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Subject: Potato salad & mayo
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: moosmeat[at]mindspring.com (moosemeat)
Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 22:06:17 GMT
--------
I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
and I cannot ever remember a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

============================

From: "Peter G. Aitken" 
Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 23:36:36 GMT
--------
In my experience potato salad usually has mayo in it, but some recipes use
vinaigrette rather than mayo and can be quite good. Did these "experts"
sugest an alternative to mayo?

============================

From: JaniceRae[at]webtv.net (Jan)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 11:34:13 -0400 (EDT)
--------
Well....Really good potato salad has both vinagrette and mayo!  I use
vinagrette while the potatoes are still hot (Wishbone Italian is good)
then when they cool, add rest of ingredients and mayo...makes a terrific
potato salad.   See, everyone is right!

============================

From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 00:21:53 GMT
--------
>I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
>virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
>that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.

Sounds like that person had been smoking more than ribs :>  Of course
one puts mayo in Potato Salad, as opposed to just any old salad made
with potatoes.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 16 Jun 2000 00:34:53 GMT
--------
GERMAN POTATO SALAD
Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less. 

3 pounds large boiling potatoes (about 6)
1/2 pound of lean bacon (about 8 slices), cut crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces
1 cup finely chopped onion
1 cup thinly sliced celery
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
6 tablespoons cider vinegar
3 hard-boiled large eggs, chopped
1/3 cup chopped dill pickles
1/2 cup thinly sliced scallion greens 

Quarter the potatoes lengthwise and cut them crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces. In
a vegetable steamer set over boiling water steam the potatoes, covered, for 10
to 15 minutes, or until they are tender, and transfer them to a large bowl. In
a large heavy skillet cook the bacon over moderate heat, stirring, until it is
crisp and transfer it to paper towels to drain. Pour off all but 4 tablespoons
of the fat, to the skillet add the onion and the celery, and cook the mixture
over moderately low heat, stirring, until the onion is softened. Add the sugar,
the flour, and the celery seeds, and cook the mixture, stirring, for 30
seconds. Stir in the mustard, the vinegar, and 1/2 cup water, bring the mixture
to a boil, stirring, and simmer it for 2 minutes, or until it is thickened.
Season the dressing with salt and pepper, pour it over the potatoes, and stir
in the eggs, the pickles, the bacon, and the scallion greens. Serve the salad
warm. 

Serves 6.
   
Gourmet 
January 1990 

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Potato salad & mayo
From: moosmeat[at]mindspring.com (moosemeat)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 20:41:29 GMT
--------
>3 pounds large boiling potatoes (about 6)
>1/2 pound of lean bacon (about 8 slices), cut crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces
>1 cup finely chopped onion
>1 cup thinly sliced celery
>1 tablespoon sugar
>2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
>1 teaspoon celery seeds
>1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
>6 tablespoons cider vinegar
>3 hard-boiled large eggs, chopped
>1/3 cup chopped dill pickles
>1/2 cup thinly sliced scallion greens 

It seems to me it would be less confusing if the recipe simply called
for 1/2 cup of Allium Cepa Aggregatum the first place instead of
"shallots".

============================

From: wstewart[at]hawaii.rr.com (Ward Stewart)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 08:55:15 GMT
--------
>Sounds like that person had been smoking more than ribs :>  Of course
>one puts mayo in Potato Salad, as opposed to just any old salad made
>with potatoes.

Try it sometime with proper vinaigrette on the potatoes while they are
still hot -- it will be absorbed and then some will release itself
again all cream with the potato.  To hell with hellmans!

============================

From: Elaine Parrish 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 14:37:44 -0500
--------
> Try it sometime with proper vinaigrette on the potatoes while they are
> still hot -- it will be absorbed and then some will release itself
> again all cream with the potato.  To hell with hellmans!

I make a version of no-mayo potato salad, but I haven't stumbled on 
the perfect vinaigrette. What's yours?

============================

From: wstewart[at]hawaii.rr.com (Ward Stewart)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 22:02:44 GMT
--------
>I make a version of no-mayo potato salad, but I haven't stumbled on 
>the perfect vinaigrette. What's yours?

A complex and demanding recipe 

    Oil ( preferably olive) plenty
    Vinegar or lemon juice or lime juice or a combination -- not too much
    Dijon Mustard -- or not depending on how you feel
    Garlic -- fresh (of course) squeezed through a press.
    S&P

whip it all together and voila!

If you like it sort of creamy, add a little mayo

============================

From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 19:52:32 GMT
--------
>Try it sometime with proper vinaigrette on the potatoes while they are
>still hot -- it will be absorbed and then some will release itself
>again all cream with the potato.  To hell with hellmans!

Of course I've had those yuppified potato salads.  They can be very
nice, but generally resistable.  It's the Hellmanaised potato salad
with eggs, pickles, green olives, celery and onion that brings joy.  I
made much too much last weekend and was all too happy to eat it the
next couple of days for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in-between :> 

============================

From: "Jack Schidt" 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 23:39:05 GMT
--------
Hello!  knock knock (on your head).  There's been potato
salad made without mayo for at least 1000 years.  That's
longer than yuppies or hellman's has been around.

============================

From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 00:39:02 GMT
--------
>Hello!  knock knock (on your head).  There's been potato
>salad made without mayo for at least 1000 years.  That's
>longer than yuppies or hellman's has been around.
>
>Jack NoMayo

They were resistible, which is why they were ignored until the yuppies
rediscovered them and they started appearing in salad bars and catered
lunches.  Blame as much as possible on the yuppies, I say.

============================

From: "Jack Schidt" 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 04:15:21 GMT
--------
Curly Sue wrote:
> They were resistible, which is why they were ignored until the yuppies
> rediscovered them and they started appearing in salad bars and catered
> lunches.  Blame as much as possible on the yuppies, I say.

Ah, no, curly, we germans have been making potato salad
(kartoffelsalat) for many years.  You sound like you need to
experience real cuisine.  I laugh as I hear folks talk about
bratwurst (from wisconson), mexican food, italian food (yeah
the bottled sauces), potato salad, even hot dogs (with
ketchup), on this newsgroup. Don't worry, what you like is
fine for you; let's not make it the edict.

If you like to make potato salad with mayo, go right ahead.
If you want to boil ribs, do it.  If you use crisco, do it
up.  You Know.

Jack Laughs

Jack Sez

============================

From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 14:54:45 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt wrote:
>Ah, no, curly, we germans have been making potato salad
>(kartoffelsalat) for many years.  You sound like you need to
>experience real cuisine.

I don't know about "real cuisine," but I've been to Germany.  Some
things were good, some were not.

>  I laugh as I hear folks talk about
>bratwurst (from wisconson), mexican food, italian food (yeah
>the bottled sauces), potato salad, even hot dogs (with
>ketchup), on this newsgroup. 

You certainly are easily amused!

>Don't worry, what you like is
>fine for you; let's not make it the edict.

Absolutely- that was why Moosie started the thread.  Some poor fool
said mayonnaise is a no-no in potato salad.  Not only is it not a
no-no, but it is clearly the superior version.

>If you like to make potato salad with mayo, go right ahead.

If you want to make potato salad with vinegar and bacon, go right
ahead.

>If you want to boil ribs, do it.  If you use crisco, do it
>up.  You Know.

You can do those things if you want to also.  But you know that.

>Jack Laughs
>
>Jack Sez
>

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:58:02 GMT
--------
Curly Sue wrote:
> I don't know about "real cuisine," but I've been to Germany.  Some
> things were good, some were not.

as usual

> >  I laugh as I hear folks talk about
> >bratwurst (from wisconson), mexican food, italian food (yeah
> >the bottled sauces), potato salad, even hot dogs (with
> >ketchup), on this newsgroup.
>
> You certainly are easily amused!

Yup

> >Don't worry, what you like is
> >fine for you; let's not make it the edict.
>
> Absolutely- that was why Moosie started the thread.  Some poor fool
> said mayonnaise is a no-no in potato salad.

moosemeat reported falsely that someone said that; it wasn't
stated the mayo was verboten.

>Not only is it not a no-no, but it is clearly the superior version.

In your little world, it sure is.  In my little world, it's
not.  In fact, I haven't seen much here in the way of
superiority.

> >If you like to make potato salad with mayo, go right ahead.
>
> If you want to make potato salad with vinegar and bacon, go right
> ahead.

I will

> >If you want to boil ribs, do it.  If you use crisco, do it
> >up.  You Know.
>
> You can do those things if you want to also.  But you know that.
>
> >Jack Laughs
> >
> >Jack Sez

Jack Sez - Curly Sue, have a good weekend

============================

From: alphadawn[at]webtv.net (GRANNY)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 16:19:28 -0400 (EDT)
--------
dear Jack NoMayo,
I love you..

Everything I ever wanted to know about being  female, I am learning from
my grandaughter.

============================

From: Carmen Bartels 
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 12:26:20 GMT
--------
Curly Sue wrote:
> Of course I've had those yuppified potato salads.  They can be very
> nice, but generally resistable.  It's the Hellmanaised potato salad
> with eggs, pickles, green olives, celery and onion that brings joy.  I
> made much too much last weekend and was all too happy to eat it the
> next couple of days for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in-between :> 

More praise to you!
We use eggs, apples, weiners and pickled cucumbers (cornichons preferred)
with our potatoes. Too bad Hellman's Mayo or Salad Dressing is no
longer sold here. But I bought a 64 oz bottle at Costco while with
Kaari and Alan of the full fat mayo and now can make salads again (and
will give away about half of the amount to family, friends and
colleagues so that it gets eaten before it becomes bad). 

Carmen,
now knowing which salad will be eaten this weak at work

============================

From: "Cyndi H" 
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 00:05:56 GMT
--------
I don't care for real mayonnaise in my potato salads.  I prefer to use Kraft
Miracle Whip Salad dressing in mine (regular, light or fat free - doesn't
matter which).  Using mayonnaise seems IMO to give it a heavy, and slightly
greasy taste.  Each to their own.  Cyndi

============================

From: Debbie 
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 09:01:43 GMT
--------
Cyndi H wrote:
>I don't care for real mayonnaise in my potato salads.  I prefer to use Kraft
>Miracle Whip Salad dressing in mine (regular, light or fat free - doesn't
>matter which).  Using mayonnaise seems IMO to give it a heavy, and slightly
>greasy taste.  Each to their own.  Cyndi

Plus, Miracle Whip gives the potato salad a flavor that has a "bite"
to it.  Not bland like mayonnaise.

============================

From: kathy 
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 07:19:30 -0700
--------
Everybody,

This is unreal. I couldn't beleive the number of people out
there that does not understand true potato salad.
I was raised on southern potato salad with and without
eggs, with and without mustard, dill or sweet pickle.
Always with mayo. Sometimes with Miracle Whip (I perfer
mayo).  German potato salad made two different ways
depending on whether it is served hot or cold.  And when I
married, my husbands farm raised mother made country patato
salad made with hot slightly  mashed potatoes (leaving
lumps) (cooked just like you would mash potatoes) adding
chopped onion, dill pickle, eggs and a touch of apple cider
vinegar to taste.  Served still slightly warm.

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 14:59:51 GMT
--------
kathy wrote:
> This is unreal. I couldn't beleive the number of people out
> there that does not understand true potato salad.

I think there is no "true" potato salad, like there's no
"true" chili, etc, etc.  Nice recipes in this thread.

Jack Spud

============================

From: debbiegrrl[at]aol.com (DebbieGrrl)
Date: 24 Jun 2000 03:14:35 GMT
--------
kathy writes:
>  And when I
>married, my husbands farm raised mother made country patato
>salad made with hot slightly  mashed potatoes (leaving
>lumps) (cooked just like you would mash potatoes) adding
>chopped onion, dill pickle, eggs and a touch of apple cider
>vinegar to taste.  Served still slightly warm.

thats how my grandma (from georgia) made potato salad..we used to call it
"grandmas mashed potato salad"...it was especially wonderful, the next day when
you could slice it and put it on a sandwich...just bread, tater salad and a
slice of tomato...mmmmm

============================

From: Cindy Hamilton 
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 19:02:29 GMT
--------
Debbie wrote:
> Plus, Miracle Whip gives the potato salad a flavor that has a "bite"
> to it.  Not bland like mayonnaise.

Umm...  Isn't that what the mustard and vinegar are for?

============================

From: lscanlon[at]erols.com (Leo Scanlon)
Date: Sat, 24 Jun 2000 11:41:45 GMT
--------
Debbie wrote:
>Plus, Miracle Whip gives the potato salad a flavor that has a "bite"
>to it.  Not bland like mayonnaise.

If you want mayo with a real "bite" to it, order some McIlhenny Farms
"Spicy Mayonnaise" with Tabasco in it.  It took me a few tastings to
get used to it, but now I like it a lot.  Nice creamy flavor, too, but
at a price of 11 grams of fat/TB.  It available from www.tabasco.com.

============================

From: pattee[at]spot.Colorado.EDU (Donna Pattee)
Date: 23 Jun 2000 17:30:02 GMT
--------
Cyndi H wrote:
>I don't care for real mayonnaise in my potato salads.  I prefer to use Kraft
>Miracle Whip Salad dressing in mine (regular, light or fat free - doesn't
>matter which).  Using mayonnaise seems IMO to give it a heavy, and slightly
>greasy taste.  Each to their own.  Cyndi

 MW is sooo sweet. I wouldn't have thought I could tell the 
difference between MW and mayo until the day I asked for a side of mayo
for my french fries. I dipped one in and nearly spit it out! They had
given me MW.

============================

From: Alan 
Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2000 11:32:38 -0500
--------
I like Miracle Whip, too, but not the fat free type -- that tastes
like "other stuff" not like MW.

============================

From: dmflynn[at]webtv.net (Dempsey Flynn)
Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2000 08:44:19 -0400 (EDT)
--------
hellmans has always been #1 for me and my family. im new here,

============================

From: "Charlotte L. Blackmer" 
Date: 25 Jun 2000 18:26:27 GMT
--------
Barry Grau wrote:
>In the US, in blind tests, it is usually evaluated as much better than any 
>other commercial mayo. In the same tests it is also usually described as 
>almost indistinguishable from homemade mayo. The latter result makes me 
>wonder about how they made their homemade, 

No kidding!  I can certainly tell the difference.

>but Hellman's is clearly the best 
>commercial mayo widely available in the US.

AKA "Best Foods" in the West, as has been noted.

Out here I can actually get just like homemade mayo in the deli case at
the fancy store - at only five dollars for a small tub :-/  Boy was I in
for sticker shock when Trader Joe's stopped selling it (for about half the
price).  But it is made in San Francisco and probably doesn't travel well.

It's very good and is what we use on sandwiches and for dipping fries.

I am thinking about trying potato salad for July 4, and will use the
recipe in Fannie Farmer (potatoes get a little vineagrette bath just 
after cooking and before the mayo is mixed in) since this sounds like the
process for the deli potato salad I like.  I haven't ever made a potato
salad I liked as much as the classic potatoes-celery-green onions-mayo one
the fancy store deli (or Trader Joe's) sells premade.  So when I get a
craving, I usually buy some.  

============================

From: Marca 
Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 17:26:39 -0700
--------
moosmeat wrote:
>I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
>virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
>that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
>I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
>and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
>it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

Wow, I hate potato salads with mayo in them, but then I don't
like mayo in most things.
Give me a nice German potato salad (with bacon and vinegar), or a
potato/pesto salad-those I like. Most people I know like the
mayonnaise-y kind of potato salad, though-that's what they think
of when they think "potato salad". So, I would say this is really
a matter of personal taste, not a religious thing.

Parboiling ribs before bbqing them?  That IS a religious thing.
It's like putting them through the de-flavorizing machine! I beg
my FIL, who is otherwise a sensitive and fine cook not to do
this.

============================

From: Sandi Dunlap 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 02:13:13 GMT
--------
Marca wrote:
> Wow, I hate potato salads with mayo in them, but then I don't
> like mayo in most things.
> Give me a nice German potato salad (with bacon and vinegar), or a
> potato/pesto salad-those I like. Most people I know like the
> mayonnaise-y kind of potato salad, though-that's what they think
> of when they think "potato salad". So, I would say this is really
> a matter of personal taste, not a religious thing.

I agree with that. I'm not a big fan of potato salad with mayo. I grew up
with German style potato salad so I guess that has a lot to do with it.

============================

From: Elaine Parrish 
Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 19:49:16 -0500
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

It's not a no-no around my house! But, all the rage around here
now (which means the rest of the world has probably been doing it
forever) in all the fancy sandwich shops is to use sour cream instead of
mayo. boo, hiss. Except of course at the BBQ huts. Long live the
BBQ Huts!!

============================

From: blakem[at]ix.netcom.com (blake murphy)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 04:53:29 GMT
--------
i've gotten good results using equal parts oil, vinegar, and mayo, and
a litttle dijon mustard.  (salt & pepper, of course.)

your pal,
blake

============================

From: Brad 
Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 23:16:48 -0700
--------
You guys are talking about two distinct different kinds of
potato salad. German and the mayo style. Of course you wouldnt
use mayo in German style.

============================

From: Carmen Bartels 
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 12:20:56 GMT
--------
Brad wrote:
> You guys are talking about two distinct different kinds of
> potato salad. German and the mayo style. Of course you wouldnt
> use mayo in German style.

Wrong,
you are talking about 2 different kinds of *german* potato salads.
Southern german potato salad is made with broth and vinegar. 
Northern german potato salad is made with mayo. I was totally puzzled
about what was called "german" potato saladon rfc because I never had
the salad with broth and vinegar up to then. On asking my mother she
told me that my father (being from northern Germany) does not like it
so I never got it in the nearly 30 years up to then.

If you want to check out german resources search for
"Speckkartoffelsalat" -bacon potato salat- or "Warmer Kartoffelsalat"
-warm potato salad- for the broth one and
"Kartoffelsalat (mit Mayonaise)" -potatosalad (with mayo)- for the
other one.

Else I could post recipes of both as we do it at home (meanwhile my
mother who was raised on southern german food taught me how to do this
one too).

Carmen,
who likes both and decides what to do depending on the other dishes she
plans to serve

============================

From: Brad 
Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2000 22:56:29 -0700
--------
Carmen Bartels  wrote:
>Wrong,
>you are talking about 2 different kinds of *german* potato salads.

A thousand pardons. The point of my post was that neither one is
right or wrong but they are different styles. Dont really care
who gets the credit for inventing them.

============================

From: Carmen Bartels 
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 20:07:01 GMT
--------
Brad wrote:
> A thousand pardons. The point of my post was that neither one is
> right or wrong but they are different styles. Dont really care
> who gets the credit for inventing them.

No problem.
I only object to the belief that germans don't use mayo in their salad;-)
This for me means that only southern german dishes are known and THAT
needs to be rectified 

Carmen,
who has to admit that there are very tasty dishes in southern Germany

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 05:32:34 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

Well, you were warned to stay out of there with your heretical ideas.
Mayo is not a no-no. Just that there are plenty of recipes that taste
better without mayo, such as:

                     *  Exported from  MasterCook  *

                     Potato, Cucumber and Dill Salad

Recipe By     : Bon Appetit
Serving Size  : 4    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Barbeque                         Dinner
                Lunch                            Salads
                Vegetables                       Potatoes
                Side Dish

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
   2      lb            baby red potatoes -- sliced
   3 1/2  tbsp          rice wine vinegar
   1 1/2  tbsp          country style dijon mustard
   6      tbsp          canola oil
     1/2  c             fresh dill -- chopped
     3/4  lb            pickling cucumbers -- sliced
                        sprigs of dill

Cook potatoes in boiling water until just tender. transfer to large
bowl. Add 2 Tbsp vinegar to hot potatoes, and stir gently. Combine
remaining 1 1/2 Tbsp of vinegar and mustard in small bowl. gradually mix
in oil. Add chopped dill. Mix into potatoes. Season with salt and
pepper. Cover, and chill in refrigerator. Bring to room temp before
serving. Add dill sprigs.

                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Serving Ideas : great with barbecue

NOTES : A quick low-fat, no-cholesterol side dish

============================

From: "Jack Schidt" 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 11:41:43 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

It was me.

I'm tchoimann and for me, potato salad is made with potatoes
(duh), salt, pepper, oil, vinegar and bacon.   just my NMO.

Jack Kartoffelsalat

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: 16 Jun 2000 14:40:02 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

All that matters in this or any other food argument
is your taste buds. If you enjoy potato salad made 
with mayo, then that's what's important. 

For the record, other than the German potato salad 
that the mother of a friend of mine makes, I have
never heard of potato salad without mayo in it. I
used to make five gallon drums of the stuff at a
restaurant where I used to work and mayo was a key
ingredient in every batch I made. Our potato salad
usually sold out pretty quickly. Maybe this is a 
regional thing though. I live in the Philadelphia 
area so maybe in some other areas, mayo in potato salad
is scorned.

============================

From: Madeline 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 10:59:46 -0500
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

After years of making potato salad with mayo or in the German style, I 
found this in Fine Cooking 2 or 3 years ago.  My husband often asks me 
to make it.:

FRENCH STYLE POTATO SALAD
(Many thanks to Jean-Louis Gerin)

2# Yukon Gold Potaties, scrubbed not peeled (new potatoes are good too)
1 -1/3 cups dry white white (I use Sauvignon Blanc)
Freshly ground white pepper and salt (I use Kosher)
1/2 cup EV olive oil
1 T minced shallot
2/3 cup chopped scallions

Boil the whole unpeeled potatoes in generously salted water until 
fork-tender, 20-30 minutes, depending on size.  As soon as you can 
handle the potatoes but while they're still warm, slice them just under 
1/2 inch thick with a very sharp knife.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, boil the wine until it's reduced 
by half.  Sprinkle the salt, pepper and hot reduced wine over the warm 
potatoes; toss gently.  Add the olive oil, tossing just until combined, 
and then add the shallots and scallions.  Taste and adjust the 
seasonings.  Serve at room temp.  Yum.

You can also use othe ingredients such as chopped ripe tomato, bacon 
bits and hard-cooked egg, or anchovies and diced roasted pepper, or 
chopped olives, minced garlic and cubed chicken, or lemon juice, caviar, 
creme fraiche and snipped chives, or paprika, capers and smoked salmon.  
We like the original recipe the best.

============================

From: moosmeat[at]mindspring.com (moosemeat)
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 16:23:20 GMT
--------
..  Add the olive oil, tossing just until combined, 
>and then add the shallots and scallions.  Taste and adjust the 
>seasonings.  Serve at room temp.  Yum.

So what is the difference between a shallot and a scallion?

============================

From: Marca 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 11:12:10 -0700
--------
moosmeat wrote:
>So what is the difference between a shallot and a scallion?

They are sometimes used interchangeably in recipes, although they
look quite different. A shallot is a small, delicately flavored
onion-type thing with a papery brownish skin (in fact, it looks
like a cross between a miniature yellow onion and a garlic).  A
scallion is called a green onion on the west coast-a long, narrow
white-transitioning-to-green thing that can be used either raw or
cooked.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 16 Jun 2000 19:52:48 GMT
--------
Marca writes:
>A scallion is called a green onion on the west coast-a long, narrow
>white-transitioning-to-green thing that can be used either raw or
>cooked.

But in fact all immature onions are classified as green onions or spring
onions, except that scallion is a distinct variety of onion insomuch that as it
matures it doesn't form a bulb, the scallion remains straight-sided.

============================

From: Madeline 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 14:13:42 -0500
--------
moosmeat wrote:
> So what is the difference between a shallot and a scallion?

Well for starters, shallots are often, but not always, known as Allium 
cepa aggregatum (or A.ascalonicum).  Shallots have a distinctive flavor 
among their other allium counterparts and are supposed to be mildč never 
hot.  I would describe them as sort of a cross between mild onion and 
garlic.  

Scallions, OTOH, can be onions of many many varieties, picked in the 
immature stage or sometimes a non-bulbing onion too.

============================

From: Goomba 
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 15:28:30 -0400
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> I ventured into rec.food.barbecue on a missionary run to advance the
> virtues of parboiling ribs (Big Mistake).  Anyway one poster replied
> that parboiling ribs was worse than putting mayo in potato salad.
> I have been eating potato salad for more years than I care to remember
> and I cannot ever remember  a potato salad that didn't have mayo in
> it.  What about this-is mayo now a no-no or what?

Some of the BEST potato salad I ever had was just cooked room temp
'taters dressed in the best extra virgin olive oil, lots of salt,
pepper, red onions and flat leaf parsley.  Out of this world!
Goomba

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: 'kay now, how do you make your 'tater salad (was Potato salad  w/Mayo)

============================

From: "Joseph & Virgina Tadrzynski" 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 12:06:01 -0400
--------
We all saw Moosie's original post regarding Potato salad with Mayo.  There
are those who swear by using and those who swear at using it.  There are
also those who would decree that all Yuppie Puppies die by ingesting
non-mayo'd 'tater salad.  What is your best recipe for potato salad?  I have
made various types but none to hubby's expectation of "Mom's".  (when asked
what she puts in it she smiles sweetly and says 'potatoes').  Let's call out
the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!
-Ginny

============================

From: "Peter G. Aitken" 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:06:48 GMT
--------
>  Let's call out
>the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!
>-Ginny

I don't have an official recipe because I eyeball this each time, but it
works for me.

About 2 lbs small (2 inch diameter) Yukon Gold or red-skinned potatoes,
washed but unpeeled and whole.
1/2 c diced sweet onion. If the onion is on the strong side, pour boiling
water over it for 10-15 secs then drain.
2 hardboiled eggs, chopped.
1/2 c mayo (homemade is preferable) mixed with 2 tsp dijon mustard. I prefer
green peppercorn flavored mustard.

Cover potatoes with cold water in a saucepan and slowly bring to the boil.
Simmer for 15-20 minutes until just barely done and drain. As soon as you
can handle them, cut into desired size pieces. Toss with mayo dressing,
eggs, onions, ands salt/pepper to taste. Refrigerate for at least an hour
before serving.

============================

From: blakem[at]ix.netcom.com (blake murphy)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:08:00 GMT
--------
>  Let's call out
>the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!
>-Ginny

o.k.  i don't think i've posted any recipes here, but since you asked:

four, maybe five, new or red-skinned potatoes, boiled til fork-tender.
drain, and then cut up into your favorite chunk size.  while still
warm ,drizzle with 2 tb oil (olive oil is prolly best, but knock
yourself out) , freshly ground back pepper,  a quarter to a half cup
minced celery , 2 tbs vinegar, 2 tbs. mayo.
it says here, 'combine in the order given.'  words to live by.

your pal,
blake

============================

From: aquari[at]aol.comNOJUNK (Aquari)
Date: 17 Jun 2000 20:37:00 GMT
--------
                    Potato Salad

3 - 4 Russets boiled til fork tender but not mushy.  Peel or not as you like,
cut in cubes

Celery,  chopped up 3 - 4  stalks

Yellow onion, chopped up  !/2 med size onion to 3 - 4 potatoes

4 or 5 strips of crisp cooked bacon, broken into bits

1/2 C walnuts, broken up

Hard boiled egg if you want it

Mayo (Best Foods, certainly not Miracle Whip or anything that remotely
resembles it)

Durkee's Dressing -- 1 - 2 tbsp

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine mayo and Durkee's, set aside.
In a good sized bowl, combine potatoes, celery, eggs and onion.  

Add dressing and mix gently. Chill well.  When ready to serve, fold in bacon
and walnuts.

============================

From: TJ 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 14:25:30 -0800
--------
>  Let's call out
>the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!
>-Ginny

I do mine without measurement, with an eye towards ending up with enough
goo to coat the taters. This is my mother's method. 
Boil whole, jacketed taters. When cooked but not the least bit falling
apart (the most crucial step) peel quickly, dice, and toss gently with
raw beaten egg until the egg gets opaque and the potato is cool. Add a
teensy bit of olive oil, some lemon juice, and add minced onions and
celery as befits. You may also salt and pepper, and I add a pinch of
celery seed if I haven't the fresh stuff.
Anyone else do this raw egg trick?

============================

From: "wvriter" 
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:01:00 -0400
--------
I cook potatoes in salted water with the skins on, new ones for choice, but
cut up if necessary.  When tender, I drain them and douse with vinaigrette
while hot.  I add sliced onions, celery seed, celery chopped, sliced or
chunked hard cooked eggs and then mayonnaise with mustard.  Taste for salt
and coarse ground pepper.  Chill the whole thing but I like it to be room
temp when I eat it.

============================

From: Debbie 
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 11:05:25 GMT
--------
>  Let's call out
>the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!
>-Ginny

6 medium-sized russet potatoes, cubed and boiled to fork-tender
3/4 cup Miracle Whip
3 T vinegar
1 t salt
1 T sugar
1/8 t pepper
1 onion, diced
chopped celery and/or chopped green olives if desired

Mix all the above ingredients.  Chill.

Serve with a sprikle of paprika on top.
Mix t

============================

From: botpulliamhansen[at]earthlink.net (Terry Pulliam Hansen)
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 22:38:57 GMT
--------
Debbie wrote:
>6 medium-sized russet potatoes, cubed and boiled to fork-tender
>3/4 cup Miracle Whip
>3 T vinegar

*Miracle Whip*??? Aaaauuugghhh!!! Blasphemy! Unclean!

                     *  Exported from  MasterCook  *

                               Mother's Potato Salad

Recipe By     : Ninelle Hopkins Pulliam
Serving Size  : 4    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Salads And Salad Dressings

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
   2 1/2  cups          potatoes -- cooked, cubed
   1      teaspoon      sugar
   1      teaspoon      vinegar
     1/2  cup           onion -- chopped
     3/4  cup           mayonnaise
                        salt
                        celery seed
   3                    eggs, hard-boiled -- sliced
                        paprika

Sprinkle potatoes with sugar and vinegar. Add onion, mayonnaise, salt
and celery seed to taste. Toss. Fold in 2 eggs. Decorate top with
rounds of egg and sprinkle with paprika for garnish. Chill.

                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
An' the mayo better be Hellmann's (Best out here in the West), tew.

Terry "Squeaks" Hansen

============================

From: LIZZIERI[at]webtv.net
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:09:28 -0400 (EDT)
--------
I boil 3 or 4 potatoes, cut in chunks when cool.  Add chopped onion.
litte chopped green pepper, little chopped celery or celery seed. A
little mayo, and mustard.  Let sit in frig til cold  Enjoy!!  Liz . 

============================

From: iveylynn[at]webtv.net (ivey)
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 17:58:26 -0500 (CDT)
--------
Boil any kind of potatoes (with skins on) at same time as boiling 8
eggs. We love a few potatoes with our egg salad. Leave skins on potatoes
or take them off, it really doesn't matter. Chop just enough onion to
add some flavor but not to be obvious. Chop a little celery and a lot of
pickles. Salt and pepper to taste and then add a bunch of Miracle Whip.
Chill. Yummmmmm.~~Ivey

============================

From: Mary Pelis 
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 12:52:07 -0400
--------
Ingredients: potatoes, diced Vidalia onions, celery, hard bolied eggs &  a
couple of small cukes - not those waxed things

Marinate cooked potatoes in Italian dressing for a couple of hours.  Add rest
of stuff when taters are cooled.  Mix in Hellman's mayo (I guess it's called
"Best" somewhere west of here).  You don't need as much mayo because the
dressing helps with the moisture factor.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 14:16:12 -0400
--------
> Joseph & Virgina Tadrzynski wrote:
> 
> > We all saw Moosie's original post regarding Potato salad with Mayo.  There
> > are those who swear by using and those who swear at using it.  There are
> > also those who would decree that 

> > all Yuppie Puppies die by ingesting non-mayo'd 'tater salad.  

> > What is your best recipe for potato salad?  I have
> > made various types but none to hubby's expectation of "Mom's".  (when asked
> > what she puts in it she smiles sweetly and says 'potatoes').  Let's call out
> > the big guns here..........Make my Potato Salad!

First of all, I am happy to note that you admit that non-mayo potato
salad will kill people.

I made potato salad for lunch today.  I tried something different and
I'm thinking I'll keep doing it that way ... I boiled the potatoes
whole with the skins on, and they came off easily when they had cooled
enough to be handled.  (okay, my vegetable peeler has disappeared)
Smoother texture, I thought.  Maybe it's my imagination.  I saw someone
do that on tv.  

Chopped them, pretty small dice (I don't care so much for sliced), and
just added dijon mustard, mayo ... plenty of that, I don't want it to
be too mushy, but not dry, either ... minced celery, the younger stalks
with! the leaves, sweet relish, boiled eggs, celery seed, minced onion,
I think that's about it.  If I had sour cream, I'd have thrown in some
of that in a heartbeat.  

By the way, thanks to whoever advised adding vinegar to the cooking
water for the boiled eggs.  These eggs must be very! fresh, because I
threw the first batch out as they were driving me crazy.  These were
no problem.

No great shakes, this is just comfort food stuff to me.


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