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Subject: Microwave baked potato?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 09:32:05 -0700
--------
For those of you who are interested, there is a place out there where
you can buy frozen, fully baked potatoes that microwave in 3-4 minutes
and taste like fresh, oven baked potatoes.  Check it out at
www.worldwidefoodsinc.com.  Also find free recipes for baked
potatoes.  These are very convenient.  I have 5 kids, age 6 and under
and I use them at home often as they save me a lot of time in the
kitchen.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 11:36:25 -0500
--------
If you are nuking, you can nuke/bake a fresh potato too. It takes a bit 
longer, but not significantly so and it'll save you a LOT of money!

I used to wrap a spud in waxed paper to nuke but graduated to placing 
them inside of a covered corningware baking dish with a little water.

Works fine.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 10:01:34 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> andreahunte wrote:
> > For those of you who are interested, there is a place out there where
> > you can buy frozen, fully baked potatoes that microwave in 3-4 minutes
> > and taste like fresh, oven baked potatoes.

I doubt that they will taste like just baked... and you can cook a
potato from raw in a microwave oven in 3-4 minutes.  And a person can
bake a bunch of spuds and refrigerate for later.. in fact whenever I
bake potatoes I bake the entire five pound bag, they can easily be
reheated later but I like them cold too, I like to dice them into a
salad.  Cold baked potatoes make a very satisfying and healthful snack
too, and I like them plain, cold it's like eating a piece of fruit.

> If you are nuking, you can nuke/bake a fresh potato too. It takes a bit
> longer, but not significantly so and it'll save you a LOT of money!
>
> I used to wrap a spud in waxed paper to nuke but graduated to placing
> them inside of a covered corningware baking dish with a little water.

But that's steamed.  You cannot bake anything in a microwave oven.

I cook potatoes often in a microwave, but I'd never confuse them with
baked... I wouldn't confuse them with boiled either, boiled potatoes
are far better because they're more evenly cooked.  I'll nuke a couple
of spuds (becaue it's quick and no pot to clean) but have never yet
had one that cooked evenly or any two that cooked to the same degree
of doneness.

I think you need to take a hint and snack on plain cold potatoes
instead of all that salty crap you pig out on.  Potaotes are very low
calorie and high in nutrition... of course if you're gonna blend
potatoes with your ham, olives, anchovie, and tons of mayo then you're
just fucking yourself.  Well, if you can get your tits to swell
instead of your fingers... heheheh

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 04:40:19 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> I cook potatoes often in a microwave, but I'd never confuse them with
> baked... I wouldn't confuse them with boiled either, boiled potatoes
> are far better because they're more evenly cooked.  I'll nuke a couple
> of spuds (becaue it's quick and no pot to clean) but have never yet
> had one that cooked evenly or any two that cooked to the same degree
> of doneness.

I do potatoes in the microwave on occasion.  Daughter is fond of those 
plastic wrapped ones that you just nuke.  I think they leave something to be 
desired.

Mainly when I make baked potatoes, I do them ahead of time, cool and stuff 
them using plain rice milk, olive oil, nutritional yeast and green onions, 
then a sprinkling of Hungarian Sweet Paprika.  Works for me! 

============================

From: Pandora 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 19:01:46 +0200
--------
Omelet ha scritto:
> If you are nuking, you can nuke/bake a fresh potato too. It takes a bit
> longer, but not significantly so and it'll save you a LOT of money!

I don't know Omelet if you save money , because oven 
costs...:DDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:09:41 -0500
--------
Pandora wrote:
> I don't know Omelet if you save money , because oven 
> costs...:DDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Junk food always costs more than electricity. Even here. 

I AM considering building a solar stove/oven tho'.
Heaven knows summer days in Texas are good for that sort of thing!

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 11:18:14 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Junk food always costs more than electricity. Even here. 
>
> I AM considering building a solar stove/oven tho'.
> Heaven knows summer days in Texas are good for that sort of thing!

I totally agree with you on the junk food issue. You end up paying for
it in doctor/dentist bills.  However, you should know that these are
all natural, with no additives.  Therefore, they do not qualify as
"junk food".

============================

From: Pandora 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:00:16 +0200
--------
andreahunter65 ha scritto:
> I totally agree with you on the junk food issue. You end up paying for
> it in doctor/dentist bills.  However, you should know that these are
> all natural, with no additives.  Therefore, they do not qualify as
> "junk food".

Yes! It's true!!!

============================

From: Pandora 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 20:57:29 +0200
--------
Omelet ha scritto:
> Junk food always costs more than electricity. Even here. 
>
> I AM considering building a solar stove/oven tho'.
> Heaven knows summer days in Texas are good for that sort of thing!

Oh yes! I think that potatoes in Texas  can be roasted under the sun :DDDDDD

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 16:50:58 -0500
--------
Pandora wrote:
> Oh yes! I think that potatoes in Texas  can be roasted under the sun :DDDDDD

I probably would not even need the solar collector. 

Hugs!

============================

From: Mitch[at]...
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:12:24 GMT
--------
I nuke 4 potatoes for about 10-12 minutes, then brush with oil and
finish in the oven with whatever's cooking.  They come out just like
they've been baked for an hour.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 12:37:34 -0500
--------
Mitch@... wrote:
> I nuke 4 potatoes for about 10-12 minutes, then brush with oil and
> finish in the oven with whatever's cooking.  They come out just like
> they've been baked for an hour.

Ever try that out on the grill?

I'm interested in trying that.

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 13:18:21 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Ever try that out on the grill?
>
> I'm interested in trying that.

I microwave potatoes and then finish them on the grill.  Just microwave them 
until they're starting to steam a bit and then put them on the grill for 
half an hour or so.  I use charcoal so you might need to adjust the time if 
you use gas.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:16:25 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:
> I microwave potatoes and then finish them on the grill.  Just microwave them 
> until they're starting to steam a bit and then put them on the grill for 
> half an hour or so.  I use charcoal so you might need to adjust the time if 
> you use gas.

I use wood or charcoal. I don't have a gas grill. :-)

Thanks!

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:54:19 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I use wood or charcoal. I don't have a gas grill. :-)

I think I probably microwave two baking potatoes about 3 to 4 minutes and 
then turn them over for another couple of minutes.  The time kind of depends 
on how big the potatoes are.  Since we like our steaks about medium I put 
the potatoes on for a good 20 minutes before I put the steaks on.

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 22:03:21 GMT
--------
Ms P wrote:
> I think I probably microwave two baking potatoes about 3 to
> 4 minutes and then turn them over for another couple of
> minutes.  The time kind of depends on how big the potatoes
> are.  Since we like our steaks about medium I put the
> potatoes on for a good 20 minutes before I put the steaks

I don't think nuked potatoes need turning. 6 minutes would be 
about right for completely cooking two of them and 4 minutes 
followed by 20 minutes in a real oven sounds right. I've never 
tried recooking nuked potatoes except for making stuffed 
potatoes in the regular oven.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 19:09:50 -0400
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> I don't think nuked potatoes need turning. 6 minutes would be about right 
> for completely cooking two of them and 4 minutes followed by 20 minutes in 
> a real oven sounds right. I've never tried recooking nuked potatoes except 
> for making stuffed potatoes in the regular oven.

Since potatoes come in a variety of sizes and types, timing is not able to 
be pinpointed.  Not to mention microwave power from 600 watts to over 1500 
watts.   I've done 4, 5 6, even 8 at times, then put them on the grill. 
Good, but not as good as fully baked in an oven. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 00:47:14 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:
> I think I probably microwave two baking potatoes about 3 to 4 minutes and 
> then turn them over for another couple of minutes.  The time kind of depends 
> on how big the potatoes are.  Since we like our steaks about medium I put 
> the potatoes on for a good 20 minutes before I put the steaks on.

Cool, thanks!

I'd put them on about the same time. Dad likes medium meat while I like 
it rare.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 07:38:35 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> Cool, thanks!

But, but with the grill going there's a better way... a much better
*tastier* way... scrub potatoes and with skin on make about 3/16"
slices, deal like playing cards onto a sheet of heavy foil, with a
slice of onion, a sprig of parsley, s n' p, and a blob of butter...
wrap tightly into a packet and slap on the grill.  You can fit two
baking sized spuds into each packet... be more creative with seasoning
if you like; add a few slivers of garlic a bell pepper ring, oregano,
hot pepper flakes, even grated cheese.... you don't want butter use
olive oil.  Grill on medium heat about ten minutes each side before
starting your meat.  Just before taking off the grill cut a few slits
in the foil to release the moisture.  This was my favorite part of my
many cross country road trip dinners, cooked on my trusty $2 Cheap
Johns grill.  What you put into the spud packet is only limited by
ones imagination... 'shrooms are very good too.  And for the more
adventurous toss in a can of anchovies or kippers.

Sheldon Eyes

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:21:06 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> But, but with the grill going there's a better way... a much better
> *tastier* way... scrub potatoes and with skin on make about 3/16"
> slices, deal like playing cards onto a sheet of heavy foil, with a
> slice of onion, a sprig of parsley, s n' p, and a blob of butter...
> wrap tightly into a packet and slap on the grill.

You've brought up some fond memories here.  My BIL made these once, with 
potatoes out of the ground just a few minutes.  He put a half slice of 
bacon in each packet.  I've never had such good potatoes.

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 16:43:23 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> For those of you who are interested, there is a place out there where
> you can buy frozen, fully baked potatoes that microwave in 3-4 minutes
> and taste like fresh, oven baked potatoes.  Check it out at
> www.worldwidefoodsinc.com.  Also find free recipes for baked
> potatoes.  These are very convenient.  I have 5 kids, age 6 and under
> and I use them at home often as they save me a lot of time in the
> kitchen.

What a pathetic shill / spam post. Nuking a fresh, raw potato take a
couple minutes longer and is more convenient and of course a lot
cheaper.

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 10:02:20 -0700
--------
Pete C.wrote:
> What a pathetic shill / spam post. Nuking a fresh, raw potato take a
> couple minutes longer and is more convenient and of course a lot
> cheaper.

Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.
You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:23:14 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:

> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
> supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.

Shill, plain and simple.

> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. 

Pathetic.

> Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

Anyone who has time to eat said potato has the 30 seconds it takes to
clean said potato before placing in the microwave. I suppose you also go
to those stores that assemble a ready to "cook" meal kit for you while
stroking your ego telling you that your life is too busy and your time
is too valuable to spend the 15 minutes preparing the ingredients, the
very same 15 minutes you spend at that store.

Shill.

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 04:45:29 GMT
--------
Pete C. wrote:
> Anyone who has time to eat said potato has the 30 seconds it takes to
> clean said potato before placing in the microwave. I suppose you also go
> to those stores that assemble a ready to "cook" meal kit for you while
> stroking your ego telling you that your life is too busy and your time
> is too valuable to spend the 15 minutes preparing the ingredients, the
> very same 15 minutes you spend at that store.
>
> Shill.

I just don't understand those places.  There is one near me and I took a 
peek in there after all these people I know were raving about what a good 
thing it was.  Wouldn't work for me since we have food allergies and there 
were cross contamination issues everywhere.  Plus most of the menus they 
have wouldn't go over well with us either.

But I just couldn't see it.  No appeal whatever to me.  Why would I want to 
drive to a place to assemble a meal then bring it home and freeze it?  Not 
for me.

My mom tried to tell me if I didn't have the food allergies and I was 
working, I would love it.  Well, no I would not.  I can't see myself ever 
liking that.  Oddly, I've never seen anyone in there making a meal.  Never. 

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 06:50:40 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I just don't understand those places.  There is one near me and I took a
> peek in there after all these people I know were raving about what a good
> thing it was.  Wouldn't work for me since we have food allergies and there
> were cross contamination issues everywhere.  Plus most of the menus they
> have wouldn't go over well with us either.

Like I said, that store concept like a lot of other similarly stupid
things all work on the principle of extracting money from the clueless
by stroking their egos. Instead of say, teaching the subject how to
cook, you instead tell them that they are too busy (read lazy) and their
time is too valuable (they're self absorbed and neglecting their kids)
for them to spend the huge amount of time (15 minutes) it takes to
prepare ingredients for cooking. It's simply a yuppified TV dinner at a
yuppified price.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 10:23:53 -0700
--------
andreahunte... wrote:
> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
> supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.
> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

You couldn't pay me to eat that garbage, probably so handled it's too
unclean to slop hogs... I don't want your crotch-wipe hands touching
my food.

Got plenty of time, if I'm roasting a hunk of meat for dinner anyway
takes no extra anything to bake a whole mess of potatoes at the same
time.  And I bet your crappy precooked reheated/petrified potatoes are
nowhere near as good as mine... can't beat fresh dug still warm from
my very own sun kissed earth.  And I've never yet lit an oven just for
baked potatoes.. only an imbecile lights an oven just to bake
potatoes, let alone just one or two.

Not out of the ground 24 hours when I ate them, reds boiled (salad),
golds baked... baked a couple heads of that home grown garlic too:
http://i15.tinypic.com/63j2i3p.jpg

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 10:37:21 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Not out of the ground 24 hours when I ate them, reds boiled (salad),
> golds baked... baked a couple heads of that home grown garlic too:
> http://i15.tinypic.com/63j2i3p.jpg

Sheldon,

I absolutely love home grown garden vegetables and your pics look
wonderful.  I'm just saying that if you can't have fresh out of your
garden, (not everyone is as lucky as you), this is the next best
thing.

Andrea

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:33:35 -0500
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> I absolutely love home grown garden vegetables and your pics look
> wonderful.  I'm just saying that if you can't have fresh out of your
> garden, (not everyone is as lucky as you), this is the next best
> thing.

But Andrea, Newbie spammers are not appreciated on ANY usenet groups 
that are not a "for sale" marketing group.

Now if you want to come here and be a regular participant and post a 
link to your sales site in your signature, that is ok.

Nobody has EVER picked on the Kona coffee bean seller from Hawaii as 
they are not a blatant spammer!

We get so inundated with spam all over RL and the 'net, it gets a bit 
tiresome.

When your post is nothing but a shill, few are going to appreciate it 
and worse, you may actually get boycotted.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 20:48:10 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Not out of the ground 24 hours when I ate them, reds boiled (salad),
> golds baked... baked a couple heads of that home grown garlic too:
> http://i15.tinypic.com/63j2i3p.jpg

Sheldon, I love your garden :)

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:26:53 GMT
--------
I've never tried a reheated baked potato but was the original 
cooking conventional or nuking? If conventional, it might be 
interesting to try.

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 10:34:15 -0700
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> I've never tried a reheated baked potato but was the original
> cooking conventional or nuking? If conventional, it might be
> interesting to try.

The original is baked in an oven, cooled with a special, patented
process, and Individually quick frozen, all in a very clean FDA
approved processing plant.  This is what makes it taste better than a
fresh microwave baked potato.

BTW, thank you James, it's nice to know there are some decent people
out there...

Andrea
Idaho

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 11:51:33 -0700
--------
andreahunte...@msn.com wrote:
> is baked in an oven, cooled with a special, patented
> process, and Individually quick frozen,

If it's patented it's protected and not secret so you'd have no
reservations sharing this special cooling process... probably has to
do with a fan and witch's tits! hehe

And frozen yet, blech!

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:13:42 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote in message 
> The original is baked in an oven, cooled with a special, patented
> process, and Individually quick frozen, all in a very clean FDA
> approved processing plant.  This is what makes it taste better than a
> fresh microwave baked potato.

A microwaved potato is not a baked potato, so your "patented process" has 
nothing to do with the taste difference. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:28:17 -0500
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> I've never tried a reheated baked potato but was the original 
> cooking conventional or nuking? If conventional, it might be 
> interesting to try.

I've made extra baked spuds (and yams) on the wood grill or in the oven. 
They are just fine re-heated in the nuker.

But I just don't see the point in purchasing pre-cooked "baked" potatoes.

If I am time challenged (which I am during the week), I cook extra on 
weekends. Both dad and I are perfectly happy to live on nuked leftovers 
for a day or three.

I try not to make leftovers that last more than 3 days as we both tend 
to get bored with them. I'll just go ahead and cook when I get home from 
work on Thursday and Friday mornings... Things like eggs and stuff.

============================

From: George 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 14:09:13 -0400
--------
andreahunter65@msn wrote:
> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
> supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.
> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

You are right. It is an incredibly intense and physical operation and it 
does take a large amount of time to wash a potato. Sometimes I start in 
the afternoon and it is sunset before I am finished washing potatoes.

It makes far more sense to buy frozen potatoes as used in industrial 
national restaurant chains so we can enjoy that same mediocre quality 
and convenience at home.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 19:39:13 +0100
--------
George wrote:
> You are right. It is an incredibly intense and physical operation and
> it does take a large amount of time to wash a potato. Sometimes I
> start in the afternoon and it is sunset before I am finished washing
> potatoes.

LOL

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:14:51 GMT
--------
George wrote:
> You are right. It is an incredibly intense and physical operation and it 
> does take a large amount of time to wash a potato. Sometimes I start in 
> the afternoon and it is sunset before I am finished washing potatoes.

Hopefully, you OK'd this exercise with your doctor and had a stress test 
before beginning. 

============================

From: John Kane 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:37:32 -0700
--------
George wrote:
> You are right. It is an incredibly intense and physical operation and it
> does take a large amount of time to wash a potato. Sometimes I start in
> the afternoon and it is sunset before I am finished washing potatoes.

That toothbrush that came with the Barbie set is too small. Get a
larger one.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:14:22 -0500
--------
andreahunter wrote:
> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
> supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.
> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

Only lazy twerps like you won't scrub a bag of fresh spuds...
If you are rich enough to eat junk food, fine.

But this list never has appreciated SPAM!!!
And it's obvious you are a low life scum spammer.

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:34:38 -0500
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

Because you are so busy doing what?

Bob

============================

From: tert in seattle 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:08:29 +0000 (UTC)
--------
zxcvbob writes:
>Because you are so busy doing what?

she's got five kids under age six

who has time to put on a condom (or wash and properly cook
potatoes) when you're busy having all that sex?

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 16:54:35 -0500
--------
tert in seattle wrote:
> she's got five kids under age six
> 
> who has time to put on a condom (or wash and properly cook
> potatoes) when you're busy having all that sex?

You would go there. ;-)
You are so mean!

OTOH, she could truly benefit from exploring solar cooking.
5 kids have gotta be expensive!

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 14:43:03 -0700
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
> Because you are so busy doing what?

Are you kidding?  Five kids under the age of six?

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:45:20 GMT
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Are you kidding?  Five kids under the age of six?

If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having 
that many kids. 

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:16:01 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having
> that many kids.

With all the IVF (and other technique) induced multiple births these
days, I don't think you have any grounds for that comment.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 06:26:21 GMT
--------
Pete C. wrote:
> With all the IVF (and other technique) induced multiple births these
> days, I don't think you have any grounds for that comment.

Forget biology & medicine, and think about sanity (or lack of it). 

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 06:52:04 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Forget biology & medicine, and think about sanity (or lack of it).

Of course, anyone who wants to have more than two children should
automatically be tossed in the loony bin.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 11:59:20 GMT
--------
Pete C. wrote:
> Of course, anyone who wants to have more than two children should
> automatically be tossed in the loony bin.

It's a safe bet that if you asked most women if they wanted that many kids 
in that length of time, the best situation would be that they'd say "no". 
But, I think most would punch your lights out just for asking. :-) 

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:11:40 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom says...
> It's a safe bet that if you asked most women if they wanted that many kids 
> in that length of time, the best situation would be that they'd say "no". 
> But, I think most would punch your lights out just for asking. :-) 

Some women might punch your lights out for insisting that they are lying 
about their kids and then not apologizing.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 21:49:58 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> Some women might punch your lights out for insisting that they are lying
> about their kids and then not apologizing.

Do you apologize for not believing things sometimes? 

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 13:35:06 GMT
--------
Pete C. wrote:
>Of course, anyone who wants to have more than two children should
>automatically be tossed in the loony bin.

oooh, that really hurts, coming from such a well-adjusted individual
as yourself.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:18:41 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having 
> that many kids. 

It is possible.

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:22:07 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having 
> that many kids. 

Very easy to accomplish if one or two sets of twins.  Well, easy except 
for finding the energy to have sex with a house full of toddlers.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 06:25:28 GMT
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
> Very easy to accomplish if one or two sets of twins.  Well, easy except 
> for finding the energy to have sex with a house full of toddlers.

That, and thinking you can divide your attention between that many kids. Or, 
maybe she's one of those parents who gives no attention to the kids, so any 
number will do. 

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 11:55:11 GMT
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> That, and thinking you can divide your attention between that many kids. Or,
> maybe she's one of those parents who gives no attention to the kids, so any
> number will do.

Simply a superficial collector. Her life is built around possessions as
a substitute for any character, children are simply another possession
to try to show off, just like the micro mansion and yuppmobile.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 08:51:10 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having 
> that many kids. 

How do you figure? I work with one doctor who has 7 kids under the age 
of 6. All his. One set of twins and one set of triplets.
I feel for his wife, lol.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 12:54:04 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> How do you figure? I work with one doctor who has 7 kids under the age of 
> 6. All his. One set of twins and one set of triplets.
> I feel for his wife, lol.

I hadn't considered the multiple-kids-at-once idea, but even so, you've 
gotta be nuts. 

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 09:09:19 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> I hadn't considered the multiple-kids-at-once idea, but even so, you've 
> gotta be nuts. 
 
Or good natured enough to roll with the punches..what's the alternative?

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 13:12:32 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Or good natured enough to roll with the punches..what's the alternative?

I guess my thoughts come from knowing 4 sets of parents who felt 2 or 3 kids 
was plenty (and a handful) in a span of 5 or 6 or 7 years. And then, there's 
the "You're not coming near me with THAT thing (penis) so soon, buddy!" 
factor. :-)

The flip side is that with half a dozen kids, you quickly end up with 
built-in babysitting, sorta kinda. 

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 11:32:40 -0400
--------
kilikini wrote:
> twins and triplets!?!?!?!?!?  How on earth does a person afford diapers?

You can always buy the kind that you wash and se again.  Used to be the ONLY 
way to diaper a baby. 

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:09:40 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom says...
> If they are her biological kids (not adopted), then she's lying about having 
> that many kids. 

Why? Do the math. It's not unusual for a woman to be able to get 
pregnant 3 months after giving birth. It's crazy, to be sure, but 
possible.

Groucho joke from that funny TV show he did for a while. His guest was a 
woman with some huge number of kids.

Groucho: How is it you come to have so many children?

Woman: (Giggle) I really love my husband!

Groucho: (eyebrows levitating) Well, I love my cigar but I take it our 
of my mouth once in a while.

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 15:59:42 -0500
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> Why? Do the math. It's not unusual for a woman to be able to get
> pregnant 3 months after giving birth. It's crazy, to be sure, but
> possible.

It's possible in 1 month.  There are lots of women that end up with kids 10 
months apart in age.  It used to be common for women to have a baby every 
year for several years.  There are still people that do have babies every 
year or so.  It's not at all unusual to see a Mennonite family with 
stairstep kids.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:17:04 -0500
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> Groucho: How is it you come to have so many children?
> 
> Woman: (Giggle) I really love my husband!

She might be Catholic...

============================

From: John Kane 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:38:54 -0700
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
> Because you are so busy doing what?

Err, green potatos?  Are they not sunburnt and a bit carcinogenic?  I
don't buy green ones myself.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 16:48:57 GMT
--------
John Kane wrote:
> Err, green potatos?  Are they not sunburnt and a bit carcinogenic?  I
> don't buy green ones myself.

I just read that the green potato "threat" is overrated, but even so, no 
store should be selling them. 

============================

From: kilikini 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:09:33 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> I just read that the green potato "threat" is overrated, but even so,
> no store should be selling them.

I found this explanation:
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=208

To cut the article to the chase.....

By itself, chlorophyll is not a health concern. It is harmless and
tasteless. In potato tubers, the greening is a sign that there may be an
increase in the presence of glycoalkaloids, especially the substance
solanine. When the potato greens, solanine increases to potentially high
levels. Increased solanine levels are responsible for the bitter taste
resulting from a high solanine concentration in potatoes after being cooked.
Solanine biosynthesis occurs parallel but independent of chlorophyll
biosynthesis; each can occur without the other. Unlike chlorophyll, light is
not needed for solanine formation, but, with light, glycoalkaloid formation
is increased. In potatoes solanine formation is localized near the skin,
usually no deeper than one-eighth of an inch (3 mm). In processed potatoes
such as chips (Figure 2) and fries, little hazard exists since peels are
usually removed. Potato breeding programs release only potato varieties that
are tested to be safe and contain low levels of solanine.
Note: All members of the botanical family Solanaceae - not just potatoes -
produce glycoalkaloid toxins. Two common examples are tomatine from tomato
and nicotine from tobacco. Some members of this family are historically
notorious such as belladonna, now used for treating asthma, and the
nightshades.

Ultra-violet radiation as well as visible rays are contained in many light
sources such as flourescent bulbs and sunlight. Ultra-violet and visible
light in the blue-violet region promotes the formation of glycoalkaloids,
steroid-like compounds, and, for potatoes, most notably solanine. When
potato tubers are exposed to light, the solanine content in the peel may
increase as much as ten times. Toxic levels for people are about
one-hundredth of an ounce for a 200-lb person. This 200-lb person would need
to eat about 20 lb of normal whole potatoes in a day to reach this level.
But, with UV light-exposed whole tubers in which solanine had increased
ten-fold, only two pounds could cause a reaction. Potentially high levels
for a 100-lb and 50-lb person would be 16 and 8 ounces of a fully green
potato, respectively. Removing the green areas, skin and underlying core,
the light-induced solanine is removed. A large baked potato frequently
weighs about one pound (16 ounces), but common sizes in restaurants are six
to 11 ounces. Potatoes containing more than 0.1 percent solanine (.01 oz/10
oz potato) are considered unfit for eating. Cooked potatoes cannot turn
green or produce solanine because cooking destroys the enzyme mechanism
required for its production; however, any chlorophyll and solanine produced
before cooking will remain after cooking (Figure 2). A good guide is "if the
potato tastes bitter, don't eat it."

============================

From: John Kane 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:12:01 -0700
--------
kilikini wrote:
> To cut the article to the chase.....
>
> By itself, chlorophyll is not a health concern. It is harmless and

Thank Kili.
 So the stuff is toxic but if I don't have more than 5-6 baked
potatoes at a meal I'm okay. :)    I hadn't heard about the
bitterness .

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 14:38:18 -0400
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato.

All the shills say that.

At $38 plus shipping for 10 pounds, they are for people with more money than 
brains.  29 a pound versus $4.70 a pound with  shipping.

> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

I can have them washed and in the oven or MW by the time you dig the frozen 
crap out of the freezer.  And I'll be a few bucks ahead.  29 a pound versus 
$4.70 a pound with  shipping.  If you wash a 10 pound bag of potatoes in 5 
minutes, you are saving $44 in minutes or equal to $220 an hour.  I have to 
work over a half a day to earn that so I'm not going to give it up for 
pre-washed spuds.

============================

From: andreahunter65[at]msn.com
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 11:42:27 -0700
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> > Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato.
>
> All the shills say that.

Sorry to all of you who were offended by this post.  Though it is good
to know that there was a place that I could get some honest feedback
from.  Thank you all for your honest opinions.  I will leave you alone
now.  Sorry.

============================

From: Pandora 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:03:27 +0200
--------
andreahunter65 ha scritto:
> Sorry to all of you who were offended by this post.  Though it is good
> to know that there was a place that I could get some honest feedback
> from.  Thank you all for your honest opinions.  I will leave you alone
> now.  Sorry.

So, you don't have to be sorry for your opinion , IMO. Sleep quit

============================

From: Steve Wertz 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 19:10:45 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> Sorry to all of you who were offended by this post.  Though it is good
> to know that there was a place that I could get some honest feedback
> from.  Thank you all for your honest opinions.  I will leave you alone
> now.  Sorry.

Chew 'em up and spit em out.  Ptoooey!

============================

From: Steve Y 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:48:45 +0200
--------
"Thank you all for your honest opinions"

You just came to the wrong place I think. Most people on here, IMHO, 
think Quality first, then Price.  There is a market for what you have to 
offer but it's not here. pre-Baked frozen spuds belong in same category 
as "Aunt Bessie's Frozen Yorkshire Puds" that I am ashamed I have a 
sister that actually uses.

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 04:42:27 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> Nothing shill about telling you guys about a good potato. This company
> supplies national restaurant chains and now their potato is online.
> You are wrong about it being more convenient to use a fresh potato.
> Cheaper maybe but not more convenient. Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

I don't buy the green ones and it doesn't take long to wash them.  But you 
can buy pre-washed ones these days.  Wrapped in plastic and ready to nuke. 

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 23:27:55 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I don't buy the green ones and it doesn't take long to wash them.  But you 
> can buy pre-washed ones these days.  Wrapped in plastic and ready to nuke.

If your store is selling green potatoes, it's time to call the health 
department. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 00:51:40 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> If your store is selling green potatoes, it's time to call the health 
> department. 

True.

Getting the occasional green-ish spud is one reason I mostly refuse to 
purchase them bagged.

I nearly always hand-pick them from the bins.
The one exception was a couple of bags of baby reds I bought recently.

Green ones are rare, but I still look over every one while I'm washing 
them.

I also store them in the dark to prevent any risk of greening.

We don't eat many potatoes here tho'. 1/2 of one of those bags of baby 
reds got left in storage long enough to sprout. ;-) I'm fixin' to pot 
them just for grins.

============================

From: val189 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:19:36 -0700
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
>  Who has time or wants to wash/
> scrub a bag of green potatoes you get from the grocery store?

I do.

 I loathe those foil wrapped things most restaurants serve ya.  If I
want a baked potato, I make this decision around 4 pm, then get 'em
into my toaster oven at 450 for at LEAST an hour and a half.  Love
that crispy inner skin which I don't think any other method can
produce.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 22:00:00 -0400
--------
val189 wrote:
>  I loathe those foil wrapped things most restaurants serve ya.  If I
> want a baked potato, I make this decision around 4 pm, then get 'em
> into my toaster oven at 450 for at LEAST an hour and a half.  Love
> that crispy inner skin which I don't think any other method can
> produce.
 
I hear you! I don't own a toaster oven but do them in the regular oven 
for about 90 min or so too. Nice dry skins, crispy and begging to be 
scooped out of potato then the skins loaded up with butter, salt and 
pepper. No disgusting foil on *my* potatoes, please!

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 00:54:21 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I hear you! I don't own a toaster oven but do them in the regular oven 
> for about 90 min or so too. Nice dry skins, crispy and begging to be 
> scooped out of potato then the skins loaded up with butter, salt and 
> pepper. No disgusting foil on *my* potatoes, please!

We've never wrapped them in foil either (except for yams).
Do you ever use potato spikes to speed cooking?

I've actually started pressure cooking yams since the peel is not edible 
anyway. It's worked really well. 12 to 15 minutes at pressure.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 00:01:15 -0600
--------
Omelet wrote:
>I've actually started pressure cooking yams since the peel is not edible 
>anyway. It's worked really well. 12 to 15 minutes at pressure.

Since when is the peel not edible?  It is so good on them!!!

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 01:36:07 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Since when is the peel not edible?  It is so good on them!!!

Okay, but yam peels have never a-peeled to me. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 00:36:49 -0600
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Okay, but yam peels have never a-peeled to me. 

They are totally wonderful when roasted.  

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 03:04:08 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> They are totally wonderful when roasted.  

I always baked a sweet potato or yam for the babies to munch on in their 
high chairs. It was one of their first feed themselves foods. Sliced 
cold/room temp baked sweet potato was always a favorite of theirs.

============================

From: George 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:15:19 -0400
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> They are totally wonderful when roasted.  

For sure, I roasted yam has a huge amount of natural sweetness and flavor.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 08:35:15 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> For sure, I roasted yam has a huge amount of natural sweetness and flavor.

She was referring to the peels being tasty.

I've never eaten yam skins. I do love potato skins tho'.

============================

From: George 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:12:40 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> We've never wrapped them in foil either (except for yams).

Yams also do much better with no wrapping. I put them on the bottom rack 
and put a small square of foil on the oven floor. Unwrapped roasted yams 
develop a really nice caramelization layer and don't need much more than 
slicing and eating.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 08:34:34 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> Yams also do much better with no wrapping. I put them on the bottom rack 
> and put a small square of foil on the oven floor. Unwrapped roasted yams 
> develop a really nice caramelization layer and don't need much more than 
> slicing and eating.

We wrapped them in foil to contain the mess they tend to make. ;-)

Okay, I'll have to try them then over a wood grill where it does not 
matter...

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 13:35:51 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> We wrapped them in foil to contain the mess they tend to make. ;-)

Based on my experience, the only mess they make goes down, so I put them ON 
foil, but not IN foil. If your are making messes sideways or upward, the 
heat's too high. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 08:54:55 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Based on my experience, the only mess they make goes down, so I put them ON 
> foil, but not IN foil. If your are making messes sideways or upward, the 
> heat's too high. 

They were being roasted with a turkey for Thanksgiving.

I've stopped roasting Yams at this point and have been pressure cooking 
them, but I'm always up for an education.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:03:47 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> They were being roasted with a turkey for Thanksgiving.
>
> I've stopped roasting Yams at this point and have been pressure cooking
> them, but I'm always up for an education.

Just put them on a piece of foil large enough to catch any dripping syrup, 
and bake slowly, maybe at 325. Stick a fork in to know when they're done. 
Like any sugary dish, you'll get burning if you cook too hot. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:08:38 -0500
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Just put them on a piece of foil large enough to catch any dripping syrup, 
> and bake slowly, maybe at 325. Stick a fork in to know when they're done. 
> Like any sugary dish, you'll get burning if you cook too hot. 

I mostly use my table top oven now for roasting.

I'll give that a try, but I won't end up with a crispy skin...

Do you eat the peels on yams?

That was what started this. I've honestly never tried them.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:10:40 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I mostly use my table top oven now for roasting.
>
> I'll give that a try, but I won't end up with a crispy skin...
>
> Do you eat the peels on yams?

Yes. 

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 13:50:07 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> We wrapped them in foil to contain the mess they tend to
> make. ;-)
>
> Okay, I'll have to try them then over a wood grill where it
> does not matter...

Returning to potatoes! I like to make mashed potatoes with 
baking potatoes usually nuked. There is one bonus in that, after 
removing the potato, the skins can be crisped quickly in the 
conventional oven as a bonus!

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 08:55:46 -0500
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> Returning to potatoes! I like to make mashed potatoes with 
> baking potatoes usually nuked. There is one bonus in that, after 
> removing the potato, the skins can be crisped quickly in the 
> conventional oven as a bonus!

I pressure cooked potatoes for mashed.
Easy to peel.

And faster.

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:12:05 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I pressure cooked potatoes for mashed.
> Easy to peel.
>
> And faster.

I don't have a pressure cooker but is it really quicker than a 
microwave? In any case, as I said, I use baking-type potatoes 
and I've never boiled them. Nuked or conventionally baked they 
make very good mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 10:39:56 -0500
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> I don't have a pressure cooker but is it really quicker than a 
> microwave? In any case, as I said, I use baking-type potatoes 
> and I've never boiled them. Nuked or conventionally baked they 
> make very good mashed potatoes.

My Microwave does not do multiple potatoes (or other bulk items) that 
well.

If I were to do, say, 8 baked spuds in the M-wave, I'd have to set it 
for at least 1 hour and it would overheat. I'd have to do them 2 or 3 at 
a time at 20 minutes or so.

I can put 8 to 10 potatoes in the pressure cooker and put about 1" of 
water in it. It will come to pressure in 10 minutes with that, and I can 
set a timer for 15 minutes.

Done to perfection in a total of 25 to 30 minutes.

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 16:59:48 GMT
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I can put 8 to 10 potatoes in the pressure cooker and put
> about 1" of water in it. It will come to pressure in 10
> minutes with that, and I can set a timer for 15 minutes.
>
> Done to perfection in a total of 25 to 30 minutes.

Microwave: 8 potatoes: 24 minutes.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 12:53:18 -0500
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> Microwave: 8 potatoes: 24 minutes.

In YOUR microwave. ;-)

Next time I have to replace one, I'll spend more.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 08:09:09 -0700
--------
Omelet wrote:
> We've never wrapped them in foil either (except for yams).
> Do you ever use potato spikes to speed cooking?
>
> I've actually started pressure cooking yams since the peel is not edible
> anyway. It's worked really well. 12 to 15 minutes at pressure.

WTF!  Baked yams are wonderful, baked till the sugars come oozing
out.. the skin is the BEST part.. now I really wonder about your
diet... you need to shit can that fercocktah pressure processer and
learn how to cook... begin with the very basics, like baked yams.

When  I was a kid growing up in NYC every neighborhood had a "sweet
potato man" (I'm sure they were yams), plodding the streets with his
wood fired oven mounted on a push cart... on a fridgid snowy day there
was nothing better to warm you up than a burning hot gooey baked
yam... to eat we'd bite an end off and squeeze the insides out of the
skin and nibble that steamy hot flesh (was easier to eat and the skin
kept it hot), then finally we'd savor the skin like the candy it was.

Since when is yam/sweet potato skin not edible... WTF is the matter
with you with that pressure processor... you're still eating Gerber
baby food... you never became an adult.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 15:13:38 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> WTF!  Baked yams are wonderful, baked till the sugars come oozing
> out.. the skin is the BEST part.. now I really wonder about your
> diet... you need to shit can that fercocktah pressure processer and
> learn how to cook... begin with the very basics, like baked yams.
>
> When  I was a kid growing up in NYC every neighborhood had a "sweet
> potato man" (I'm sure they were yams).........

Suddenly, I'm having visions of knishes bought on the street when I was a 
kid. Where was Fortunoff's? Was that Brooklyn? My mom would shop, and my dad 
would stuff us with knishes & soakers from the vendors outside. To die for. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 18:41:45 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Suddenly, I'm having visions of knishes bought on the street when I
> was a kid. Where was Fortunoff's? Was that Brooklyn? My mom would
> shop, and my dad would stuff us with knishes & soakers from the
> vendors outside. To die for.

Joe, if my questions bother you then just ignore, but I haven't a clue what 
you just said:(

What are knishes and soakers please? 

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 17:55:54 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> What are knishes and soakers please?

"Soaker" is an affectionate term for hot dogs that have been sitting in hot 
water, probably for too long. They're delicious, although sometimes the 
attraction can be related to extreme hunger, or the surrounding atmosphere.

For knish, I'm too busy to explain. Wikipedia's explanation is fine:
A knish is an Eastern European snack food popular in Jewish communities. A 
knish consists of a filling covered with dough that is either baked or 
fried. Knishes can be purchased from street vendors in urban areas with a 
large Jewish population, sometimes at a hot dog stand.

In the most traditional versions, the filling is made entirely of mashed 
potato, ground meat, sauerkraut, onions, kasha (buckwheat groats) or cheese. 
More modern varieties of fillings feature sweet potatoes, black beans, 
fruit, broccoli, tofu or spinach.

Many cultures have variations on baked or fried dough-covered snacks similar 
to the knish: the Jamaican patty, the Spanish and Latin American empanada or 
Papa rellena and the South Asian samosa and the Bahavian Nakishka.

Knishes may be round or square/rectangular. They may be entirely covered in 
dough or some of the filling may peek out of the top. Sizes range from those 
that can be eaten in a single bite hors d'oeuvre to sandwich-sized knishes 
that can serve as an entire meal.

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 17:57:28 GMT
--------
By the way, it's pronounced with two syllables:  k-nish. Not "nish", unless 
you want to sound like you're from Iowa. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:18:42 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> By the way, it's pronounced with two syllables:  k-nish. Not "nish",
> unless you want to sound like you're from Iowa.

How about if i come from Scotland?   (which I do) :))

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 19:29:17 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> How about if i come from Scotland?   (which I do) :))

Then you say "Pour me a Lagavulin and you're wearing way too many clothes, 
lad".  :-) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:44:18 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Then you say "Pour me a Lagavulin and you're wearing way too many
> clothes, lad".  :-)

hehehe cheeky:)))))) 

============================

From: George 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:11:55 -0400
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> "Soaker" is an affectionate term for hot dogs that have been sitting in hot 
> water, probably for too long. They're delicious, although sometimes the 
> attraction can be related to extreme hunger, or the surrounding atmosphere.

"dirty water dogs" is the popular current expression.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:16:52 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> "Soaker" is an affectionate term for hot dogs that have been sitting
> in hot water, probably for too long. They're delicious, although
> sometimes the attraction can be related to extreme hunger, or the
> surrounding atmosphere.
>
> For knish, I'm too busy to explain.

Thanks:)  I am UK so I doubt if i will come accross them:) 

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 21:05:20 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Thanks:)  I am UK so I doubt if i will come accross them:) 

Then you will be missing treats! There are several flavors of 
knishes which are pastries stuffed with potatoes, meat and often 
both. The information on "soakers" was new to me: you live and 
learn!

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 07:54:26 +0100
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> Then you will be missing treats! There are several flavors of knishes 
> which are pastries stuffed with potatoes, meat and often both. The 
> information on "soakers" was new to me: you live and learn!

So is a knish like a pasty then, James? 

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 10:41:40 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> So is a knish like a pasty then, James?

Sort of, but not sweet. Most often, street vendors sell the kind with potato 
inside, flavored with a little onion black pepper. Delis and restaurants 
will have other varieties, but they're not a sweet pastry. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 16:17:35 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Sort of, but not sweet. Most often, street vendors sell the kind with
> potato inside, flavored with a little onion black pepper. Delis and
> restaurants will have other varieties, but they're not a sweet pastry.

Think of Cornish Pasties?  Do you remember them?

http://www.cornishlight.co.uk/cornish-pasty.htm

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 15:20:28 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Think of Cornish Pasties?  Do you remember them?

Sounds similar. Now I'm hungry! 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 16:28:08 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> Sounds similar. Now I'm hungry!

:)  there is a good recipe above:) 

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 15:40:29 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> :)  there is a good recipe above:)

I'll have one of the large staff of servants make it for me immediately. :) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 17:33:56 +0100
--------
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
> I'll have one of the large staff of servants make it for me immediately. :)

Ooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh get 'im :))))

============================

From: James Silverton 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 12:16:25 GMT
--------
It's so long since I had a pasty that I can't say for sure but 
to my recollection, leaving out matters of flavoring, a knish 
has quite a lot less crust.

============================

From: Robert L Bass 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 17:54:42 GMT
--------
James Silverton wrote:
> It's so long since I had a pasty that I can't say for sure...

Personally, I never wear pasties.  :^)

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 20:14:19 +0100
--------
Robert L Bass wrote:
> Personally, I never wear pasties.  :^)

You wear steak and kidney pies???? 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2007 15:08:27 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> You wear steak and kidney pies???? 



============================

From: Robert L Bass 
Date: Wed, 29 Aug 2007 03:21:54 GMT
--------
> You wear steak and kidney pies????

Yes, on my hips or so it seems.  :^)

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 29 Aug 2007 12:05:12 +0100
--------
Robert L Bass wrote:
> Yes, on my hips or so it seems.  :^)

Hehe IKWYM :))) 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 10:42:07 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:


I was never taught to eat Yam skins.
Mom and dad always tossed them in the compost.

Learning new stuff is one (of many) reasons I belong to a cooking list...

I learn new stuff all the time. ;-)

Next time I cook yams, I'll try the hides.

Okay?

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 09:46:05 -0600
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Next time I cook yams, I'll try the hides.

But don't pressure cook them.  Either roast them in the oven, or on
the grill.  The caramelization that occurs then makes the skins really
wonderful.  You don't get that if you pressure cook them.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 12:51:28 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> But don't pressure cook them.  Either roast them in the oven, or on
> the grill.  The caramelization that occurs then makes the skins really
> wonderful.  You don't get that if you pressure cook them.

Ok. Next time I grill, I promise.

And I'll take pics. ;-)

============================

From: Steve Y 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 19:46:17 +0200
--------
The key point for me here is what do people expect of a baked potato ?

If doesn't have a crunchy skin then it isn't a baked potato for me. My 
other half used to "bake " her spuds in the microwave but has since 
learnt her lesson.

How much more expensive are these than fresh spuds ? I think I 
calculated $50 US for 10lbs , ie $5 /lb or 2.50/lb, seems way OTT

============================

From: Pandora 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 20:07:47 +0200
--------
Steve Y ha scritto:
> The key point for me here is what do people expect of a baked potato ?
>
> If doesn't have a crunchy skin then it isn't a baked potato for me.

PERFECTLY AGREE with you!

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 11:42:20 -0700
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> The key point for me here is what do people expect of a baked potato ?
>
> If doesn't have a crunchy skin then it isn't a baked potato for me. My
> other half used to "bake " her spuds in the microwave but has since
> learnt her lesson.
>
> How much more expensive are these than fresh spuds ? I think I
> calculated $50 US for 10lbs , ie $5 /lb or  2.50/lb, seems way OTT

Just this AM drove into town cause I had banking to do, and got my
mail from my POB, and gased up my guzzler, stopped at the liquor store
for a 2 litre bottle each Crystal Palace vodka n' gin (sqwertz will
orgasm), and walked next door to the local Grand Union; got a 30 can
case of Genessee cream ale, eight 2 liter jugs black cherry soda, 4
bottles quinine, and a 5lb bag of new potatoes, was on sale (if it's a
sale) $2.49... was a mountain high stack right inside the door, looks
like very nice spuds, they're those long ones... will make a lovely
batch of German style potato salad.  I't too hot now to light the oven
for anything.... I don't do baked potatoes during the warm months and
not all that often during winter either, I typically buy the waxy
potatoes as I prefer them roasted... just scrub well, towel dry,
lightly oil, salt and pepper.  Spread em in a big pan and roast until
toasty brown and puffed.... it's 91F and humid, but I just got a
sudden urge for meat loaf, gravy, and roast new potatoes... will have
to wait.  I got left over grilled chick tiddy and squash... got about
a pound of green beans I picked yesterday too, but I think those are
slated for freezing, will be good in a
winter soup.

I ain't gonna pay anyone to roast my potatoes, that's like buying ice
in the winter.

============================

From: George 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 15:23:28 -0400
--------
Steve Y wrote:
> The key point for me here is what do people expect of a baked potato ?
> 
> If doesn't have a crunchy skin then it isn't a baked potato for me. My 
> other half used to "bake " her spuds in the microwave but has since 
> learnt her lesson.

Same here. If it doesn't have a crispy skin and a little nutty flavor it 
simply isn't a baked potato.

You can certainly cook a potato in the microwave and get the same result 
as famous industrial chain food restaurants but it isn't a baked potato.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 16:15:46 -0400
--------
George says...
> Same here. If it doesn't have a crispy skin and a little nutty flavor it 
> simply isn't a baked potato.
> 
> You can certainly cook a potato in the microwave and get the same result 
> as famous industrial chain food restaurants but it isn't a baked potato.

This is the main point - too many people consider any large, whole, 
cooked potato to be "baked" when a microwaved potato is in fact steamed.

Even so, when I have been in a hurry for a real baked potato, I have 
found that a few minutes in the microwave followed by finishing in the 
oven will cut your cooking time in half and give a result that is hard 
to tell from the real thing.

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 20:35:26 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> This is the main point - too many people consider any large, whole,
> cooked potato to be "baked" when a microwaved potato is in fact steamed.

A microwaved potato is no more steamed than a baked one. In both cases
the heat introduced produces some internal steam.

> Even so, when I have been in a hurry for a real baked potato, I have
> found that a few minutes in the microwave followed by finishing in the
> oven will cut your cooking time in half and give a result that is hard
> to tell from the real thing.

That technique certainly works, indeed very often my use of the
microwave it to trim cooking time of an ingredient or two, like nuking
diced green peppers for a couple minutes to sync them with the rest of
the dish they are going in.

============================

From: George 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 18:37:57 -0400
--------
Pete C. wrote:
> A microwaved potato is no more steamed than a baked one. In both cases
> the heat introduced produces some internal steam.

I think there is a difference. If you bake a potato by simply putting it 
on the oven rack the skin will develop crispness and there will be some 
browning and the skin will have a slightly nutty flavor.  If you prepare 
a restaurant style potato as found in "famous chain places" you would 
wrap it in AL foil which retains the moisture and steams the potato. 
There is no browning or change of skin texture. If you microwave a 
potato you get the same result as wrapping in foil likely because the 
quick cooking doesn't liberate the moisture and lack of infrared for 
crisping.

Of course this assumes that you have enough energy and time left after 
washing the potatoes...

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 22:59:31 GMT
--------
George wrote:
> I think there is a difference. If you bake a potato by simply putting it
> on the oven rack the skin will develop crispness and there will be some
> browning and the skin will have a slightly nutty flavor.  If you prepare
> a restaurant style potato as found in "famous chain places" you would
> wrap it in AL foil which retains the moisture and steams the potato.
> There is no browning or change of skin texture. If you microwave a
> potato you get the same result as wrapping in foil likely because the
> quick cooking doesn't liberate the moisture and lack of infrared for
> crisping.

I didn't claim there was no difference between a baked and microwaved
potato. I indicated that both methods generate some internal steam in
the potato. Neither is actually "steamed".

> Of course this assumes that you have enough energy and time left after
> washing the potatoes...

Yea, that extraordinarily difficult step applies in both cases.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 16:53:06 -0500
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> This is the main point - too many people consider any large, whole, 
> cooked potato to be "baked" when a microwaved potato is in fact steamed.
> 
> Even so, when I have been in a hurry for a real baked potato, I have 
> found that a few minutes in the microwave followed by finishing in the 
> oven will cut your cooking time in half and give a result that is hard 
> to tell from the real thing.

I'm wondering what kind of results I'm going to get from a solar oven 
when I finally get around to building one.

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 17:26:16 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I'm wondering what kind of results I'm going to get from a solar oven
> when I finally get around to building one.

Good solar ovens will produce results directly comparable to a
conventional oven as they produce an environment of dry external
non-radient heat. Be aware however, that a good many of the designs
you'll find are not good solar ovens and have undersized collector area
relative to the cooking area and won't generate enough heat for normal
oven type cooking. The small box ovens with reflector "petals" aren't
really adequate for cooking, really only for heating to consumption
temperature, say 160 degrees.

An example of a good solar oven would be a steel oven box, insulated on
5 sides and not the bottom, with a diffuser "pizza stone" type device
inside on the bottom, located at the focal point of a good sized
parabolic collector. Figure a good 6' dia collector for a cubic foot
sized oven. This setup will put sufficiently concentrated energy on the
bottom of the box to heat the oven interior to "normal" oven
temperatures like 350 degrees. With this design you can also interchange
the oven box with a pot holder so you can boil or simmer food. You do
have to periodically re-aim the collector, which is also how you
regulate the temp by aiming a little off to reduce the heat.

============================

From: The Cook 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 14:32:36 -0500
--------
Steve Y wrote:
>The key point for me here is what do people expect of a baked potato ?
>
>If doesn't have a crunchy skin then it isn't a baked potato for me. My 
>other half used to "bake " her spuds in the microwave but has since 
>learnt her lesson.
>
>How much more expensive are these than fresh spuds ? I think I 
>calculated $50 US for 10lbs , ie $5 /lb or 2.50/lb, seems way OTT

Where did you get those prices for potatoes?  At my local grocery
loose baking potatoes are $.89 per pound.  Bagged ones are even
cheaper.

============================

From: Pete C. 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 18:34:55 GMT
--------
The Cook wrote:
> Where did you get those prices for potatoes?  At my local grocery
> loose baking potatoes are $.89 per pound.  Bagged ones are even
> cheaper.

I believe he is referencing the price for the shilled industrial
potatoes.

============================

From: George 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 13:58:54 -0400
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
> For those of you who are interested, there is a place out there where
> you can buy frozen, fully baked potatoes that microwave in 3-4 minutes
> and taste like fresh, oven baked potatoes.  Check it out at
> www.worldwide-spam-inc.com.  Also find free recipes for baked
> potatoes.  These are very convenient.  I have 5 kids, age 6 and under
> and I use them at home often as they save me a lot of time in the
> kitchen.
 
I bet these are great with onion soup mix and spam.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 14:28:11 -0400
--------
George wrote:
> I bet these are great with onion soup mix and spam.

What is funny, they actually show the potatoes and Spam in a recipe on the 
web page. 

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom 
Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:11:36 GMT
--------
andreahunter65 wrote:
>  These are very convenient.  I have 5 kids, age 6 and under
> and I use them at home often as they save me a lot of time in the
> kitchen.

Let's see: Wash the potato, poke it with a fork a few times, stick it in the 
oven. That takes about 60 seconds. Baking takes 45 minutes at 400 degrees, 
during which time you can be doing whatever you want.

Are you the poster girl for laziness? 

============================

From: val189 
Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2007 16:32:42 -0700
--------
andreahunte...@msn.com wrote:
>I have 5 kids, age 6 and under

She couldn't get outta BED;
 that's HER problem, not spud scrubbin'.


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