a potato burst in a regular oven in all my life!

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:58:43 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> Wait a second... I was talking about regular baking in the oven baked 
> potatoes. The explodiated potato is the nucularized potato, right??
> 
> I've never seen a potato burst in a regular oven in all my life!

I recall it happened on occasion as a child. That was before we had a 
microwave oven.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:18:05 -0600
--------
Goomba38 said...
> I recall it happened on occasion as a child. That was before we had a 
> microwave oven.

I remember once, I left the house with potatoes in the oven. When I came 
back hours later, the potatoes were just empty shells. The pulp just 
evaporated.

============================

From: ms_peacock 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:10:57 -0600
--------
Andy wrote:
> Wait a second... I was talking about regular baking in the oven baked
> potatoes. The explodiated potato is the nucularized potato, right??
>
> I've never seen a potato burst in a regular oven in all my life!

Nope, regular ol' oven explodiated baked potato.  It was a pain to clean up. 
Since that was long before microwaves and I have always poked potatoes since 
the explodiating event I never had one blow up in the nuker.

============================

From: Default User 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 22:26:34 GMT
--------
Andy wrote:

> Wait a second... I was talking about regular baking in the oven baked 
> potatoes. The explodiated potato is the nucularized potato, right??

Nope.

> I've never seen a potato burst in a regular oven in all my life!

Trust me, it can happen. Potato spews all over a hot oven, cooking onto
ever surface.

Brian

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 03:07:40 GMT
--------
Andy wrote:
> I've never seen a potato burst in a regular oven in all my life!

I've had it happen in a conventional oven and it is messy and stinks up the 
house...[Can you say burning potato? I knew you could]...It only seems to 
happen when company is coming over and it's about 10 minutes before they 
arrive.

Since then I fork the spuds.

============================

From: Default User 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 22:25:24 GMT
--------
ms_peacock wrote:
> Yup, and once you've had to clean up an explodiated potato you never
> forget to poke it!!

The funny thing was, the potato that remained in the skin was some of
the best ever, very fluffy. The process to get that though . . .

Brian

============================

From: sandi 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 17:18:46 GMT
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the
> microwave that taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

I poke holes (fairly deep) with a fork on 4 sides and both ends.  
Then micro 1/2 way flip over and continue 'baking'  Depending on 
size you can nuke from 3 to 9+ minutes.  My medium sided  potatoes 
nuke for about 4 to 4 1/2 minutes.  Then let them sit for a few 
minutes before eating.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:23:24 -0600
--------
sandi wrote:
>I poke holes (fairly deep) with a fork on 4 sides and both ends.  
>Then micro 1/2 way flip over and continue 'baking'  Depending on 
>size you can nuke from 3 to 9+ minutes.  My medium sided  potatoes 
>nuke for about 4 to 4 1/2 minutes.  Then let them sit for a few 
>minutes before eating.

Two things:

1.  When I had my first microwave, I nuked potatoes for
about 10 years, without poking holes in them, until one
finally exploded.  I don't think it really happens all that
often.   And, if it does, a microwave is MUCH easier to
clean than a regular oven!

That said, I always poke a hole with a fork, all the way to
the center of the potato.

2.  Nuking potatoes is what I do when I'm going to make
mashed potatoes.  The nuked potatoes have much more texture
and flavor than boiled ones!

BTW, I like the skins, and they get mashed along with the
potato bodies....

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:28:03 -0500
--------
Alan Moorman wrote

> 1.  When I had my first microwave, I nuked potatoes for
> about 10 years, without poking holes in them, until one
> finally exploded.

Yeah, well, microwave anything for that long, what do you expect?

> BTW, I like the skins, and they get mashed along with the
> potato bodies....

I like the skins in my mashed potatoes once in a while, too.

Next up I'm going to make baked potato soup, but I make them
in the oven.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:41:34 -0500
--------
The Ranger wrote
>> Next up I'm going to make baked potato soup, [..]
>
> Got a favorite recipe?

No, I don't, just every time I see it mentioned I think, I want
to make that.  I'm sure Jill has posted one.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:02:23 -0600
--------
The Ranger said...
>> Next up I'm going to make baked potato soup, [..]
> 
> Got a favorite recipe?

Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken or turkey gravy 
mushed up?!?

============================

From: The Ranger 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 14:11:47 -0800
--------
Andy wrote:
> Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken
> or turkey gravy mushed up?!?

Not really. Here's a post answering my request for a recipe. I
haven't tried but a couple...

Date:  Wed, Jun 28 2000 12:00 am
Email: Price 

The Ranger wrote:
> Would like to try making a leek and potato soup. Any tried-n-true
> recipes that anyone would like to share?

Hey, Ranger... Here are a few that I've used... Because of the word
wrap, some of the URL's may have to be run through a text editor
(NotePad/WordPad, etc.) before you can insert them directly into
your browsers' window...

http://www.tabasco.com/html/recipes/leekpotato_soup.html

http://souprecipe.com/az/CheesyLeekMustardSp.asp?ARRefSite=0&ARRefCoo...

http://search.yumyum.com/recipe.htm?ID=12125

http://www.ichef.com/ichef-recipes/Sauces-marinades/Sauces/34825.html

http://www.ichef.com/ichef-recipes/Soups-Stews/Soups/28064.html

http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/egg/eggslds/eggs020/crpotlee.html

http://online-cookbook.com/goto/cook?p=rpage&rid=00003E&sw=leek+potat...

http://dinnercoop.cs.cmu.edu/dinnercoop/Recipes/jody/PotatoLeekSoup.html

http://www.kitchenlink.com/msgbrd/board_1/1998/NOV/2095.html

Enjoy...!

============================

From: ms_peacock 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:14:30 -0600
--------
Andy wrote:
> Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken or turkey gravy
> mushed up?!?

It might be in your world but in my world it's soup.

Start with diced bacon and onion.  Cook until the onion is translucent.  Add 
the cold leftover diced baked potatoes, milk, celery flakes, parsley flakes, 
salt and pepper to taste.  Cook over medium heat until it's almost boiling.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:40:50 -0500
--------
ms_peacock wrote:
> Andy wrote:

>> Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken or turkey gravy
>> mushed up?!?

Sometimes when I'd eat at this one place, I'd get the cup of soup that
came with the specials.  Once in a while it would be cream of potato.
Tasted for the world like potato flake mashed potatoes, but it certainly
was more liquid than just mashed potatoes and gravy.

> It might be in your world but in my world it's soup.
>
> Start with diced bacon and onion.  Cook until the onion is translucent. 
> Add the cold leftover diced baked potatoes, milk, celery flakes, parsley 
> flakes, salt and pepper to taste.  Cook over medium heat until it's almost 
> boiling.

Sounds great, though I assumed the liquid would be chicken or vegetable
broth?  I did expect some cream would be added.

Heh, and maybe served with a little pat of butter on top, just to get
the fat and calorie content as high as possible.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:37:32 -0600
--------
Nancy Young said...
> Heh, and maybe served with a little pat of butter on top, just to get
> the fat and calorie content as high as possible.

(LAUGH!!!)

============================

From: ms_peacock 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 19:20:18 -0600
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Sounds great, though I assumed the liquid would be chicken or vegetable
> broth?  I did expect some cream would be added.

I don't want my potato soup to taste like chicken.  Since the potatoes are 
already cooked there's no need to use a liquid to cook the potatoes.  You 
can add a little cream to yours if you want.  I rarely have cream so mine is 
just milk.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 16:58:12 -0600
--------
ms_peacock said...
> Andy wrote:
>>
>> Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken or turkey gravy
>> mushed up?!?
> 
> It might be in your world but in my world it's soup.
> 
> Start with diced bacon and onion.  Cook until the onion is translucent. 
> Add the cold leftover diced baked potatoes, milk, celery flakes, parsley
> flakes, salt and pepper to taste.  Cook over medium heat until it's
> almost boiling. 

Ms P,

I like your version better!

Thanks,

Andy

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 06:29:02 -0600
--------
Andy wrote:
>Isn't baked potato soup just baked potatoes and chicken or turkey gravy 
>mushed up?!?

I do that once in a while -- make mashed potatoes with the
taters only roughly mashed, and then keep adding milk until
I get the soupy consistency I want.

Delish!

============================

From: Default User 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 22:30:47 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I like the skins in my mashed potatoes once in a while, too.

I do that sometimes as well. This past week I thawed out some turkey
from Thanksgiving, so I need mashed potatoes with it. I left the skins
on this time, not as attractive but adds flavor and nutrition.

Brian

============================

From: Chatty Cathy 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 14:56:16 +0200
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:

> 2.  Nuking potatoes is what I do when I'm going to make
> mashed potatoes.  The nuked potatoes have much more texture
> and flavor than boiled ones!

Really?  I haven't found that, Alan. I prefer to just boil my spuds if I 
am making mash. What I have done is nuke sweet potatoes (whole) and then 
chop them up before chucking them into hot oil to make fries. Those came 
out pretty good.
 
> BTW, I like the skins, and they get mashed along with the
> potato bodies....

I like 'baby' potato skins - but I don't use them for mash. Roast spuds 
in their skins are great tho'.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 10:59:16 -0600
--------
Chatty Cathy wrote:
>Alan Moorman wrote:
>> 2.  Nuking potatoes is what I do when I'm going to make
>> mashed potatoes.  The nuked potatoes have much more texture
>> and flavor than boiled ones!
>
>Really?  I haven't found that, Alan. I prefer to just boil my spuds if I 
>am making mash. 

I use Russets for that, and nuked ones are much preferable
to boiled one, since the boiled ones are so smooth and moist
they make kind of blah mashed potatoes.    However, I'm not
one to mash/whip them to death, either.   I like a little
texture.

>What I have done is nuke sweet potatoes (whole) and then 
>chop them up before chucking them into hot oil to make fries. Those came 
>out pretty good.

And here I am with two sweet potatoes just waiting to be
cooked!

Any good ideas for not-fried ones?

============================

From: Chatty Cathy 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 20:34:34 +0200
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
> And here I am with two sweet potatoes just waiting to be
> cooked!
> 
> Any good ideas for not-fried ones?

Prolly the wrong time of year for you, but they are great cooked in the 
coals on a charcoal grill. You can also roast them in the oven (in foil) 
or mash them, or make pie... ;)

============================

From: modom (palindrome guy) 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 14:41:57 -0600
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
>And here I am with two sweet potatoes just waiting to be
>cooked!
>
>Any good ideas for not-fried ones?

I've had some success with baking sweet potatoes till they're really
done.  Then I mash them with some butter, minced chipotle, orange
juice, and orange zest.  Add a little salt and pepper and bake the
mash till it gets just bubbly hot.

============================

From: Ken Knecht 
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2006 17:46:21 GMT
--------
sandi wrote:
> I poke holes (fairly deep) with a fork on 4 sides and both ends.  
> Then micro 1/2 way flip over and continue 'baking'  Depending on 
> size you can nuke from 3 to 9+ minutes.  My medium sided  potatoes 
> nuke for about 4 to 4 1/2 minutes.  Then let them sit for a few 
> minutes before eating.
 
I tried that last night. I guessed ten minutes for a fairly large russet 
and it seemed about right. To my uneducated palate it tasted enough like 
a baked potato, but I prefer the potato with a thick crisp skin - easier 
to eat. But I guess that goes with the short cooking time. All in all, 
I'll continue to make them in the MW. Thanks.

============================

From: aem 
Date: 30 Dec 2006 10:26:13 -0800
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
>  [snip]  To my uneducated palate it tasted enough like
> a baked potato, but I prefer the potato with a thick crisp skin - easier
> to eat. But I guess that goes with the short cooking time. All in all,
> I'll continue to make them in the MW. Thanks.

In other words you're going to settle for something less than what you
really like.  My New Years Resolution is to go the other way:  I
resolve to reduce the number of shortcuts and compromises and go for
the better results instead.    -aem

============================

From: sandi 
Date: 31 Dec 2006 03:29:51 GMT
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> I tried that last night. I guessed ten minutes for a fairly
> large russet and it seemed about right. To my uneducated
> palate it tasted enough like a baked potato, but I prefer the
> potato with a thick crisp skin - easier to eat. But I guess
> that goes with the short cooking time. All in all, I'll
> continue to make them in the MW. Thanks. 

Glad that seemed to work okay for you.  

Enjoy and Happy New Year!

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2006 06:08:09 -0600
--------
sandi wrote:
> I poke holes (fairly deep) with a fork on 4 sides and both ends.  
> Then micro 1/2 way flip over and continue 'baking'  Depending on 
> size you can nuke from 3 to 9+ minutes.  My medium sided  potatoes 
> nuke for about 4 to 4 1/2 minutes.  Then let them sit for a few 
> minutes before eating.

I think you only need one poke with a fork, from a side all
the way to the center.  It lets the internal steam out.

============================

From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:49:04 GMT
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
>Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave that 
>taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

Nuke them for several minutes, then bake as you normally would.  Works
a treat.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:24:26 -0600
--------
TammyM wrote:
>Nuke them for several minutes, then bake as you normally would.  Works
>a treat.

I figure, if you're going to use all the gas to heat the
oven up at all, you might as well do the potatoes in the
oven, not the microwave!

(I never do them in the oven, any more.)

============================

From: Ian MacLure 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 13:01:36 -0600
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave
> that taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

    	I use a hybrid method.
    	Scrub well.
    	Olive oil.
    	9 minutes on high.
    	Pop into 375 deg oven for 30 minutes.
    	Works every time.

    	IBM

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:18:31 -0600
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
>Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave that 
>taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

Uh oh.

You started THAT thread, again!

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:28:34 -0600
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
> Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave
> that taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

We all know they aren't really "baked" and you know it too, so you can
ignore those criticisms.  I've found, when on the road in a hotel with a
kitchen but only a microwave for an oven, this method works very well (it's
essentially what I'd do if I had a regular oven).  Poke holes along the top
of the potatoes.  Rub them with butter then sprinkle with salt.  Don't wrap
them in anything, just put them on a paper plate.  Nuke 7-10 minutes for 2
large baking potatoes; poke them with a fork at 7 minutes to test for
doneness in the center.  Let them sit a minute, then eat!

============================

From: Karen AKA Kajikit 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2006 22:22:03 -0500
--------
Ken Knecht wrote:
>Anyone have a good method of making 'baked' potatoes in the microwave that 
>taste like potatoes baked in a regular oven?

MWed potatoes taste just fine to me... they're just not as crispy on
the outside as if they're done in the oven. I just rinse the potatos
(one for each of us) and put them on a plate and the nuke them for
eight minutes if they're small and ten minutes if they'e large ones. 


[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]