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Subject: Who doesn't like (or care for but will eat) potatoes?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 02:09:24 -0600
--------
And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
why?  (This all started in that darned rfc chat channel, in case you care.)

I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
biting into a raw one).

============================

From: serene 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 00:11:48 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:

>And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
>why?  (This all started in that darned rfc chat channel, in case you care.)

Wow, you're fast!  That discussion started mere minutes ago.

>I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
>any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
>boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
>biting into a raw one).

I love them boiled or roasted, and I like potato chips.  French fries
are okay. I can tolerate mashed, but don't really like them.

Oh, and potatoes au gratin are a perfect way to get more fat into my
system, and how can that be a bad thing?

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 02:22:19 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just
> about any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries,
> roasted, boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't
> like (except for biting into a raw one).

I totally forgot scalloped potatoes and potatoes au gratin and potatoes
Dauphenaisse (sp) and potatoes O'Brien and hashed brown potatoes and home
fries...

============================

From: Impraetor 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 00:14:14 -0600
--------
MMMMM   A hot plate of Fries smothered in brown gravy  with a lot of  black
pepper and  some ketchup!    Now THAT is is the way to eat potatos!

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 21:12:59 -0800
--------
Impraetor wrote:
>MMMMM   A hot plate of Fries smothered in brown gravy  with a lot of  black
>pepper and  some ketchup!    Now THAT is is the way to eat potatos!

Years--and years--ago, the only (afaik) Kentucky Fried Chicken store
in Seattle offered French fries with a side of gravy.  Deelish!  I may
have to hit one of the local KFCs for gravy and then go get some fries
at another fast food place...

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 31 Dec 2005 07:01:47 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Denny Wheeler? 
> Years--and years--ago, the only (afaik) Kentucky Fried Chicken store
> in Seattle offered French fries with a side of gravy.  Deelish!  I may
> have to hit one of the local KFCs for gravy and then go get some fries
> at another fast food place...

I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in 
gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy 
on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 03:14:16 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in 
>gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy 
>on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

Oh, these weren't--and if I do it, won't be--covered in gravy.  Dipped
in it on the way to me mouth.  Stay crisp that way. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 31 Dec 2005 16:37:39 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Denny Wheeler? 
> Oh, these weren't--and if I do it, won't be--covered in gravy.  Dipped
> in it on the way to me mouth.  Stay crisp that way. 

Oh, that I could see.  Might even try it.  However, it's not uncommon to 
see them served covered in gravy.  That I can't see. 

============================

From: Jude 
Date: 31 Dec 2005 10:11:02 -0800
--------
But Wayne....out in AZ, I bet they eat Chili Cheese Fries like they do
in NM, smothered with green chile and topped with cheddar. Those don't
keep their crunch, but I don't mind!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 03:36:55 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Jude?
> But Wayne....out in AZ, I bet they eat Chili Cheese Fries like they do
> in NM, smothered with green chile and topped with cheddar. Those don't
> keep their crunch, but I don't mind!

Yes, they do eat those here in AZ.  I can hardly bear to watch it.    If 
I'm going to have French fries, then I'm going to have them crisp.

============================

From: biig 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 11:03:50 -0500
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:
> Oh, these weren't--and if I do it, won't be--covered in gravy.  Dipped
> in it on the way to me mouth.  Stay crisp that way.

  I love fries and gravy.  This summer I tried poutine for the first
time...yummm.....Sharon

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:41:17 -0500
--------
biig wrote:
>  I love fries and gravy.  This summer I tried poutine for the first
>time...yummm.....Sharon

YUUUUUUUUUUCKKKKKKK!

============================

From: tsr3 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 11:44:31 -0800
--------
Hey--Fries and gravy go great together.  Do not knock it till you've
tried it.

One of my favorite meals--open faced hot turkey sandwich with french
fries, all smothered with turkey gravy.

Yum!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!--r3

============================

From: Dave Smith 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 14:49:56 -0500
--------
tsr3 wrote:

> Hey--Fries and gravy go great together.  Do not knock it till you've
> tried it.

They are a natural combination. It's not at all good for you, but it is
delicious.

> One of my favorite meals--open faced hot turkey sandwich with french
> fries, all smothered with turkey gravy.

I would prefer it with chicken or roast beef.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 22:39:21 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it tsr3?
> Hey--Fries and gravy go great together.  Do not knock it till you've
> tried it.
> 
> One of my favorite meals--open faced hot turkey sandwich with french
> fries, all smothered with turkey gravy.
> 
> Yum!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!--r3

LOL!  Okay, now you've done it!  Turkey is one of my pet hate foods.  You 
have just designed the perfect hate meal for me! 

============================

From: serene 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 13:41:03 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>LOL!  Okay, now you've done it!  Turkey is one of my pet hate foods.  You 
>have just designed the perfect hate meal for me! 

I'm with you!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 22:48:55 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it serene?
> I'm with you!

I think we are in a rare minority, Serene.  The US is turkey crazy.  I 
can't think why.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 14:59:50 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>  I think we are in a rare minority, Serene.  The US is turkey crazy.  I 
>  can't think why.

My husband can't stand it.  He tolerates it for Thanksgiving because
that's when I put my foot down and insist on it.  Otherwise, I'm
ambivilant about the subject.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 18:05:11 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> My husband can't stand it.  He tolerates it for Thanksgiving because
> that's when I put my foot down and insist on it.  Otherwise, I'm
> ambivilant about the subject.

When it comes to turkey, opposites must attract.  DH insists on turkey. I 
cannot wait until it is finished and all of it comes out of the refrigerator 
and freezer.  Pressed turkey and turkey breasts IMO do not taste like the 
real thing and I seem to always get sick on turkey, not chicken.  Can't 
figure that one out.
Dee Dee 

============================

From: tsr3 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 15:31:30 -0800
--------
Turkey is proof God exists, and wants us all to be happy. --r3

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 00:37:18 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it tsr3?
> Turkey is proof God exists, and wants us all to be happy. --r3

He apparently does not want *all* of us to be happy!

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:32:10 -0800
--------
tsr3 wrote:
>Turkey is proof God exists, and wants us all to be happy. --r3

I rather thought that was said of beer.

and of course, 'malt does more than Milton can, to justify God's ways
to man.'

============================

From: tsr3 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 22:10:23 -0800
--------
Yes, it was said of beer, but it applies to turkey too!

============================

From: tsr3 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 15:30:41 -0800
--------
Hey Wayne--add to it the cranberry sauce that slides out of the
can--and canned asparagus.....lol.....Can't get any better than that!!
:) --r3

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 00:36:44 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it tsr3?
> Hey Wayne--add to it the cranberry sauce that slides out of the
> can--and canned asparagus.....lol.....Can't get any better than that!!

LOL!  The cranberry jelly is the only thing I could get down.  Canned 
asparagus?  Eeww!

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 16:45:12 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>  LOL!  The cranberry jelly is the only thing I could get down.  Canned 
>  asparagus?  Eeww!

I absolutely love cranberry jelly.... and am the only one in this
house that does, so that means I get to eat the entire thing all by
myself.   Mmmmm!  I haven't met a cranberry I didn't like yet.

:)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 02:07:46 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?
> I absolutely love cranberry jelly.... and am the only one in this
> house that does, so that means I get to eat the entire thing all by
> myself.   Mmmmm!  I haven't met a cranberry I didn't like yet.

I'll eat just about any type of cranberry sauce, but I prefer whole berry
over jelly, and homemade over canned.  They're all good. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 02 Jan 2006 13:09:25 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> LOL!  The cranberry jelly is the only thing I could get down.  Canned
> asparagus?  Eeww!

I never saw the attraction of asparagus at all 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 14:55:14 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ophelia?
> I never saw the attraction of asparagus at all 

You don't like fresh asparagus, either?

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 02 Jan 2006 14:39:32 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> You don't like fresh asparagus, either?

No.  I often wonder if likes and dislikes are mainly because of what we
were used to as we grew up.  I never tasted asparagus until I was well
out of my teenage years. For example I never had spicy foods as a child.
I hate anything spicey or hot and I just can't get used to the sensation
however much I try.   I know that my tastes changed as I got older and
there are many things I like now that I didn't, but some things might be
fixed?  I am probably talking a load of old twaddle but I often think
about it when I see some of the recipes here and I know I couldn't eat
them:)  My grandson however can eat very spicy foods, because my
daughter has given them to him from a very early age.

Oh dear.. did that turn into a wee rant:)))

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Mon, 2 Jan 2006 10:18:24 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Oh dear.. did that turn into a wee rant:)))

Even big rants, as far as I can tell, are tolerated (sometimes encouraged?) 
on this ng. :)))

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 2 Jan 2006 18:37:58 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ophelia?
> Oh dear.. did that turn into a wee rant:)))
 
No, not a rant.  I do understand.  There are a select few things that I 
will not or cannot eat.  Most notably are oysters in any form, assorted 
other sea "creatures", raw fish, kidneys, and probably a few other things 
if I really thought long and had about it.

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 08:15:13 -0400
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in
> gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy
> on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

AMEN to that!!  I even want the ketchup on the side so nothing gets soggy. 
That's why the sight of poutine makes me want to hurl -- oh, actually it 
looks like someone already did.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 03:38:12 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Gabby?
> AMEN to that!!  I even want the ketchup on the side so nothing gets soggy. 
> That's why the sight of poutine makes me want to hurl -- oh, actually it 
> looks like someone already did.

Yes, even the ketchup on the side.  I've never actually seen poutine.  I 
don't think I want to. 

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 21:36:46 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Yes, even the ketchup on the side.

Everything on the side.  Except the garlic.

We had plans for the snacks we were making tonight for New Year's Eve.  
I turn around, and my younger son is making stuffed mushrooms.  That 
wasn't on the list.  Time for a new list!  They were delicious.  They 
had a *lot* of garlic in them.

My daughter is mad.  They smelled so good.  She loves garlic.  She hates 
mushrooms.  So my son makes garlic fries.  These are french fries with 
sauteed garlic sprinkled on top.  They have a *lot* of garlic.  They 
aren't on the list either.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 06:42:24 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dan Abel?
> We had plans for the snacks we were making tonight for New Year's Eve.  
> I turn around, and my younger son is making stuffed mushrooms.  That 
> wasn't on the list.  Time for a new list!  They were delicious.  They 
> had a *lot* of garlic in them.
> 
> My daughter is mad.  They smelled so good.  She loves garlic.  She hates
> mushrooms.  So my son makes garlic fries.  These are french fries with 
> sauteed garlic sprinkled on top.  They have a *lot* of garlic.  They 
> aren't on the list either.

That sounds delicious!  Both the mushrooms and the fries.

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:42:07 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright  wrote:
>Yes, even the ketchup on the side.  I've never actually seen poutine.  I 
>don't think I want to. 

Exactly.

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:41:17 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in 
>gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy 
>on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

Not if the fries are cooked right.

============================

From: LewZephyr 
Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 20:37:56 GMT
--------
I needed a babel fish to understand Wayne Boatwright:
>I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in 
>gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy 
>on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

covered in Chili and Cheese is nice....  I much prefer tater tots that
way... but yumpin yiminy the fries are good that way.

at a standard fare at the typical fast food I like em with mustard and
catsup.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 5 Jan 2006 21:47:24 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it LewZephyr?
> covered in Chili and Cheese is nice....  I much prefer tater tots that
> way... but yumpin yiminy the fries are good that way.
> 
> at a standard fare at the typical fast food I like em with mustard and
> catsup.

IMHO, French fried served any way but crisp is disgusting, although I don't 
mind dipping them in catsup, ranch dressing, etc., as I eat them.

============================

From: ~patches~ 
Date: Fri, 06 Jan 2006 14:45:49 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I will never understand the logic of a plate of French fries covered in 
> gravy.  French fries were meant to be crisp on the outside and almost creamy 
> on the inside.  Covered in gravy, it's just a gloppy wet mess.  Erp!

I'm not a huge French fry fan anytime *however* french fries with gravy 
and cheese aka poutine - wonderful - I indulge once or twice a year; 
french fries with spicey chili, onions, and cheese - heavenly - I 
indulge a couple times a year; french fries with coney sauce (really 
nice recipe) I make a couple times a year as well.  We really don't eat 
a lot of french fries.  And for the Americans here, we like our fries 
with vinegar or a mayo/mustard sauce not ketchup if not using one of the 
above methods.  I make french fries so infrequently, I cut them up using 
a french fry cutter and deep fry them at home.

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:41:16 -0500
--------
Impraetor wrote:
>MMMMM   A hot plate of Fries smothered in brown gravy  with a lot of  black
>pepper and  some ketchup!    Now THAT is is the way to eat potatos!

Ketchup on fries with gravy? ? ? !? ?? ?  Pass. Gravy great! Gravy & ketchup, I
don't think so.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 02:23:42 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:

> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I love potatoes, but have to take half a bottle of Gas-X to deal with
the after-effects.  (Note to self:  buy Beano)

> I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
> any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
> boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
> biting into a raw one).

I'm not fond of most fries (the ones at our local Applebee's are
incredible), and American potato chips have to be kettle fried, or
what's the point?  You missed tater tots!

                      * Exported from MasterCook *

                   Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

Recipe By     :Damsel
Serving Size  : 8     Preparation Time :0:45
Categories    : Easter                          potatoes
                side dishes

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  1 1/2         pounds  russet potatoes -- peeled and cubed
  3             cloves  garlic -- peeled
  2        tablespoons  unsalted butter
  2             ounces  prosciutto -- thinly sliced, finely chopped
     1/4      teaspoon  dried thyme
     1/2           cup  milk -- or more if needed
     1/2           cup  parmesan cheese -- freshly grated
                        freshly ground black pepper -- to taste
  2        tablespoons  parmesan cheese -- for garnish

1.  Cook potatoes and garlic in large pot of boiling water until
potatoes are very tender, about 15 minutes. Drain; return potatoes and
garlic to same pot.

2.  Meanwhile, melt  butter in heavy small saucepan over medium heat.
Add chopped prosciutto and thyme and sauté until fragrant, about 2
minutes.

3.  Add prosciutto mixture and 3/4 cup milk to potatoes and garlic.
Mash well, adding more milk by tablespoonfuls if potatoes are dry. Mix
in 1/2 cup cheese. Season with pepper. (Can be prepared 6 hours ahead.
Cover and chill. Stir over low heat to rewarm, adding more milk by
tablespoonfuls, if desired.) Transfer potatoes to bowl. Sprinkle
lightly with  2 tablespoons cheese; serve. 

Cuisine:
  "Italian"
Source:
  "Adapted from Bon Appétit"
Yield:
  "4 cups"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 146 Calories; 6g Fat (36.1%
calories from fat); 7g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber;
20mg Cholesterol; 321mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean
Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat.                     

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 02:37:13 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> I'm not fond of most fries (the ones at our local Applebee's are
> incredible), and American potato chips have to be kettle fried, or
> what's the point?  You missed tater tots!

Darnit, I did miss tater tots!  I love those things!!

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 00:59:50 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Darnit, I did miss tater tots!  I love those things!!

There has been a long thread on egullet about tater tots...

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=54585&hl=

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 06:16:01 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> There has been a long thread on egullet about tater tots...

Tater tots are one of those things I didn't have until later
in life.  Tried them because of rfc, somehow they came up
and I wound up buying them just to see.

Could live a long time without tater tots, I didn't like them
very much.  Same with the hash browns I have tried, I'd
seriously prefer to make my own, and by hash browns I mean
the potato pancake type.

For the most part I love potatoes.  Hard to think anyone couldn't
find some way to like them.

============================

From: serene 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:44:00 -0800
--------
Nancy Young wrote:

>Could live a long time without tater tots, I didn't like them
>very much.  

I only like the ones with onions in them.

>Same with the hash browns I have tried, I'd
>seriously prefer to make my own, and by hash browns I mean
>the potato pancake type.

Ohmigosh, how could I forget latkes? Probably my favorite way to eat
potatoes.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 21:57:11 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> For the most part I love potatoes.  Hard to think anyone couldn't
> find some way to like them.

I keep potatoes around all the time, mostly red potatoes which I'll roast 
with plenty of olive oil and a few herbs.  I roast enough to pan fry for 
breakfast the next day.
I grew up with potatoes, but gradually over the years, rice is my preference 
for a starch on the plate.
Dee Dee 

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 22:14:20 -0500
--------
Dee Randall wrote
> I grew up with potatoes, but gradually over the years, rice is my 
> preference for a starch on the plate.

Funny, it's sorta the opposite with me ... we had potatoes, that's for
sure, but *man* did we have rice.  Rice Rice Rice.  When I left home
it was a long time I didn't have rice.  I like it now, don't make it as
often as I should, I don't think of it.

I still like it with butter and salt, like a little kid.  Baby food.
(smile)

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 04:08:34 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Funny, it's sorta the opposite with me ... we had potatoes, that's for
> sure, but *man* did we have rice.  Rice Rice Rice.  When I left home
> it was a long time I didn't have rice.  I like it now, don't make it as
> often as I should, I don't think of it.
> 
> I still like it with butter and salt, like a little kid.  Baby food.

Did you ever have it with milk and sugar? I remember my mum heating up 
leftover boiled rice, and putting milk and sugar on it to have for 
breakfast. Tasted good - haven't had it in years, though.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 23:31:41 -0500
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> Did you ever have it with milk and sugar? I remember my mum heating up
> leftover boiled rice, and putting milk and sugar on it to have for
> breakfast. Tasted good - haven't had it in years, though.

Only perhaps as rice pudding?, that's what it sounds like to me.
We never had that at home, I don't remember where I would
have had that.

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 11:17:44 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Only perhaps as rice pudding?, that's what it sounds like to me.
> We never had that at home, I don't remember where I would
> have had that.

Haven't had rice pudding for a long time, either. We used to have creamed 
rice,and sometimes baked rice custard. This wasn't really like that, 
though. It was hot rice, and you sprinkled sugar on it and poured cold milk 
on it - like you would with breakfast cereal. Maybe I'll have to make extra 
next time I cook rice so I can have that for breakfast the next day.

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 07:29:58 -0400
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> Haven't had rice pudding for a long time, either. We used to have creamed
> rice,and sometimes baked rice custard. This wasn't really like that,
> though. It was hot rice, and you sprinkled sugar on it and poured cold milk
> on it - like you would with breakfast cereal. Maybe I'll have to make extra
> next time I cook rice so I can have that for breakfast the next day.

My mom used to make a "rice pudding" dessert that in no way resembles what 
I've since come to know as rice pudding.  Cold cooked short grain rice would 
be folded into sweetened whipped cream and served topped with maple sugar.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 07:21:29 -0600
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Only perhaps as rice pudding?, that's what it sounds like to me.
> We never had that at home, I don't remember where I would
> have had that.

Hey, who turned this into a rice thread?!  LOL

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 08:27:14 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Hey, who turned this into a rice thread?!  LOL

Dee did it!!!

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 11:37:01 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Dee did it!!!

Yep, I was hoping for that.
LOL.
Dee Dee 

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 14:20:24 -0500
--------
Dee Randall wrote:
> Yep, I was hoping for that.

See how fast I turned on you!?

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 14:32:19 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> See how fast I turned on you!?

I know you would never do that, Nancy.
But now,  I will 'watch my step'!
Dee Dee 

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 17:46:32 -0600
--------
Dee Randall wrote:
> I know you would never do that, Nancy.
> But now,  I will 'watch my step'!

Niagra Falls...
Slowly I turned... step by step, inch by inch...

LOL

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 21:14:18 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Niagra Falls...
>Slowly I turned... step by step, inch by inch...

ROTFLOL!!!!
(been a long time since I saw/heard that routine)

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 04:35:38 -0600
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:
> ROTFLOL!!!!
> (been a long time since I saw/heard that routine)

It's been a long time since someone recognized that routine!  LOL

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 03:51:59 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>It's been a long time since someone recognized that routine!  LOL

IIRC, I last saw it in a Three Stooges short.   Though it coulda been
Bud & Lou.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 10:10:22 -0500
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:
> IIRC, I last saw it in a Three Stooges short.   Though it coulda been
> Bud & Lou.

I think the skit Niagara Falls was on the Jail episode on the Abbott & 
Costello TV series.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 10:16:33 -0500
--------
Dee Randall wrote:
> I think the skit Niagara Falls was on the Jail episode on the Abbott & 
> Costello TV series.

We just went through that sometime last year (feels funny to say that).

http://www.niagarafallsreporter.com/slowly.html

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 10:46:31 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> We just went through that sometime last year (feels funny to say that).
>
> http://www.niagarafallsreporter.com/slowly.html

Yes, that was a looooooong time ago.  Forever gone, but not forgotten.
Dee Dee 

============================

From: Dave Smith 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:04:07 -0500
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:
> IIRC, I last saw it in a Three Stooges short.   Though it coulda been
> Bud & Lou.

It was done by both.

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:30:13 -0800
--------
Dave Smith wrote:
>It was done by both.

Yabbut, I don't recall which I last saw.  (doing well to recall that
I'd seen it done by both...)

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 03:06:42 -0800
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
>Did you ever have it with milk and sugar? I remember my mum heating up 
>leftover boiled rice, and putting milk and sugar on it to have for 
>breakfast. Tasted good - haven't had it in years, though.

I used to eat that.  Was indeed good.

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 19:39:40 -0800
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> For the most part I love potatoes.  Hard to think anyone couldn't
> find some way to like them.

I love potatoes, as does my brother.  It's hard for him, though, because 
all of his relatives (and most of his friends) where he lives are 
Chinese.  They didn't grow up with them, and don't like them, in any 
way, shape or form.  He and I like beef.  They don't eat that either.

On the other hand, they eat things that I never would.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 22:51:38 -0500
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> I love potatoes, as does my brother.  It's hard for him, though, because
> all of his relatives (and most of his friends) where he lives are
> Chinese.  They didn't grow up with them, and don't like them, in any
> way, shape or form.  He and I like beef.  They don't eat that either.
>
> On the other hand, they eat things that I never would.

(laugh!)  I can pretty much guarantee I'd live on potatoes rather than
whatever it is you're thinking of.  No offense meant to anyone, I just
won't eat some things that other cultures might think nothing of.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 01:00:57 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Darnit, I did miss tater tots!  I love those things!!

Speaking of tater tots, do you think they would be good dipped in
aoili?

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 04:36:28 -0600
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Speaking of tater tots, do you think they would be good dipped in
> aoili?

Tater tots are best cooked on top of the stove in a frypan in a little
oil. That makes them extra chrunchy on the outside. And their best use
is as a bed for over easy fried eggs. Stab the eggs and allow the yolk
to drip down onto the tots...heaven, just heaven.

Curse you-low carb diet!

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 03:02:59 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>                       * Exported from MasterCook *
>
>                    Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

You know, you could use some of that twirled ham instead of proscuitto.  I
don't think I've ever seen proscuitto down this far south.  Bet they would
be equally good with your ham.

============================

From: SallyW 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 15:24:23 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> You know, you could use some of that twirled ham instead of
> proscuitto.  I don't think I've ever seen proscuitto down this far
> south.  Bet they would be equally good with your ham.

Jill, Seesel's used to carry it in the deli, so you might try (groan) 
Schnuck's. I haven't checked Fresh Market, either, but that might be a 
possibility.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 15:49:56 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> You know, you could use some of that twirled ham instead of proscuitto.  I
> don't think I've ever seen proscuitto down this far south.  Bet they would
> be equally good with your ham.

Oooooooooooooh!  You're an evil genius.  Guess what we're having for
dinner?  

Carol

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:23:17 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Oooooooooooooh!  You're an evil genius.  Guess what we're having for
> dinner?

Happy to oblige :)  I have recently discovered after years of being just
so-so about ham, I like it again.  So I have put on my thinking cap about
what to do with leftover ham for when I buy one again.

============================

From: kilikini 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 12:00:50 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> I'm not fond of most fries (the ones at our local Applebee's are
> incredible), and American potato chips have to be kettle fried, or
> what's the point?  You missed tater tots!

And you missed hash browns!  :~)

============================

From: stacia[at]xmission.com (Glitter Ninja)
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:39:02 +0000 (UTC)
--------
Damsel in dis Dress writes:

>I'm not fond of most fries (the ones at our local Applebee's are
>incredible), and American potato chips have to be kettle fried, or
>what's the point?  You missed tater tots!

  I love tater tots!  How else am I going to get my daily allowance of 
lard, if I don't eat tater tots?

>                   Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

  Kids, these are great.  Seriously.  Go make some now.  Run, don't 
walk!

============================

From: Kathy[at]homein.nz (Kathy in NZ)
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 08:59:39 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
>why?

I will eat them chipped
I will eat them roasted
I will eat them as salad
I've not tried them toasted

But don't feed me them mashed 
or boiled or smashed. 
I can't take them whole baked 
or dried, or flaked.

You can keep your tatties
and you can have mine
I've never met one
that I've thought was divine

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:23:47 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like? And
> why?

I have to agree, never met a potato recipe i did not like. Combining
potatoes with blue cheese is a favourite.

Gratine de pommes de Terre a la Dauphinoise
------------------------------------------------------

Thinly slice 2 & 1/4 lb. potatoes.  Place in a basin, season with salt
and pepper, and grated nutmeg an d add 1 beaten egg, 3 & 1/4 cup boiling
milk and 4 & 1/2 ounces crumbled blue cheese.

Mix well together then fill into well buttered baking dish which has
been rubbed with garlic.  Sprinkle the surface liberally with more blue
cheese and butter and cook in a moderate over for 40 - 45 minutes.
-----------

Or simply make some garlic mashed potatoes and fold in a generous
quantity of blue cheese.

============================

From: rox formerly rmg 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:35:35 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

Over the years my fondness for baked potatoes has been supplanted by a
fondness for steamed yellow fins with a drizzle of EVO and lots of salt.
I hardly ever buy potatoes though so I guess I can take them or leave them.
If someone else prepares them ie french fries or a side dish in a
restaurant, I usually enjoy them.

============================

From: kilikini 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 12:04:22 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I'll pretty much eat them in any way, shape or form as well.  Baked,
roasted, fried, hashed, boiled, scalloped, au gratin........  I just don't
get them enough in this house with a hubby who CLAIMS to be low-carb, but
isn't.  He bought bagels and a loaf of bread just yesterday.  Sheesh!  He's
quickly becoming The Fat Man again.  :~)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 29 Dec 2005 13:13:15 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it jmcquown?
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I love potatoes, every variety grown that I've tried.  I detest canned 
potatoes, think they're an abomination.  Instant mashed potatoes aren't far 
behind, but I will eat them in a pinch.  I keep a box of instant mashed on 
hand for it's thickening qualities.  I like potatoes prepared any way at all 
except hashed browns, although I love home fries.

============================

From: Margaret Suran 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 08:21:33 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I love potatoes, every variety grown that I've tried.  I detest
> canned potatoes, think they're an abomination.  Instant mashed
> potatoes aren't far behind, but I will eat them in a pinch.  I keep
> a box of instant mashed on hand for it's thickening qualities.  I
> like potatoes prepared any way at all except hashed browns,
> although I love home fries.

Wayne, you must be kidding, right?

I love potatoes.  I can eat plain boiled ones with a drop of butter as
dinner, if I only cook for myself.  With buttermilk, if I happen to 
have some in the refrigerator.  And cottage cheese.  :o)

I do not use canned potatoes, instant potatoes or frozen ones, except
for.....Hashed Browns.  I use the Cavendish Brand ones, very
sparingly, because they contain too much fat and salt, but they are
really good, at least to my taste.

As for canned ones, for years I attended an annual dinner at our
synagogue, always sold out and the main course was always the same:
Roasted Chicken (catered, I presume), frozen or canned vegetables and
the most wonderful potatoes, tiny ones, canned by a restaurant supply
house and the sisterhood members in charge of the meal would coat them
lightly with a mixture of flour and spices, drizzle oil over them and
bake them until golden brown.  During the meal, these ladies would
keep baking these potatoes, as many guest would ask for seconds.  I
never tried to duplicate them at home.

I wonder whether they still serve that dinner there.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 29 Dec 2005 16:00:37 +0100
--------
Margaret Suran wrote:

> I love potatoes.  I can eat plain boiled ones with a drop of butter as
> dinner, if I only cook for myself.  With buttermilk, if I happen to 
> have some in the refrigerator.  And cottage cheese.  :o)

I love mashed potatoes made with buttermilk!
 
> I do not use canned potatoes, instant potatoes or frozen ones, except
> for.....Hashed Browns.  I use the Cavendish Brand ones, very
> sparingly, because they contain too much fat and salt, but they are
> really good, at least to my taste.

I can't stand the texture of hashed browns.  The only way I like shredded 
potaotes is in Latkes.
 
> As for canned ones, for years I attended an annual dinner at our
> synagogue, always sold out and the main course was always the same:
> Roasted Chicken (catered, I presume), frozen or canned vegetables and
> the most wonderful potatoes, tiny ones, canned by a restaurant supply
> house and the sisterhood members in charge of the meal would coat them
> lightly with a mixture of flour and spices, drizzle oil over them and
> bake them until golden brown.  During the meal, these ladies would
> keep baking these potatoes, as many guest would ask for seconds.  I
> never tried to duplicate them at home.

I've never had canned potatoes prepared exactly like that.  Maybe I would 
like them.  I have tried slicing them and frying, but don't like them.  
David will eat them, so we occasionally have them in the house.
 
============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:42:07 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I've never had canned potatoes prepared exactly like that.  Maybe I would 
>like them.  I have tried slicing them and frying, but don't like them.  
>David will eat them, so we occasionally have them in the house.

Are you rinsing them after removing from the can? I keep the whole new baby
potatoes and sliced canned varieties in the cupboard. I found they taste much
better if you rinse them from the liquid they came in THEN cook them. While the
can says you can dump them in a pot and heat them up, they taste terrible. I
decided to rinse them one day, I think more out of a habit from preparing
something else that needed rinsed at that time and I just did it by accident.
They were great. I had to think what I did to make them so much better.

I like the idea of coating then and baking them that the parent post mentioned
and will have to try that when I can experiment.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 18:50:40 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?
> Are you rinsing them after removing from the can? I keep the whole new
> baby potatoes and sliced canned varieties in the cupboard. I found they
> taste much better if you rinse them from the liquid they came in THEN
> cook them. While the can says you can dump them in a pot and heat them
> up, they taste terrible. I decided to rinse them one day, I think more
> out of a habit from preparing something else that needed rinsed at that
> time and I just did it by accident. They were great. I had to think what
> I did to make them so much better. 

I never use the liquid that canned vegetables are packed in.  It is always 
drained.  I think I rinsed the potatoes, but it's a moot point.  I will 
never try eating them again.  Fresh potatoes are too easy to come by and we 
always have them on hand.

============================

From: biig 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 13:36:46 -0500
--------
xxnonexspamxnonexx@tampascanner.info wrote:
> Are you rinsing them after removing from the can? I keep the whole new baby
> potatoes and sliced canned varieties in the cupboard. I found they taste much
> better if you rinse them from the liquid they came in THEN cook them. While the
> can says you can dump them in a pot and heat them up, they taste terrible. I
> decided to rinse them one day, I think more out of a habit from preparing
> something else that needed rinsed at that time and I just did it by accident.
> They were great. I had to think what I did to make them so much better.

   I think I'll try rinsing them.  I have a can that's been in my pantry
for months.  Sliced.  I think I'll try frying them with onion and garlic
in butter, s & p....  Sharon

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 20:06:17 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it biig?
>    I think I'll try rinsing them.  I have a can that's been in my pantry
> for months.  Sliced.  I think I'll try frying them with onion and garlic
> in butter, s & p....  Sharon

Aside from flavor, the major problem I have with canned potatoes is that 
they have a sodden texture taht seems cannot be eliminated.  Sharon, as 
mentioned in the crockpot thread, like potatoes that were put in the bottom 
of the pot for the entire cooking time.  I find them unpleasant.

============================

From: biig 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 16:28:38 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Aside from flavor, the major problem I have with canned potatoes is that
> they have a sodden texture taht seems cannot be eliminated.  Sharon, as
> mentioned in the crockpot thread, like potatoes that were put in the bottom
> of the pot for the entire cooking time.  I find them unpleasant.
 
   Any suggestions on how to use them up?  I "had" thought that nice hot
fat and onions etc might crips them up.....Sharon

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Jan 2006 23:09:59 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it biig?
>    Any suggestions on how to use them up?  I "had" thought that nice hot
> fat and onions etc might crips them up.....Sharon

Certainly I would use them if I already had them.  David cuts them in 
smallish bits and fries them, much like hash browns, in bacon fat.  Onions, 
of course, although he uses granulated onion because he doesn't like fresh, 
and S & P.  I would add a bit of granulated garlic, as well.  You might 
also add in some of the crumbled bacon.  They will certainly be edible, 
maybe even good, but not a gastronome's delight. :-) 

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 16:45:33 -0600
--------
biig wrote:
>    I think I'll try rinsing them.  I have a can that's been in my pantry
> for months.  Sliced.  I think I'll try frying them with onion and garlic
> in butter, s & p....  Sharon

Mom used to buy canned potatos (she loaded the pantry with canned veggies).
She drained them, dusted them with flour and some sort of seasoning.  Then
she deep fried them.  I must admit I liked them.  Your idea of [pan] frying
with onion and garlic sounds good to me :)

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2006 17:54:09 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Mom used to buy canned potatos (she loaded the pantry with canned veggies).
> She drained them, dusted them with flour and some sort of seasoning.  Then
> she deep fried them.  I must admit I liked them.  Your idea of [pan] frying
> with onion and garlic sounds good to me :)

And rosemary.

============================

From: Melissa 
Date: 30 Dec 2005 11:47:34 -0800
--------
Margaret Suran wrote:
> Roasted Chicken (catered, I presume), frozen or canned vegetables and
> the most wonderful potatoes, tiny ones, canned by a restaurant supply
> house and the sisterhood members in charge of the meal would coat them
> lightly with a mixture of flour and spices, drizzle oil over them and
> bake them until golden brown.  During the meal, these ladies would
> keep baking these potatoes, as many guest would ask for seconds.  I
> never tried to duplicate them at home.

They made these exact same potatoes for Shabbat dinner at the summer
camp I attended for years.  For some reason we called them monkey
balls...It was always dissapointing when the kitchen ran out -
especially if you were the one who had to go to the kitchen window for
refills (you kill it, you fill it).  I hadn't thought of those in
years, I may have to experiment a bit once I can look at potatoes after
our planned latke binge.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 22:28:38 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I love potatoes, every variety grown that I've tried.  I detest canned
> potatoes, think they're an abomination.  Instant mashed potatoes aren't far
> behind, but I will eat them in a pinch.  I keep a box of instant mashed on
> hand for it's thickening qualities.

Wayne, I won't buy any instant mashed potatoes, but DH picked up some mashed 
potatoes at Costco about two-three years ago.  They were fabulous.  Costco 
stopped carrying them. I've never seen them since anywhere.  I still 
remember them.  Looking at their site, you can see they care about their 
potatoes.
http://www.usfds.com/retail_potato.htm
They were the "creamy mash."
No Sulfites or Chemical Preservatives
Only the Natural Taste of Freshly Prepared Potatoes

I hope you run into them sometime.  I'm not a potato lover, but they were 
very good.
Dee Dee

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 30 Dec 2005 04:58:39 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee Randall? 
> Wayne, I won't buy any instant mashed potatoes, but DH picked up some
> mashed potatoes at Costco about two-three years ago.  They were
> fabulous.  Costco stopped carrying them. I've never seen them since

I'll look for them, Dee.  Thanks!

============================

From: sarah bennett 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 15:20:16 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I love potatoes! I don't think I've met a potato I didn't like, either.

============================

From: OmManiPadmeOmelet 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:40:05 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I've developed a real dislike for regular Idaho/Russet potatoes.

I only buy Red skin or Yukon golds, the ones with the really thin skins.

And I don't peel them.

For home fries, I mostly use yams now. ;-d

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:43:05 -0500
--------
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

>I only buy Red skin or Yukon golds, the ones with the really thin skins.
>
>And I don't peel them.

Thats where all the flavor is. I buy red potatoes all the time just to boil them
up and serve. I normally just mash open with a fork and put butter (only real
butter), salt & pepper.

>For home fries, I mostly use yams now. ;-d

Thats just, well, awful. yuck. I hate yams/sweet potatoes.

============================

From: Dave Smith 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 10:44:47 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I am indifferent to potatoes. I rarely eat them more than once a week. My
system seems to have trouble digesting them and they end up doing nasty things
to me. I can get away with eating them once in a while but I cannot handle
having them every day.

I confess to liking fries, either French fries or home fries. I like them
roasted or baked. I like small new potatoes boiled and buttered.

============================

From: Dr Hfuhruhurr 
Date: 29 Dec 2005 07:49:21 -0800
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I like tatty's any way, as long as they are HOT!
I cannot stand cold potato in any shape or form. Cold potato salad?
Yeuch.
Fried boiled diced sliced mashed chipped coated gratinated roasted
baked and HOT!!!!

My favourite kitchen gadget? My potato ricer. cuts out all the
'mashing' effort and the peeling too. :-D

Doc

============================

From: MG 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 16:50:11 GMT
--------
a favourite side dish at a restaurant I used to frequent (but sadly, now 
closed) used to add to their mashed potatoes a little crushed garlic (very 
little) a little EVOO, and smashed kalamata olives...heaven in a spoonful!!

never could get them to tell me what the exact quantities were, though I 
tried making it at home and almost got it right lol

I also love those smallish diced and roasted spiced potatoes that my fav 
Argentinian restaurant makes  mmmmmmm

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 01:29:58 GMT
--------
Dr Hfuhruhurr wrote:

> I like tatty's any way, as long as they are HOT!
> I cannot stand cold potato in any shape or form. Cold potato salad?
> Yeuch.

Have you tried the hot German potato salad with blanched red onions and
sliced green peppers made with a bacon dressing?

Bacon dressing
-------------------
Take the appropriate amount of bacon and cut into very small dice, sauté
till brown and fat is 'expressed'.  Pour fat together with the bacon
pieces over the hot potato salad in a warm bowl, mix lighlty & finish
with a little vinegar ( i like to use an apple cider vinegar) season
with salt and pepper.
-------------------

The above is horrible if eaten cold with the congealed bacon fat but is
easily re - warmed in the microwave.

Given the tasty but obviously deleterious effects of this bacon dressing
i will often times substitute a warmed mustard cream dressing for the
bacon dressing in a German potato salad.

> Fried boiled diced sliced mashed chipped coated gratinated roasted
> baked and HOT!!!!

I often make a variation on several French recipes such as filets de
sole olga that are just a baked potato with a slice off the side, the
insides scooped out and mashed, seasoned and then the potato case filled
with 1 or 2 cooked prawns, a small fish filet , or small amount of other
cooked meats (a bit of andoulle sausage is nice) and a sauce, often a
white wine sauce for fish or other sea food, the potatoes returned to
fill the case with the other ingredients, & warm up in a hot oven for a
few minutes and serve with a bit of sauce such as a mornay & some
parmesan sprinkled over the top.

Add a small green  salad and its a meal.

Also, while it might well be a personal idiosyncrasy, i like to add a
bit of anchovy paste to my mashed potatoes, couple that a dollop of nice
goat cheese with each serving and it don't get much better IMO.

============================

From: Dr Hfuhruhurr 
Date: 30 Dec 2005 01:43:30 -0800
--------
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
> Have you tried the hot German potato salad with blanched red onions and
> sliced green peppers made with a bacon dressing?

Now that does sound good. I don't think of things being hot as Salads
but that's just me.
Bacon and Potatoes and Onions, Mmmmmmm. I'm hungry all of a sudden.

> I often make a variation on several French recipes such as filets de
> sole olga that are just a baked potato with a slice off the side, the
> insides scooped out and mashed, seasoned and then the potato case filled
> with 1 or 2 cooked prawns, a small fish filet , or small amount of other
> cooked meats (a bit of andoulle sausage is nice) and a sauce, often a
> white wine sauce for fish or other sea food, the potatoes returned to
> fill the case with the other ingredients, & warm up in a hot oven for a
> few minutes and serve with a bit of sauce such as a mornay & some
> parmesan sprinkled over the top.

I've seen something similar whilst on holiday in Turkey, very VERY
nice.

> Add a small green  salad and its a meal.
>
> Also, while it might well be a personal idiosyncrasy, i like to add a
> bit of anchovy paste to my mashed potatoes, couple that a dollop of nice
> goat cheese with each serving and it don't get much better IMO.

Grated chedder, or cream cheese with a generous spinkling of freshly
crushed black pepper. Have to give the anchovy paste a whizz.

Thanks

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 04:03:14 GMT
--------
Dr Hfuhruhurr wrote:
> Grated chedder, or cream cheese with a generous spinkling of freshly
> crushed black pepper. Have to give the anchovy paste a whizz.

I mis wrote and implied somthing i will now correct.  I use whole mashed
anchovies, i think of this as an 'anchovy paste' or mashed anchovies
when i think about it at all, which, by its instinctual nature with me
these days i rarely do, think about it, i just do it.

I have just posted an explanation of my take on commercially available
tubes of anchovy 'paste' in the "bacon grease for fish" thread and do
not want to repeat myself here but thank you Dr. for your interest.

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:43:05 -0500
--------
Dr Hfuhruhurr wrote:
>I cannot stand cold potato in any shape or form. Cold potato salad?
>Yeuch.

Well theres one preparation I forgot. Potato salad, hot or cold, NASTY. Ooo
yuck. About like cold pizza. horrible stuff.

============================

From: jjsworldSPAM[at]BLOCKERzipcon.com (S'mee)
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 19:02:36 GMT
--------
One time on Usenet, Jill McQuown said:
> I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
> any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
> boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
> biting into a raw one).

Miguel (DH) and Buddy (DS) love raw potato! Ugh, no thanks. Other 
than that, I love spuds, especially russets, but they funk up my 
blood sugar too much...

============================

From: tert in seattle 
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2005 21:48:47 +0000 (UTC)
--------
Jill writes:
>And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
>why?

my favorite variety is la ratte fingerlings -- don't ever pass them up

I like to boil them and serve with a little salt, butter, & fresh parsley

============================

From: "-L." 
Date: 29 Dec 2005 16:15:33 -0800
--------
Jill wrote:

> And if so, why?

I just find them blase.  Give me some wild rice pilaf or a nice fried
(with veggies) rice instead!

> Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?

I only really like au gratin, and then, they are too fattening if made
well.

> I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
> any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
> boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
> biting into a raw one).

I like *some* fries but not many.  I pretty much can take or leave any
of them, though.

============================

From: George 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 14:01:00 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I like the skin left on and especially when it is a little crispy like 
on a baked potatoe. So I don't like "baked" potatoes when they are 
wrapped in foil. That makes them "steamed" potatoes.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 17:48:35 -0600
--------
George wrote:
> I like the skin left on and especially when it is a little crispy like
> on a baked potatoe. So I don't like "baked" potatoes when they are
> wrapped in foil. That makes them "steamed" potatoes.

You have my vote, George!  Rub the potato with butter and salt, sprinkle
with salt and then bake the potato sans foil... let the skin get nice and
crispy and the inside nice and flakey tender.  YUM!

============================

From: Denny Wheeler 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 21:17:25 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>You have my vote, George!  Rub the potato with butter and salt, sprinkle
>with salt and then bake the potato sans foil... let the skin get nice and
>crispy and the inside nice and flakey tender.  YUM!

Yeah.  I kind of understand restaurants' use of foil (don't like it,
but do kind of understand it), but why any home cook would do that to
a self-respecting tater...
gaaaahhh.

(though it strikes me, Jill, that your potato skins might be a bit
over-salty given your double-salting.  Or was that a slip of the
keyboard?)

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 00:14:39 -0600
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:
> (though it strikes me, Jill, that your potato skins might be a bit
> over-salty given your double-salting.  Or was that a slip of the
> keyboard?)

Slip of the fingers... covered in butter and salted twice LOL

============================

From: ~patches~ 
Date: Fri, 06 Jan 2006 14:39:25 -0500
--------
Denny Wheeler wrote:

> Yeah.  I kind of understand restaurants' use of foil (don't like it,
> but do kind of understand it), but why any home cook would do that to
> a self-respecting tater...

On the bbq, foil is really handy.  Drizzle on a little olive oil and 
sprinkle on some Montreal steak spice and you have a really tasty 
potato.  I seldom do this in the oven though since any oil leakage makes 
a mess.  Now I have a self clean oven, that might change.  The skin is 
really good but not crispy.  Personally I favour a crispy skin with 
fluffy insides but during the hot months, potatoes in foil are a close 
second without heating the house :)

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 08:13:20 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> You have my vote, George!  Rub the potato with butter and salt, sprinkle
> with salt and then bake the potato sans foil... let the skin get nice and
> crispy and the inside nice and flakey tender.  YUM!

No garlic?

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 04:37:25 -0600
--------
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
> No garlic?

Garlic on the potato skins?  Hmmm.  I vote no.

============================

From: Rodney 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 16:47:22 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> Garlic on the potato skins?  Hmmm.  I vote no.

Wouldn't it burn by the time a potato baked through?

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 22:21:55 GMT
--------
Rodney wrote:
> Wouldn't it burn by the time a potato baked through?

Being the garlicophyle that i am, baked potatoes are one of the few
things i will purchase garlic granules for.  Butter the potato, season
with salt & pepper and sprinkle liberally with garlic granules.

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 16:13:35 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I love potatoes.  I don't eat them all the time but I like them just about
> any way you care to make them.  Mashed, smashed, baked, fries, roasted,
> boiled, potato chips... I've never met a potato I didn't like (except for
> biting into a raw one).

Hash!  I just thought of this one when my wife suggested roast beef hash 
for dinner.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 00:15:40 -0600
--------
Dan Abel wrote:
> Hash!  I just thought of this one when my wife suggested roast beef hash
> for dinner.

An excellent choice!  I forgot all about corned beef hash and roast beef
hash.  YUM.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 08:34:52 GMT
--------
Jill wrote:
> An excellent choice!  I forgot all about corned beef hash and roast beef
> hash.  YUM.

Having a lot of turkey hash recently but never really being satisfied
with the potatoes in the hash i decided to consult an actual recipe,
nothing really different than i had used before except that in most of
the recipes i have they call for a specific 'cut' of potato that i had
just ignored.  I hate prep work.

According the the recipe for Hachis a l' Amarercaine in August
Escoffier's "Le Guide Culinaire" the potatoes need to be cut into a
small dice.

I rarely follow any of Escoffiers recipes much beyond the actual
ingredients and proportions of them, but, as the guys considered a bit
of an authority i decided to give his advice a go.

It seems illogical or even counterintuitive that a small dice of
potatoes would make a significant difference, but for some reason it
does.  They got nicely and lightly browned, in canola oil and butter, i
added the diced onions about half way through the cooking of the
potatoes, then some crushed garlic and then some flour sprinkled over
all and cooked for a couple of minutes with the pre cooked holiday
turkey meat also cut into small dice.  Added some milk, adjusted the
seasoning with a bit of salt and pepper and, as they say, voile!

Now i have made this dish many times in the past and it usually passed
without comment, edible, and a good way to use up leftover turkey meat,
but this last bit using the Escoffier technique elicited surprised and
admiring comment.  I have since made it with beef to even better
comments.  I am going out to morrow and get some various sausages to try
it with.

I have never attempted a corned beef hash (cans of the commercial stuff
being a 'guilty pleasure') but with the results i have been having
recently....

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 00:39:14 -0800
--------
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
>I have since made it with beef to even better
>comments.

My roast beef hash I make this way.  But...I add some chopped
rosemary, marjoram, and parsley.  Try it.. It is extremely good with
those herbs added.   The milk is a very good touch too...

============================

From: Dan Abel 
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 00:47:26 -0800
--------
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:

> It seems illogical or even counterintuitive that a small dice of
> potatoes would make a significant difference, but for some reason it
> does.  They got nicely and lightly browned, in canola oil and butter, i
> added the diced onions about half way through the cooking of the
> potatoes, then some crushed garlic and then some flour sprinkled over
> all and cooked for a couple of minutes with the pre cooked holiday
> turkey meat also cut into small dice.  Added some milk, adjusted the
> seasoning with a bit of salt and pepper and, as they say, voile!

We usually add red and green bell pepper with the onion.

> I have never attempted a corned beef hash (cans of the commercial stuff
> being a 'guilty pleasure') but with the results i have been having
> recently....

We always have corned beef for St. Patrick's day.  It's pretty cheap and 
good stuff, although not too often, thank you.  However, my favorite 
part is a couple of days later when we make corned beef hash.

My wife isn't too enthusiastic, but we've had hamburger hash a couple of 
times.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 31 Dec 2005 12:17:19 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Joseph Littleshoes?
> I have never attempted a corned beef hash (cans of the commercial stuff
> being a 'guilty pleasure') but with the results i have been having
> recently....

After dinners of roast beef or corned beef, my mom always made either beef 
pot pie or roast beef or corned beef hash.  For the hans, both the meat and 
potatoes were *always* diced.  The results were always predictably 
delicious.  She must have just followed a recipe. 

The first time I follow a recipe or kitchen procedure, I try to follow it 
as precisely as I can.  After that, with any variations I make, the 
resulting differences will be obvious.

============================

From: xxnonexspamxnonexx[at]tampascanner.info
Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:41:16 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
>why?

Sweet Potatoes and Yams

NASTY. Ugly color, even worse after being cooked. 

Taste HORRIBLE, SMELL WORSE especially after being cooked. About like cooked
vomit. Disgusting things.

Other than that, BRING ON THE POTATOES!

Mashed, baked, what have you, love them!

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: Mon, 02 Jan 2006 19:21:05 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why? 

Same for me, but I only eat potatoes in small quantities due to their 
high carbohydrate content.

============================

From: ~patches~ 
Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 20:35:04 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> And if so, why?  Which ones don't you like?  Which ones do you like?  And
> why?

I'm late on this thread since we were away.  I don't like french fries 
or potato chips.  Any other style of potato is fair game for me :)


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