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Subject: Oven-fried French Fries
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: CHERLLEE49[at]webtv.net
Date: Thu, 6 Aug 1998 00:15:45 -0700 (PDT)
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Help!
Anyone has a recipe for oven-fried french
fries?
Thanks,
Cherl

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From: imocku[at]aol.com (Ilene)
Date: 6 Aug 1998 13:31:19 GMT
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Hi Cherl,

Here's two ways:

"Spicy" Oven french "Fries"

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.

Take two large baking potatoes and cut them into long strips - not too thin,
more like diner fry size (peel or don't peel, it's your choice.)

Beat two egg whites with salt, fresh pepper, paprika and chili powder to taste
(if you don't like spicy, leave out everything but the salt and pepper).

Coat the potato wedges and place on a cooking sheet sprayed with non-stick
spray.

Cook for 20 minutes turning once.  After 20 minutes, place the sheet under the
broiler for an additional 15 minutes, turning once.  The broiler is the
finishing touch that gives them that crunchy outside, soft inside "Fried"
crunch.


Oven Rosemary potatoes

Heat a cast iron pan in the oven for about 10 minuts at 400 degrees.  While the
pan is heating, quarter new potatoes and toss them with a little olive oil,
dried rosemary, chopped shallots, salt and pepper.

When I take the pan out of the oven to put the potatoes into it, I first coat
it with a little olive oil.

Place the pan back into the oven.  Move the potatoes around ever 10 minutes
using a metal spatula to prevent sticking.  You can also add some cooking spray
if they begin to stick.  
Potatoes are done when they are crispy on the outside, but soft in the middle. 
It could take about 30 minutes or more.  The shallots will get very dark, but
they taste quite good and add a lot of flavor.

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From: linrey[at]aol.com (LinRey)
Date: 6 Aug 1998 15:54:39 GMT
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Just spray a cookie sheet with nonfat cooking spray, spread your frenched
potatoes on the sheet in a single layer, spray the hell out of THEM with the
spray, and bake at 400 degrees until they're nice and brown and crispy.  Salt
them and eat them.  (We also put vinegar on our french fries, and sometimes
ketchup, too.)

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From: A.Ferszt 
Date: Thu, 06 Aug 1998 17:51:52 -0700
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LinRey wrote:
> Just spray a cookie sheet with nonfat cooking spray, 

What is in 'nonfat' cooking spray? I'm getting a mental image of Teflon
or something, which I'd hardly want to eat.

I always put my frozen chips (fries) under the grill (broiler), without
the use of any fat etc. Always come out nice and crisp. Usually eaten
with mustard and/or mayonnaise.

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From: diestandie[at]aol.com (DieStanDie)
Date: 6 Aug 1998 18:49:14 GMT
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>What is in 'nonfat' cooking spray? I'm getting a mental image of Teflon
>or something, which I'd hardly want to eat.

It's a new name for exactly the same product: Pam.  Vegetable oil, alcohol
(sometimes), lecithin, and propellent.  All the calories come from fat.  Why is
it now labeled "fat free?"  Cos that term may apply to all foods with less than
a half a gram of fat.  A single "serving" of Pam (a couple of 2-second shots,
IIRC) falls into this category.

Ahhhh, the FDA.

G
Enjoying his Misto sprayer filled with cheap, unbelievably fruity Italica olive
oil.

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From: Relaena Sindelar 
Date: Thu, 06 Aug 1998 11:29:20 -0800
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A.Ferszt wrote:
> I always put my frozen chips (fries) under the grill (broiler), without
> the use of any fat etc. Always come out nice and crisp.

So you cut potatoes into wedges or fries, flash freeze them, then broil
them (still frozen?)  If so, sounds like a great idea.

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From: TJ 
Date: Thu, 06 Aug 1998 13:09:15 -0700
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Relaena Sindelar wrote:
> So you cut potatoes into wedges or fries, flash freeze them, then broil
> them (still frozen?)  If so, sounds like a great idea.
 
I suspect they are the store bought precooked kind. I'll be pleasantly
surprized if they aren't.

For my oven fries, I follow the JOC method, which involves cutting the
fries, and soaking them in ice water for at least half an hour. I often
do this wayyyyyyy ahead of time, and rinse them well, then soak for up
to several hours. One must then *dry* them well. I drain, then rub well
with tea-towels. Next I slather my hands with peanut oil and again rub
the fries well. Not much per fry is needed. I get the oven nice and hot,
and put them in, turning at least twice. Cooking time depends on size of
fry, and how brown you want them. 

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From: mikel[at]REMOVETHIScityusa.net (mikel)
Date: Fri, 07 Aug 1998 02:10:16 GMT
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Not a french fry cooker myslelf so this isn't from any experience..
but, on one of the cooking shows I saw... the person metioned that
soaking potatos like this removes some of the starch and helps them
crisp up better.....
any opinions on that?

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From: rdyoung[at]wcc.net (Bob Y.)
Date: Thu, 06 Aug 1998 20:34:01 GMT
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>What is in 'nonfat' cooking spray? I'm getting a mental image of Teflon
>or something, which I'd hardly want to eat.

It is an oil spray, first marketed under the brand name Pam. According to the
Nutrition Data a single serving contains  no calories or fat. Unfortunately a
"serving" is a 1/3 second spray. If you can manage that, you have spray out such
a small amount of oil, you can claim the 0 cal., 0 gms. fat under U.S. rules.

I like to spray it on frozen fries because it does give the extra zip of oil
without adding nearly as much as would regular deep frying would. OTH, when I
REALLY want French fries, I double fry them. I get more oil, but still less than
single frying.

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From: Ramone[at]worldnet.att.net (Ramone)
Date: 6 Aug 1998 21:44:43 GMT
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Bob Y. wrote:
>I like to spray it on frozen fries because it does give the extra zip of oil
>without adding nearly as much as would regular deep frying would.

You've tested this, have you?  How much is "nearly"?  Articles I read
in restaurant trade publications say that potatoes retain the same
amount of oil whether you spray it on and bake them or whether you
"regular" deep fry them, provided they are deep-fried the correct
amount of time and properly drained.  Most people over-fry them and
they puff up and the blisters fill with oil.  These blisters are
imperceptible except under close scrutiny.  Potatoes get done long
before they get brown, and people continue to cook them to the
brownness they like, resulting in blistering and the retention of more
oil.   The only advantage of baking is that this doesn't occur unless
the potatoes have been improperly prepared, that is, covered with an
excessive amount of oil.  In fact, improperly prepared baked
french-fried potatoes can retain more oil than properly deep-fried
ones.  Deep-fried potatoes prepared at home usually contain less fat
than restaurant-prepared ones anyway because the home cook usually
cooks fewer potatoes at a time and drains the potatoes on paper
towels, separating the pieces.  Potatoes prepared in this manner
differ very little from baked ones..  Restaurants allow them to drain
in baskets, which means they don't properly drain, so restaurant
potatoes contain an excessive amount of fat compared to anything
cooked at home by any method.  Technique can make all the difference,
but usually, any difference in a properly fried potato and and a baked
one is in your mind.  

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From: doggie[at]teleport.com (steve knight)
Date: Fri, 07 Aug 1998 05:49:59 GMT
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The easiest way to add very little oil is to put the fries in a bowl
and a little oil and mix them up with your hands. I do this to fry
potatoes pasta and rice.

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From: linrey[at]aol.com (LinRey)
Date: 7 Aug 1998 16:01:45 GMT
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I don't know about all of them, but I use PAM, which, I understand, is an
all-vegetable product.

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From: Vera Ehmann 
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 1998 06:29:51 -0400
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Slice potatoes
Coat both sides with sparingly with oil
Sprinkle with tarregon (optional)
Bake at 375 for 20 minutes or until golden brown
I like to flip the potates over about 10 minutes into the baking process


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