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Subject: Odd uses for potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Dora 
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 14:57:23 -0400
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When I was growing up in England, a popular place was any Italian ice-cream
shop, since they made the tastiest ice-cream.  Imaging my surprise when I
learned that part of the ingredients were mashed potatoes.

Soon after I arrived in the US, I was treated to some home-made chocolate
covered Easter eggs - here again, part of the ingredients were mashed
potatoes.  Delicious.

Is this common knowledge?  I've never heard it mentioned since.

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From: George 
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 23:03:19 GMT
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I caught one of the food TV programs where they visit various types of
restaurants. One show featured ice cream and they were at a dairy farm/ice
cream store that was quite popular. The owner identified potatoes as the
"secret ingredient".

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From: sportkite1[at]aol.com (SportKite1)
Date: 29 Jul 2003 01:59:02 GMT
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Dora wrote:
>Soon after I arrived in the US, I was treated to some home-made chocolate
>covered Easter eggs - here again, part of the ingredients were mashed
>potatoes.  Delicious.

Mashed Potato Easter Eggs are a fairly common recipe for those who make sweets
for their family/friends. I first heard of that recipe two decades ago when my
child was having her first easter and I was exploring homemade
confections....options other than buying commercial candy.

Here's an interesting little tidbit of USAian foodie info. The town adjacent to
the island I live on is really deplete of a sense of community. Lots of big box
stores and chains. But in the midst of this there are two totally vintage
SpudNuts shops. That is. a donut made with Potato flour. 

No doubt they are still bad fer yer, but at least they are prospering in a
world filled with Krispy Kremes and Dunkin Donut.

Ellen

ps...we even have a real true frozen custard shop that does concretes.
OMG...the vanilla frozen custard, blackberries, raspberries and peaches
concrete is one of the most amazing summer confections I've ever had in my
life.

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From: snowshoe[at]xyz.net (Jan Flora)
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 03:22:21 -0800
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Dora wrote:
> Soon after I arrived in the US, I was treated to some home-made chocolate
> covered Easter eggs - here again, part of the ingredients were mashed
> potatoes.  Delicious.

My great-grandmother's recipe for easter candy is made with mashed potatoes.
She was born in the 1870's in Northern Ireland and moved to San Francisco as
an adult. Would you like her recipe? *g* It's delicious.  (I inherited her
recipes!)

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From: Margaret Suran 
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:12:33 -0400
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Jan Flora wrote:
> My great-grandmother's recipe for easter candy is made with mashed potatoes.
> She was born in the 1870's in Northern Ireland and moved to San Francisco as
> an adult. Would you like her recipe? *g* It's delicious.  (I inherited her
> recipes!)

Yes, please, I would love to have your recipe.  Anything with potatoes
has to be delicious and thank you, for your kind offer to share.  

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From: XnewsreaderX[at]myrealXbox.com (j*ni)
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 17:36:00 GMT
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Hark! I heard Margaret Suran  say:
> Yes, please, I would love to have your recipe.  Anything with potatoes
> has to be delicious and thank you, for your kind offer to share.  

I'm interested in seeing it too -- I love older recipes, handed 
down from generation to generation... :-)

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From: Dora 
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 15:04:52 -0400
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Jan Flora wrote:
> My great-grandmother's recipe for easter candy is made with mashed potatoes.
> She was born in the 1870's in Northern Ireland and moved to San Francisco as
> an adult. Would you like her recipe? *g* It's delicious.  (I inherited her
> recipes!)

Please!  Many thanks.

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From: walkerdlwalke[at]aol.com (WalkerDlwalke)
Date: 13 Aug 2003 23:24:58 GMT
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If you have a light bulb that is broken off in the socket, take a potato and
cut it in half.  Jam the flat end of the now-sectioned potato onto the broken
bulb and twist.  Of course, turn off the power to the socket first and don't
eat the potato.

Dave

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From: vstark[at]panix.com (Valerie Stark)
Date: 1 Sep 2003 22:26:26 -0400
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I remember my sister using the flat side of a cut potato as a backstop for 
piercing her ear.  [shudder]  She numbed her ear with an ice cube and 
jammed a sewing needle through (after heating the needle in the flame of 
the gas stove).  

She only did one that way, unsurprisingly.  One earring was NOT acceptable 
waaaay back then, so my mother took her to get the other one done 
properly.  (After much yelling - she'd been forbidden to get her ears 
pierced.)

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From: greykits[at]aol.comkittens (Greykits)
Date: 02 Sep 2003 04:00:08 GMT
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Grandma said to rub a wart with a sliced raw potato during a full moon.  It
worked for me, the wart disappeared.

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From: tomkanpa[at]aol.comic (TOM KAN PA)
Date: 02 Sep 2003 15:14:46 GMT
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When you break a light bulb off in a socket, turn off the light and push a raw
potato into the broken part and unscrew it.

And then there's mash potato fudge.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 02 Sep 2003 15:48:48 GMT
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TOM KAN PA writes:
>When you break a light bulb off in a socket, turn off the light and push a
>raw potato into the broken part and unscrew it.

Flipping the lamp switch off is not nearly good enough, be absolutely certain
to unplug the appliance or neutralize the circuit at the main disconnect lest
one become biggie fries.

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From: sf 
Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 05:24:56 GMT
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Sheldon wrote:
> Flipping the lamp switch off is not nearly good enough, be absolutely certain
> to unplug the appliance or neutralize the circuit at the main disconnect lest
> one become biggie fries.

In any case.... don't bother using a potato, use needle
nosed pliers.

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From: hahabogus 
Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 11:28:37 GMT
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sf wrote:
> In any case.... don't bother using a potato, use needle
> nosed pliers.

While removing stuff from light sockets follow safety rules throw the 
light switch and check for electricity with a meter and then use the 
potato...Needle nose pliers can allow a short to occur of enough strength 
to over heat the house wiring all the way back to the breaker panel and 
possibly cause an electrical fire or the next time there is a heavy load. A 
fire in your walls isn't a good thing or easy to notice

The potato will only cook.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Sep 2003 17:05:57 GMT
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hahabogus writes:
>The potato will only cook.

Your pea brain is cooked.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Sep 2003 17:05:56 GMT
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sf writes:
>In any case.... don't bother using a potato, use needle
>nosed pliers.

Needle nosed pliers is always a better choice... but not in "any" case...
ALWAYS unplug the appliance, or if hard wired de-energize the circuit at the
breaker... if not absolutely certain which circuit then de-energize the Main. 
Only a vegetable brained imbecile would shove a potato into an elecrical
socket.... I've never yet noticed an electrician's tool belt having a pocket
labeled "russet".  Anyways, yoose ladies know a nicely formed carrot would do
ya better than any friggin' spud. LOL

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From: hahabogus 
Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 22:25:49 GMT
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Sheldon wrote:
> Needle nosed pliers is always a better choice... but not in "any"
> case...

I've seen Pliers welded to things...And the heat required to weld the 
pliers will effect the house wiring...use the potato. Dripping plastic 
insulation that is on fire is not a nice thing to see. Whereas a cooked 
spud is  alot nicer to look at... I am a 30 year member of IBEW. What are 
your qualifications Sheldon? I've built 2,000 to 5,000 Amp power supplies 
and you've done what, possibly disassembled a toaster? Use the spud, but 
check with a voltmeter first to be sure the power is off. Multimeters are 
cheap and quite the handy household tool. The power supplied to most houses 
can vary as much as 20-25 volts during peak periods from close to 100V to 
surges in the high 120 volt range...check it yourself. Most appliances like 
it around 110 but don't complain at the loss or gain of 10 volts either 
way too much.

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From: Me 
Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 21:02:55 GMT
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Greykits wrote:
> Grandma said to rub a wart with a sliced raw potato during a full moon. It
> worked for me, the wart disappeared.

I don't know if the moon was full, but a potato worked on my warts.  I tried
this method a year after I went to the determatologist and wasted over
$1,000.  My largest wart fell off in 3 days flat.

I'm a believer.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Sep 2003 22:31:58 GMT
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Me writes:
>I don't know if the moon was full, but a potato worked on my warts.  I tried
>this method a year after I went to the determatologist and wasted over
>$1,000.  My largest wart fell off in 3 days flat.

You and your potato stay away from my peepee!

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From: greykits[at]aol.comkittens (Greykits)
Date: 04 Sep 2003 05:15:48 GMT
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Sheldon wrote:
>You and your potato stay away from my peepee!

I forgot to mention that you are supposed to bury the potato after rubbing the
area with it.

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From: Fudge 
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 11:38:57 -0400
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Bang one up the exaust pipe of the vehicle of someone you really dislike.
Auto will not start but when it does, it farts out a very high velocity
potato projectile. There is also a site on the web for making a potato
cannon using aerosol fire starter and some other junk.

Farmer John

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From: sf 
Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 05:25:21 GMT
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Fudge wrote:
>  Bang one up the exaust pipe of the vehicle of someone you really dislike.
>  Auto will not start but when it does, it farts out a very high velocity
>  potato projectile. There is also a site on the web for making a potato
>  cannon using aerosol fire starter and some other junk.

Why didn't you post it?

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From: Dora 
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:27:25 -0400
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Jan Flora wrote:
> My great-grandmother's recipe for easter candy is made with mashed potatoes.
> She was born in the 1870's in Northern Ireland and moved to San Francisco as
> an adult. Would you like her recipe? *g* It's delicious.  (I inherited her
> recipes!)

Please - I'd love to have it.
P.S.  I don't see my earlier reply to you so I'm reposting.


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