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Subject: Yukon GOld Potatoes... [and sub threads]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Phil(NM) <goldpnr[at]_yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 21:50:32 GMT
--------
Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me.... are these baking, frying
or mashing potatoes? What is/are the best way to use these?

Thanks!
Saradoc Hill from Buckland   <G>
or 
Hambut Dogwood of Shadydowns    ???   

Or dear.... a split Hobbitersonality! And I don't have any ring either!

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 15:05:18 -0700
--------
Phil(NM) asked:
>Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me.... are these baking, frying
>or mashing potatoes? What is/are the best way to use these?

I prefer roasted, in butter and garlic, skins still on.

Roasted Yukons with Garlic slices

INGREDIENTS:
     8 Yukons, quartered, unskinned.
     8 cloves Garlic, thin-sliced
     1/4 cup butter, melted
    Salt and Pepper to taste

METHOD:
Preheat oven to 425°F. Wash and quarter Yukons. Place into buttered 13" X 9"
X 2" Pyrex. Slice, thinly, each clove of garlic and layer over and under
each quarter. Salt and pepper to taste. Set pan into oven for 1hr, 30min, or
until done. Turn all wedges if you like them crispy at the halfway point, 45
minutes. Serve hot.

============================

From: Peg Haine <mlh4[at]cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 18:12:43 -0400
--------
Phil(NM) asked:
>Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me....

15 lbs?  You are one lucky guy.  I'm with The Ranger, only I'd grease
'em up with chicken, duck, or goose fat, if you've got access to some.
Mmmmmmmm.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 23 Sep 2002 22:18:02 GMT
--------
Phil(NM) asked:
>Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me.... are these baking, frying
>or mashing potatoes? What is/are the best way to use these?

Yukon Gold are good all of the above ways and my favorite, oven roasted... cut
into fat wedges, coat with oil, s 'n p, and roast in a pan, turning often till
all puffy and golden... serve HOT, with sour cream.

============================

From: Jamie_Canuck <jamie_canuck[at]rogers.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 01:15:32 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Yukon Gold are good all of the above ways and my favorite, oven roasted... cut
> into fat wedges, coat with oil, s 'n p, and roast in a pan, turning often till
> all puffy and golden... serve HOT, with sour cream.

What Sheldon said, but for a little variation, try putting the wedges in a
bowl with olive oil and toss with Montreal Steak Spice... turn into pan and
roast. I do this in foil on the BBQ too, the crispy bits that stick to the
foil are quite tasty.

Now that's good eats.

============================

From: Cate <orson14850[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 11:59:26 -0400
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Yukon Gold are good all of the above ways and my favorite, oven roasted... cut
> into fat wedges, coat with oil, s 'n p, and roast in a pan, turning often till
> all puffy and golden... serve HOT, with sour cream.

I like 'em this way too, except... serve them with roasted red pepper-garlic
mayonnaise. Mmmmm.

============================

From: <sharkman[at]comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 22:20:25 GMT
--------
> What is/are the best way to use these?

mash... head of roasted garlic..

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 19:20:43 -0300
--------
Phil(NM) wrote:
> Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me.... are these baking, frying
> or mashing potatoes? What is/are the best way to use these?

Lucky you!  We rarely see them up here.  I like them either mashed or baked.
Or, if I'm having fish, just boiled with the skins on and served with
butter, salt &amp; pepper.

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 23 Sep 2002 23:56:30 GMT
--------
Dans un moment de folie, Gabby écrivit:
> Lucky you!  We rarely see them up here.  

Where are you?  In Iqaluit?  If you're in Canada, you can get them 
anywhere.  In fact, Yukon Gold were, according to the Canadian Food 
Inspection Agency, developed in Canada, viz.:

>Origin &amp; Breeding: bred from the cross (Norgleam x W5279-4) at the
>University of Guelph and selected jointly by Agriculture Canada, the
>University of Guelph and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and 
>Food, Guelph, Ontario (Canada) in 1966.

They also add, just because it's the actual topic of this thread:

>Utilization: very good for boiling, baking, and french frying; 
>unsuitable for chipping; retains its yellow flesh color when cooked.

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/potpom/var/yukongold/yukone.shtml

En français:

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/francais/plaveg/potpom/var/yukongold/yukonf.shtml

You can also download a one-page .pdf reference from:

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/francais/plaveg/potpom/var/yukongold/yukongold.pdf

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 21:34:42 -0300
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> Where are you?  In Iqaluit?  If you're in Canada, you can get them
> anywhere.  In fact, Yukon Gold were, according to the Canadian Food
> Inspection Agency, developed in Canada, viz.:

You live in the National Capital Region, I guess they're available to you
all the time.  But no you can't get them everywhere in Canada.  If you live
in a small town, they're not always available (due in part to people still
not being too crazy about a yellow-fleshed potato).   I'm in Labrador and
here stores, when they're not using our local product, usually only bring in
one or two kinds of potato at a time.  Once in a blue moon that second kind
will be Y.G. instead of a red potato.

============================

From: Miss Jaime <justforjaime[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 21:04:13 -0400
--------
Gabby wrote:
>You live in the National Capital Region, I guess they're available to you
>all the time.  But no you can't get them everywhere in Canada.  If you live
>in a small town, they're not always available (due in part to people still
>not being too crazy about a yellow-fleshed potato).   I'm in Labrador and

I see them in the stores at least 75% of the year but I could be wrong
in that as I am not always noticing they are there. I don't eat
potatoes.

Miss Jaime Stuart  (honorary surname)
(Hamilton, Ontario, CANADA) 

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 23:14:02 -0300
--------
Miss Jaime wrote:
> I see them in the stores at least 75% of the year but I could be wrong
> in that as I am not always noticing they are there. I don't eat
> potatoes.

But I don't think Hamilton qualifies as a small town.    ;o)

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 24 Sep 2002 02:20:52 GMT
--------
Dans un moment de folie, Gabby écrivit:
> But I don't think Hamilton qualifies as a small town.    ;o)

Sure it does, it's just a large small town :-)

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 23:41:46 -0300
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> > But I don't think Hamilton qualifies as a small town.    ;o)
>
> Sure it does, it's just a large small town :-)

Sorry Michel, a city that has 100 thousand more people than the population
of my province doesn't qualify as a small town (even if it has a size
complex when it compares itself to Toronto).   ;o)

============================

From: Miss Jaime <justforjaime[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 22:53:17 -0400
--------
Gabby wrote:
>Sorry Michel, a city that has 100 thousand more people than the population
>of my province doesn't qualify as a small town (even if it has a size
>complex when it compares itself to Toronto).   ;o)

Hamilton people think Hamilton is better then Toronto.

Hamilton does have a small town feel to it even though it is a big
city.  I have noticed that since moving here from Toronto in 1994.
Toronto never felt that way to me and i was born and raised there.

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 00:33:15 -0300
--------
Miss Jaime wrote:

> Hamilton people think Hamilton is better then Toronto.

Doesn't every town think it's better than Toronto??   ;o)

> Hamilton does have a small town feel to it even though it is a big
> city.  I have noticed that since moving here from Toronto in 1994.
> Toronto never felt that way to me and i was born and raised there.

It's all relative I guess.  I was born and raised in a village of 1500, the
nearby town had 5000 people.  No way Hamilton would feel like a small town
to me.  I remember arriving in Toronto in 1975 and not wanting to go out of
my apartment building without my husband.  It took me a few months before I
felt comfortable enough to go downtown by myself.  Now maybe if I'd been
born and raised in TO, Hamilton would feel like it does to you.  Imagine the
culture shock when I moved from Toronto to Labrador!

============================

From: Miss Jaime <justforjaime[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 08:55:43 -0400
--------
Gabby wrote:

>Doesn't every town think it's better than Toronto??   ;o)

Well let's see, I have lived in Stratford and in London
and I never got that feeling in either so I will say...No.

I could be wrong however. My answer was just a guess.

>It's all relative I guess.  I was born and raised in a village of 1500, the
>nearby town had 5000 people.  No way Hamilton would feel like a small town
>to me.  I remember arriving in Toronto in 1975 and not wanting to go out of
>my apartment building without my husband.  It took me a few months before I
>felt comfortable enough to go downtown by myself.  Now maybe if I'd been
>born and raised in TO, Hamilton would feel like it does to you.  Imagine the
>culture shock when I moved from Toronto to Labrador!

Heh heh.  I can just imagine. The same thing happened to me when I
went from TO to Stratford.

Right now I am trying to find a place in the general vicinity of
Caledon Village within a 75 mile radius.

============================

From: Ross Reid <mrreid[at]nospam-golden.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 20:30:08 -0400
--------
Miss Jaime wrote:

>Right now I am trying to find a place in the general vicinity of
>Caledon Village within a 75 mile radius.

A 75 mile radius of Caledon village covers a whole lot of territory.
As a matter of fact, since there's only about 69 miles between the
two, Hamilton qualifies.

============================

From: Miss Jaime <justforjaime[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 21:06:19 -0400
--------
Ross Reid wrote:
>A 75 mile radius of Caledon village covers a whole lot of territory.
>As a matter of fact, since there's only about 69 miles between the
>two, Hamilton qualifies.

Funny. I was told there was at least 52 kilometres between his place
and Hamilton.

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]applicable.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 10:32:57 GMT
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
>> But I don't think Hamilton qualifies as a small town.    ;o)
> 
> Sure it does, it's just a large small town :-)

Any place with a Professional Canadian Football Team isn't a small town. 

============================

From: Miss Jaime <justforjaime[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 08:51:33 -0400
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>Any place with a Professional Canadian Football Team isn't a small town. 

We also have the Canadian Football Hall of Fame here.  One of these
days I will visit it.  :-)

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 24 Sep 2002 02:19:59 GMT
--------
Gabby écrivit:
> You live in the National Capital Region, I guess they're available
> to you all the time.  But no you can't get them everywhere in
> Canada.  If you live in a small town, they're not always available
> (due in part to people still not being too crazy about a
> yellow-fleshed potato).   I'm in Labrador and here stores, when

Oh well, Labrador...I was pretty close when I said Iqaluit.  We're 
all at the mercy of local tastes.  I can't get a decent vindaloo 
here.  

I actually meant central Canada, what's between Wippineg and Trois-
Pistoles :-)

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 23:30:41 -0300
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:

> Oh well, Labrador...I was pretty close when I said Iqaluit.  We're
> all at the mercy of local tastes.  I can't get a decent vindaloo
> here.

And I can't sit at the Crown and Heart or the Royal Oak here or eat at the
Green Door.   We all have our crosses to bear.

> I actually meant central Canada, what's between Wippineg and Trois-
> Pistoles :-)

I will not scream... I will not scream . . . I will...

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 24 Sep 2002 12:06:26 GMT
--------
Gabby écrivit:

> And I can't sit at the Crown and Heart or the Royal Oak here or
> eat at the Green Door.   We all have our crosses to bear.

Please, I don't frequent alcohol-srving establishments, not do I eat at 
the Green Door (the smell of javex on the plates and cutlery makes me 
ill).  The Table is much better and a cheesecake to die for.
 
>> I actually meant central Canada, what's between Wippineg and
>> Trois- Pistoles :-)
> 
> I will not scream... I will not scream . . . I will...

Why not?  Out there, no one can hear you :-)

============================

From: Harry Demidavicius <harry.d[at]shaw.ca>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 23:29:20 -0600
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
>>> I actually meant central Canada, what's between Wippineg and
>>> Trois- Pistoles :-)
>> 
>> I will not scream... I will not scream . . . I will...
>
>Why not?  Out there, no one can hear you :-)

WTF is Winnipeg? ;0)

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 25 Sep 2002 11:35:42 GMT
--------
Harry Demidavicius écrivit: 
> WTF is Winnipeg? ;0)

Who knows...to me it's never been anything but an airport, a pit stop 
between East and West.  I spent four boring hours there on a direct 
flight from Ottawa to Edmonton because of a storm preventing 
refuelling.  I hear people have settled around the airport in a sort 
of shantytown.  Some bear came from there but I say Pooh to that.

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 23 Sep 2002 22:40:46 GMT
--------
Phil(NM) écrivit:
> Just had a 15 pound bag of #1's given to me.... are these baking,
> frying or mashing potatoes? What is/are the best way to use these?

Eating boiled or mashing preferred.  

============================

From: Steve B <steve[at]sharpeningmadeeasy.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 22:40:58 GMT
--------
Cooks Illustrated May &amp; June 2002 reported these make the best Greek 
style skillet browned potatoes.

============================

From: Feuer <feuer[at]his.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 18:46:59 -0400
--------
These are great boiling potatoes.  Just put them in boiling water, cook
until done, and eat immediately.  They taste best right out of the pot,
but you can also use them for great mashed potatoes: no butter
necessary.

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 23 Sep 2002 23:13:32 GMT
--------
Yukon Gold potatoes are excellent in mashed form! Yum!

============================

From: Colin McGregor <cooking[at]DEATH-TO-SPAMMERS.mcgregor.org>
Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 23:24:50 GMT
--------
Well, history wise they were developed at the University of Guelph, in
Guelph, Ontario. Yukon Gold potatoes are a medium starch potato, a
compromise between the likes of the high starch big dark brown Russet
potatoes and the likes of the low starch little red Norland potatoes.
Also means that in a pinch Yukon Gold potatoes can do just about
anything (hey there Canadian so of course they can tackle anything
:-)), though quite frankly Yukon Gold potatoes are not as good as say
the (U.S. developed) Russet potatoes in some roles like say french
fries. 

My preference for Yukon Golds is in a gratin and similar baked
casserole sytle dishes.

============================

Subject: Re: Yukon GOld Potatoes... How much do you pay?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Paul M. Cook©® <pmBERMUDA_SHORTScook[at]gte.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 15:55:01 GMT
--------
Yukons are scarce where I live.  Typical of your yupscale communities I
can't get decent groceries to save my life in this town.  Everyone has
$100,000 kitchens yet they eat out every night.

How much do you pay for Yukon Gold potatoes?  The one store that carries
them in even a small number wants 4 bucks a pound if you can believe that.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 09:32:09 -0700
--------
Paul asked:
> How much do you pay for Yukon Gold potatoes?

Depends on when and where, really... At one of our local Farmers' Market,
you can buy 150ct for US$0.50 / lb., or 90ct for US$1.00 / lb.  At the three
local grocery stores I shop, they range in size and price, as well but are
usually priced at 90ct for US$0.59.

============================

From: Michel Boucher <alsandorz[at]rogers.com>
Date: 24 Sep 2002 21:54:42 GMT
--------
The Ranger écrivit: 
> you can buy 150ct for US$0.50 /lb., or 90ct for US$1.00 /lb.  

I'll take the 150 for 0,50$US please.

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 19:17:11 -0300
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> I'll take the 150 for 0,50$US please.

I presume that 150 ct is the size of the potatoes.  The smaller the potato
the lower the price?  But 50 cents/lb (well, 75 cent/pound for us) is a darn
good price unless the potatoes are the size of golf balls.  I don't recall
ever getting YGs for less than a dollar/lb.

============================

From: zphysics1 <zphysics1[at]socal.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 01:09:29 GMT
--------
Don't know where you are. Our supermarket sells 10 lb bags of Yukon for
$3.99.

============================

From: Paul M. Cook©® <pmBERMUDA_SHORTScook[at]gte.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 04:02:46 GMT
--------
zphysics1 wrote:
> Don't know where you are. Our supermarket sells 10 lb bags of Yukon for
> $3.99.

SoCal.

Found a 2 pound bag for 4 bucks.  COL is high here.

============================

From: Dwayne <jenco[at]kans.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 07:51:09 -0600
--------
Paul M. Cook©® wrote:
>How much do you pay for Yukon Gold potatoes?  The one store that carries
>them in even a small number wants 4 bucks a pound if you can believe that.

I buy Yukon Gold eyes from a catalog company and plant my own.  I am just
digging them now, and you wont believe how good Yukon Golds are when they
are fresh out of the ground.  Good luck, Dwayne

============================

From: Ross Reid <mrreid[at]nospam-golden.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2002 11:23:36 -0400
--------
Paul M. Cook©® wrote:
>How much do you pay for Yukon Gold potatoes?  The one store that carries
>them in even a small number wants 4 bucks a pound if you can believe that.

One small, local, non-chain grocery store has new crop Yukon Gold
advertised this week at (Canadian)$9.99 for a 50 lb. bag. At the
current exchange rate, that's just under 13 US cents a pound.

============================

From: nobody[at]nevermind.com (Frogleg)
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2002 12:49:09 GMT
--------
Paul M. Cook©® wrote:
>How much do you pay for Yukon Gold potatoes?  The one store that carries
>them in even a small number wants 4 bucks a pound if you can believe that.

$4/lb? Insane. I usually get 'em at WalMart for roughly the same price
as others in a 5lb bag. $2.50? 

============================

Subject: Re: Yukon GOld Potatoes... All these suggestions!!
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Phil(NM) <goldpnr[at]_yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 18:41:12 GMT
--------
Are great, but I sure wish folks who say to do them one way or another
would post the recipes to go along with their suggestions......  (thanks
to those who did!) 1 pound gone, 14 pounds to go....  
and for the person who asked prices, I think my friend said he gets
these 15 pound sacks for a couple bucks....... he evidently lives in the
middle of Yukon Gold grower country up in Washington State....

============================

From: Cate <orson14850[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2002 16:07:49 -0400
--------
Phil(NM) wrote:
> Are great, but I sure wish folks who say to do them one way or another
> would post the recipes to go along with their suggestions...... 

There's no recipe because I made it up out of desperation, but here's,
roughly, how I made the aforementioned mayonnaise. (This will make enough
about 6-8 servings as a dip, which I served in one ramekin per guest.)

2.5 cups mayo
8oz jar roasted red peppers, drained and lightly pressed dry with paper
towel
3 garlic cloves
salt and pepper to taste

Put everything in your food processor until you can't see pieces of the red
peppers anymore, or only little tiny pieces. It should be about the same
consistency as plain mayo. If it's slightly runny, chill in fridge to set a
bit before serving.

============================

Subject: Yukon Gold report
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Phil(NM) <goldpnr[at]_yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2002 00:06:28 GMT
--------
OK tried them as Oven Baked Potatoes. 

first with nothing on them. yuck! Dry and grainy. little flavor

added a bit of butter, some S&P, and they were Ok, but I can get the
same taste and tecture from a good Russett... Nothing to rave over
here.....

There's one baked one left, I guess I'll slice that one up and fry it up
with some eggs (Over easy, and a wee bit of salsa please) and toast for
breakfast tomorrow... 

Then will try the cut, oiled and herbed suggestions next... 

So far, I wouldn't pay more for them than I would for any other
potatoe.....

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 26 Sep 2002 01:22:19 GMT
--------
Phil(NM) writes:
>So far, I wouldn't pay more for them than I would for any other
>potato.....

I'd not either.  If I'm gonna pay extra they'd better be fresh dug... I'm sure
yours are storage taters, 'cause fresh dug yukon golds are wonderful.  I
usually get russets or reds... but when I feel like splurging I go for the "new
potatoes", those big fingerlings are wonderful, if they're fresh.  All storage
spuds suck, may as well eat Wonder White.  Once you've had fresh dug taters
you'll never enjoy another stupidmarket potato again.  I'm lucky, here on Lung
Guyland, from spring until fall, I can get fresh dug spuds from the farm stands
that are scattered about most every neighborhood.   Sometimes you can hit the
stupid market spuds just right.. smell em, if they smell like dirt (rich loamy
earth like when yer digging woims), feel damp, and squirt juice when you poke
your fingernail into the skin, they're fresh dug.  Eating storage potatoes is
like eating old corn, only opposite... soon as they're picked, with corn the
sugar turns to starch, with taters the starch turns to sugar.  Most folks in
the US have never eaten a fresh dug tater... they think McD's fries is the
benchmark... Ahahahahahahahahahahaha. . . . 

============================

From: MH <bastzine[at]worldnet.att.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2002 01:53:40 GMT
--------
Phil(NM) wrote:
> So far, I wouldn't pay more for them than I would for any other
> potatoe.....

Drop the "e". : ) Yukons are not baking potatoes, but they're perfect for
mashing.

Martha H.

============================

From: goaway[at]leavemealone.com (Sheryl)
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2002 12:50:25 -0400
--------
MH wrote:
>  Yukons are not baking potatoes, but they're perfect for
> mashing.

Funny, I like Yukon Golds, but for me it's not a flavor factor, it's a 
texture factor.  Fluffy spuds for baking and mashing, red and white 
"waxy" potatoes for roasting, frying, boiling, salads, etc.  Yukons are 
really in between a russet and a new potato. Almost as fluffy as a 
russet, but they hold their shape better and are not as waxy as a new 
potato.  Yukons are really similar to what are called "all-purpose" 
potatoes, like the round ones you get from Long Island or Maine.

Although, I just bought a 5 lb bag of small "Idaho Russet" potatoes for 
$1.99 and I'm looking forward to baked, mashed and roasted. You can also 
grate these for latkes, which I might just do tomorrow...I found an 
old-fashioned "tennis racket" type potato grater at a church rummage 
sale and I want to test drive it!

============================

From: Gabby <Lavolanges[at]msn.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2002 14:01:56 -0300
--------
Sheryl wrote:
> Funny, I like Yukon Golds, but for me it's not a flavor factor, it's a
> texture factor.  Fluffy spuds for baking and mashing, red and white
> "waxy" potatoes for roasting, frying, boiling, salads, etc.  Yukons are
> really in between a russet and a new potato. Almost as fluffy as a
> russet, but they hold their shape better and are not as waxy as a new
> potato.  Yukons are really similar to what are called "all-purpose"
> potatoes, like the round ones you get from Long Island or Maine.

The fluffy factor is why I also love Yukon Golds.  I like a dry potato --
for anything.  There is nothing more disappointing to me than picking up a
bag of spuds and finding upon cooking the first batch that I could use them
to putty my windows. Bleech!
In this neck of the woods, we never know what kind of potato we're getting
when we buy a bag (unless it's the rare YG).  You've got your choice of red
or white, but never is a variety indicated on the bag -- you pay your money
and take your chances.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2002 13:05:01 -0500
--------
Phil(NM) wrote:
> OK tried them as Oven Baked Potatoes.

They make excellent potato chips.

============================

Subject: Re: Yukon GOld Potatoes... All these suggestions!! -Phil
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: taz98273[at]webtv.net (Judy)
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 18:31:03 -0700 (PDT)
--------
Phil(NM) wrote:
>Are great, but I sure wish folks who say to do them one way or another
>would post the recipes to go along with their suggestions......

http://www.potatoes.com/recipes.cfm?Query=C&IDList=16

  My favorite way to prepare them.. 

(besides baked au gratin style with paprika or lighly fried in a
well-seasoned cast iron skillet) 

would be in the oven, on a large oiled baking sheet, in slices laying
flat, a la baked potato chips!  Not terribly healthy, but they sure
taste durn good :), especially with slices of something else mixed as
well, like garlic.

But when i get too many for us two use, i start tossing a few in the pot
every time i boil some water for anything, and keep the cold ones in the
fridge for quick mini meals.    

We're "using up" a paper bag of large reds right now ourselves, as a
matter of fact.  

Be sure to your keep your taters under the kitchen sink/ in the garage
whatever, out of lightbulb range.  They turn green so fast that way!!    

============================

From: taz98273[at]webtv.net (Judy)
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2002 19:00:27 -0700 (PDT)
--------
A teeny tiny link correction.

There were 2 recipe pages, one for foodservice, and one for us
consumers.  
This one is the right one, i think! LOL
(Cream of Potato Soup for 48!! :O)

http://www.potatoes.com/recipes.cfm?Query=C&IDList=16,47


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