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Subject: Mashed Potato Pancakes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 04:31:11 -0600
--------
Okay, on a stick (or not!) here's my mom's version of mashed potato
pancakes:

2 cups leftover mashed potatoes
1-2 eggs, beaten
1 clove garlic, minced
salt & pepper
flour
3-4 Tbs. vegetable oil

Mix egg, salt & pepper and garlic into chilled leftover mashed potatoes.
Shape into 1" thick patties on waxed paper.  Dust with flour.  Heat oil in a
heavy skillet to about 350F.  Add the potato pancakes a few at a time.  Fry
about 5 minutes on each side, turning when halfway through, until golden
brown on each side.  Serves 6

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 11:55:29 +0100
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Okay, on a stick (or not!) here's my mom's version of mashed potato
> pancakes:
> 
> 2 cups leftover mashed potatoes
> 1-2 eggs, beaten
> 1 clove garlic, minced
> salt & pepper
> flour
> 3-4 Tbs. vegetable oil

How's this for a crazy food idea: Could one make a sweet version of
potato pancakes, adding flour, egg, and sugar, instead of the spices?
(given it is a neutral mashed potato without herbs).

Michael Nielsen

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 04:57:18 -0600
--------
Archon wrote:
> How's this for a crazy food idea: Could one make a sweet version of
> potato pancakes, adding flour, egg, and sugar, instead of the spices?
> (given it is a neutral mashed potato without herbs).

Obviously you can do whatever you wish!  You could probably even top them
with whipped cream.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 12:10:55 +0100
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Obviously you can do whatever you wish!  You could probably even top them
> with whipped cream.

Yep, last thursday I was at a restaurant and had curry soup and it came
with a spoonful of whipped cream on top!

Michael Nielsen

============================

From: Popo Hamwich of Buckleberry Fern 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 21:36:27 -0600
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Obviously you can do whatever you wish!  You could probably even top them
> with whipped cream.

Right, and if you go to a pancake restaurant, my guess is that
you'd get ones that were all sweet.....

Alan

============================

From: Popo Hamwich of Buckleberry Fern 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 08:47:01 -0600
--------
Archon wrote:
>How's this for a crazy food idea: Could one make a sweet version of
>potato pancakes, adding flour, egg, and sugar, instead of the spices?
>(given it is a neutral mashed potato without herbs).

One could.

But, this one wouldn't.

:-)

Alan

============================

From: MH 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 16:28:10 GMT
--------
Popo Hamwich of Buckleberry Fern wrote:
> Archon wrote:
> >How's this for a crazy food idea: Could one make a sweet version of
> >potato pancakes, adding flour, egg, and sugar, instead of the spices?
> >(given it is a neutral mashed potato without herbs).
>
> One could.
>
> But, this one wouldn't.

Me nether, that sounds disgusting.

Martha H.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 19:51:25 +0100
--------
MH wrote:
> Me nether, that sounds disgusting.

However, sugar (and the like) and potatoes together are old news; the
sugar browned potatoes, and pork chops with raisins, apples and brown
sugar (which I know is used in San Francisco, because I got the recipe
from the Evil Yuppie), served with mashed potatoes, and honey glazed
meat with potatoes.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:30:32 -0600
--------
Archon wrote:
> How's this for a crazy food idea: Could one make a sweet version of
> potato pancakes, adding flour, egg, and sugar, instead of the spices?
> (given it is a neutral mashed potato without herbs).

What about using mashed sweet potatoes or yams?

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 14:59:48 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> What about using mashed sweet potatoes or yams?

That works, and perfectly, using your bread crumb idea from your other post.
And, yep, the apple sauce on top tastes great too.

Jack Yammo

============================

From: MH 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 01:50:18 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt wrote:
> That works, and perfectly, using your bread crumb idea from your other post.
> And, yep, the apple sauce on top tastes great too.

Ooooo..yum...I'm on a sweet potato kick these days. Lots of vitamins!! I
think I'll make these this week, with homemade applesauce!

Martha H.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:08:47 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> What about using mashed sweet potatoes or yams?

They are absolutely delicious, but not all that sweet the
way we make them!!

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 18:17:13 +0100
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> What about using mashed sweet potatoes or yams?

Sweet potatoes are not well known of here. I've seen them in some
supermarkets in the "exotic fruit and veggie" department, where you can
one potato in a package with a tight plastic wrapper.

What exactly is a yam? My dictionary say "sweet potato".

Michael Nielsen

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 18:56:37 GMT
--------
Archon wrote:
> What exactly is a yam? My dictionary say "sweet potato".

Sweet Potatoes and Yams are often viewed as two names for the same 
vegetable.On the contrary, they are two somewhat different vegetables. 
Sweet Potatoes are an uncommon crop in the U.S., grown primarily in the 
south. Yams are a sub-tropical plant grown in the Caribbean and Asia and 
imported into the U.S. and other countries. While yams are a vining crop 
that requires almost a year to develop, Sweet potatoes grow in about 100 
- 150 days. 

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 21:09:17 GMT
--------
Archon wrote:
>What exactly is a yam? My dictionary say "sweet potato".

A true yam is a tropical plant and not grown in the USA,
AFAIK.

The word 'yam' is generally used in the USA to mean 'sweet
potato".

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 16:20:06 -0600
--------
Archon wrote:
>What exactly is a yam? My dictionary say "sweet potato".

I can't speak intelligently about the differences.  What I know is that 
the terms are often used interchangeably and, in fact, they are not the 
same tuber.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 22:57:06 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> I can't speak intelligently about the differences.  What I know is
> that the terms are often used interchangeably and, in fact, they are
> not the same tuber.

In most American food stores sweet potatoes are called both sweet
potatoes and yams, the general perceived difference being that when
referred to as sweet potatoes they are generally referring to those
which are more slim in shape, lighter in skin color, and with yellow
drier flesh.  When referred to as yams, they are generally referring to
those which have a somewhat rounder shape, have orange/brown darker
skin, and have orange moist flesh. 

In reality, while they are both tubers, they are not even related.  See
below... 

The Sweet Potato
---------------- 
Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are the root of a vine in the morning
glory family and native to the New World tropics. Its history dates back
to 750 B.C. in Peruvian records. Columbus brought the sweet potato to
the New World from the island of Saint Thomas. The Taino word for them
was batatas which eventually became patata in Spanish, patae in French,
and potato in English. At that time, potato referred to the sweet
potato, and not the generic white potato as it does in English nowadays.
In fact, the white potato did not arrive in the northern regions from
South America until the late 17th century, more than a hundred years
later, according to noted food historian, Waverly Root. 

Popular in the American South, these yellow or orange tubers are
elongated with ends that taper to a point and are of two dominant types.
The paler-skinned sweet potato has a thin, light yellow skin with pale
yellow flesh which is not sweet and has a dry, crumbly texture similar
to a white baking potato. The darker-skinned variety (which is most
often called "yam" in error) has a thicker, dark orange skin with a
vivid orange, sweet flesh with a moist texture. Current popular
varieties include Goldrush, Georgia Red, Centennial, Puerto Rico, New
Jersey, and Velvet. 

The Yam 
-------
The true yam is the tuber of a tropical vine (Dioscorea batatas) and is
not even distantly related to the sweet potato. Rarely found in US
markets, the yam is a popular vegetable in Latin American and Caribbean
markets, with over 150 varieties available worldwide. Generally sweeter
than than the sweet potato, this tuber can grow over seven feet in
length. The word yam comes from African words njam, nyami, or djambi,
meaning "to eat," and was first recorded in America in 1676. 

The yam tuber has a brown or black skin which resembles the bark of a
tree and off-white, purple or red flesh, depending on the variety. They
are at home growing in tropical climates, primarily in South America,
Africa, and the Caribbean. Yams contain more natural sugar than sweet
potatoes and a higher moisture content. They are also marketed by their
Spanish names, boniato and ņame. 

============================

From: C. L. Gifford 
Date: 29 Oct 2002 08:30:30 GMT
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
> In reality, while they are both tubers, they are not even related.  See
> below...

While you are not exactly wrong, what you say is somewhat
misleading. Yams (with limited exceptions) that are available
in the U.S. are indeed a variety of sweet potato. This new
variety was named "yams" by an early marketer and has kept
that name. The true yam is not generally available in the U.S.
and is not related to the sweet potato.

Charlie

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 09:24:03 GMT
--------
C. L. Gifford wrote:
> While you are not exactly wrong, what you say is somewhat
> misleading. Yams (with limited exceptions) that are available
> in the U.S. are indeed a variety of sweet potato. This new
> variety was named "yams" by an early marketer and has kept
> that name. The true yam is not generally available in the U.S.
> and is not related to the sweet potato.

I think that's what I said.

============================

From: C. L. Gifford 
Date: 30 Oct 2002 08:31:18 GMT
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
> I think that's what I said.

I did say that you weren't wrong Thierry. :-)  It just did not
seem clear and I was concerned that someone could be misled. I
attempted to put in a more simple statement. No offence meant
to you.

Charlie

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2002 15:07:36 GMT
--------
C. L. Gifford wrote:
> I did say that you weren't wrong Thierry. :-)  It just did not
> seem clear and I was concerned that someone could be misled. I
> attempted to put in a more simple statement. No offence meant
> to you.

Sorry, Charlie.  No offense taken.

============================

From: Popo Hamwich of Buckleberry Fern 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 21:37:36 -0600
--------
Archon wrote:
>What exactly is a yam? My dictionary say "sweet potato".

Uh. Oh.  Here comes the lecture, from someone, I'm sure!!!

Alan

============================
============================

From: Margaret Suran 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 06:00:01 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Okay, on a stick (or not!) here's my mom's version of mashed potato
> pancakes:

This sounds so good, I will now boil the potatoes and mash them, so that
there will be "leftovers" for tonight's dinner.  The turkey thighs are
in the oven, to be reheated later on, the cranberries are waiting to be
washed and I was wondering what kind of pasta/rice/potatoes to make.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 09:06:02 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Mix egg, salt & pepper and garlic into chilled leftover mashed potatoes.
> Shape into 1" thick patties on waxed paper.  Dust with flour.  Heat oil in a
> heavy skillet to about 350F.  Add the potato pancakes a few at a time.  Fry
> about 5 minutes on each side, turning when halfway through, until golden
> brown on each side.  Serves 6

We do similar. Normally I'd add some minced fresh herbs and
sometimes I bread them rather than flour coat.

============================

From: limey 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 11:44:08 -0500
--------
Arri London wrote:
> We do similar. Normally I'd add some minced fresh herbs and
> sometimes I bread them rather than flour coat.

I always use Italian-seasoned breadcrumbs, rather than flour.  Gives
the potatoes a little extra oomph.  They're popular at my house!

Dora

============================

From: connieg999[at]aol.com (ConnieG999)
Date: 27 Oct 2002 18:15:08 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Okay, on a stick (or not!) here's my mom's version of mashed potato
> pancakes:

In our family the recipe was quite similar. We added a bit of finely minced
onion, and didn't flour. The potatoes themselves got a nice brown crust from
the frying.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:29:05 -0600
--------
limey wrote:
> I always use Italian-seasoned breadcrumbs, rather than flour.  Gives
> the potatoes a little extra oomph.  They're popular at my house!

OK, Dora, how do you do the breading?  Don't laugh.  I think I'd put the 
crumbs in/on something, then lay the potato cake on top, then sprinkle 
or pat more crumbs on the top and sides.  Am I close?    My SIL made 
some potato cakes from leftover mashed a couple weeks ago but he didn't 
season them at all and they were pretty bland.  I remember that when my 
mom made them she used an egg in the mixture, too.  I think I'll try the 
Italian-seasoned breadcrumbs.  Sounds good.  Thanks for the tip.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:11:02 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> OK, Dora, how do you do the breading?  Don't laugh.  I think I'd put the
> crumbs in/on something, then lay the potato cake on top, then sprinkle
> or pat more crumbs on the top and sides.  Am I close? 

That's the way we do it. You could dip them in egg first,
but the crumbs will stick without. If you don't have the
Italian-seasoned breadcrumbs, just add whatever seasonings
to whatever breadcrumbs you do have.

Curry seasonings work well, as do seasonings for making
chile etc.

============================

From: Kajikit 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 18:13:21 +1100
--------
Jill McQuown wrote or else it was an imposter and we're all in
trouble:

>Mix egg, salt & pepper and garlic into chilled leftover mashed potatoes.
>Shape into 1" thick patties on waxed paper.  Dust with flour.  Heat oil in a
>heavy skillet to about 350F.  Add the potato pancakes a few at a time.  Fry
>about 5 minutes on each side, turning when halfway through, until golden
>brown on each side.  Serves 6

That sounds really good! It makes me wish that it wasn't time to cook
dinner right now so I could have some  - I'll have to make them
tommorrow :)

============================

Subject: !!Re: Mashed Potato Pancakes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 05:58:50 -0600
--------
Margaret Suran wrote:
> The turkey thighs are
> in the oven, to be reheated later on, the cranberries are waiting to be
> washed and I was wondering what kind of pasta/rice/potatoes to make.

Margaret, with this menu it sounds like you are having an early Thanksgiving
dinner with your friend Marcel!  Turkey.  Potatoes. Cranberries. (smiling)

Tell Marcel I said "hi".  And pat Tandoora for me.  (I'm picturing Tandoora
stealing some turkey off Marcel's plate!)


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